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Binding Torque test, how often?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
So I read quite a few post advocating having brand new binding torque tested.

That leads to my next question, do you need to have them tested again after some use?

If so, how often? Once a season? Or once how many