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Old Kästles to resume downhill skiing?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I haven't skied downhill for 8 years (I was never very good at it and my country is very flat), but I've skied some cross-country (including down smallish hills) last two winters.

I have recently acquired old non-shaped Kastle skis (my brother brought them from abroad as he bought them in a garage sale for $10). They are 195cm long and literally in mint condition (never used). Kastle RX-5 (or maybe it is RX-S) SL-3000 skis with Marker M38 bindings.

I'm going downhill skiing to Are, Sweden in a month.

Should I even bother bringing the old straight Kastles or just rent modern shaped skis instead?
post #2 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by juu View Post
I haven't skied downhill for 8 years (I was never very good at it and my country is very flat), but I've skied some cross-country (including down smallish hills) last two winters.

I have recently acquired old non-shaped Kastle skis (my brother brought them from abroad as he bought them in a garage sale for $10). They are 195cm long and literally in mint condition (never used). Kastle RX-5 (or maybe it is RX-S) SL-3000 skis with Marker M38 bindings.

I'm going downhill skiing to Are, Sweden in a month.

Should I even bother bringing the old straight Kastles or just rent modern shaped skis instead?
Sniff..sniff..I will take the bait. go with the shapes, if you can, get a high performance rental, not just the low level rack rentals. I would also suggest to take a lesson, the new shapes require lateral movement vs. the up/down movement of that old 195cm toothpick.
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks, Philpug. I'm not sure what you mean by "low level rack rental" though, but I interpret that as not going for the cheapest pair of skis that they offer.

BTW I'm 183cm myself; are those Kastles too long for me?
post #4 of 19
Skis may be OK for use, but with your limited experience may be a bit of a struggle compared to shorter shaped skis.

I'd be concerned about the bindings, though. I think the M38 were a demo binding that no longer is indemnified, which means no certified tech can check their release function of adjust them for you.

Overall, I'd think you'd have a better time if you rented modern gear.
post #5 of 19
I had a pair of those exact same Kastle skis around 1989 or so, also 195cm (I am 6'1", and back then 195cm was among my shorter skis). They were really nice skis at the time, but after a couple hard seasons they went limp on me. I have them in my garage now, since I can't bear to part with skis that gave me such a good return. Maybe they will be on the wall someday, though mine were neon-yellow and that won't help my interior-decorating case with the wife.

If I had to choose between the Kastles and some modern skis here in 2007, it would be a no brainer to go with modern skis. You will enjoy yourself much more with a shorter modern ski that does everything better than the Kastles ever could. And Kneale makes a great point to avoid the bindings all together. When I took my old bindings of the Kastles a couple years ago, they pretty much disentegrated even though they hadn't been used in 10+ years.
post #6 of 19
I'm guessing you don't own a pair of alpine ski boots.

If you will need to rent a pair of boots just rent skis also, the old binding on your skis will need to be adjusted to the rental boot, they will need to be tested and may need to be remounted on the ski. This will cause you problems. Just rent, leave the skis home.
post #7 of 19
I've got some old Kastles in the garage attic. I doubt they'll come out this winter. They are interesting for a run or two but not nearly as much fun as say, anything you could rent.
post #8 of 19
Is the RX-5 the neon yellow?

I can wholeheartedly reccomend Hansons at the Åre square. Best rental equipment in the Åre valley. At least if you want to try the more interesting skis and dodge the most smelly boots. You can easily upgrade skis to another "level" all during the week for the difference in fee for the remaining days. (But that of course holds for all the shops)
post #9 of 19
Rent some new shaped skis. It will make things a lot easier on you.
post #10 of 19
Since you're going to Are, where professional skier Jon Olsson hosts his annual invitational every year, yeah I'd leave the Kastles at home (perhaps mount them over the mantle for posterity).

As Phil suggested, get some "top shelf" demos. What Phil meant by avoiding "bottom rack" was that you don't want to get the resorts every day rentals, which will most likely be some old skis from a few seasons ago and probably beat up. Get some demos of current (2006 and 2007) model skis.

If you're going to get back in the sport, don't go backwards in terms of gear!

post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all your replies; much appreciated and I will just leave the old skis at home.

Carl - mine are white, and thanks for the Hansons recommendation.
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by juu View Post
I haven't skied downhill for 8 years (I was never very good at it and my country is very flat), but I've skied some cross-country (including down smallish hills) last two winters.

I have recently acquired old non-shaped Kastle skis (my brother brought them from abroad as he bought them in a garage sale for $10). They are 195cm long and literally in mint condition (never used). Kastle RX-5 (or maybe it is RX-S) SL-3000 skis with Marker M38 bindings.

I'm going downhill skiing to Are, Sweden in a month.

Should I even bother bringing the old straight Kastles or just rent modern shaped skis instead?
Note my bold above.

You are in your mid-30's to early-40's. You live in the upper-midwest, possibly as far east as Ohio. You enjoy the outdoors, but skiing is too flat to be bothered. I'm guessing you enjoy fishing and hunting, should you have the opportunity.

Your trip to Are, is business. And, you should walk into a ski shop and ask to be fitted with a boot. then, ask to be fitted with a ski.

don't worry, Are will be fun.

Or--- you're from northern europe and your english rocks.
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Excellent deduction, the samurai, but a bit off. I enjoyed it immensely though.

I'm actually from Latvia (the Baltic states), my English is alright, and I'm 28. I enjoy outdoors but I don't spend enough time there. I have never hunted and I haven't done any fishing in 23 years.
post #14 of 19
my second guess about northern europe came from the "my country" and the lack of the word "the" before "last two winters."

Where do you currently reside? How did you pick up the lingo mint, smallish and should I even bother?

(I'm not a stalker, just a skier with a job in linguistics.)
post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
I didn't even notice the missing "the".

I currently reside in Latvia. I've been learning English since age 6 and probably have a slight gift for languages (I speak Latvian and Russian fluently and enough German, French and Italian to get by on vacations).

I've spent around 5 months combined in the U.S. on 8 different occasions, I've been exposed to a lot of music and movies in English, and I read a lot of English-language forums and news. Some of my bosses used to be American (from the West coast mostly) and we'd have daily teleconferences. On many topics I find it easier to read books in English than in my native Latvian.

Are "mint", "smallish" (which I'm not sure I even used right) and "should I even bother" special in any way, as in being characteristic of a particular region or background? I don't know how I have picked them up, to be honest.
post #16 of 19
"Mint" is either a type of ice cream or a denotation of a comic book condition (i.e. "My first issue of Spider-Man is in mint condition.").

Isn't Latvia where Dr. Doom was from?

wait, my bad. He was from Latveria (added "v").



I think I have an old issue of SKI where they went to Latvia to ski...nope, just found it and they went to Slovakia (is that anywhere near Latvia?)

If you are going to Sweden you should try and demo these bad boys:

http://www.hendryxskis.se/index.php?...43&Itemi d=36

I love the description and really want to try and pair!

There's quite a number of interesting Swedish companies out there, too (Extrem is another).



at any rate, have a blast!
post #17 of 19
mint is really upper-midwest US. (minnesota, wisconsin, ohio)

Smallish isn't very unique, except in how it was used. west coast would have used "small" You didn't make any grammar mistakes or anything, it just sounded like upper-midwest dialect.

"should I even bother" also sounds like a structure from the midwest that would be an equivalent to "should I even mess with"- west coast, or "should I be bothered"- aussie or kiwi or brit.
post #18 of 19
By all means, go with the shaped skis and stay on the short side ... and treat yourself to a one or two hour private lesson.

The lesson is critical. Shaped skis are easily turned ... the shape does much of the work with proper technique applied. However, that technique is much different (though easy), from anything you had been doing on straight skis of the past.
post #19 of 19
I'm from the upper midwest, and I use "mint" a lot, and "smallish" on occasion.
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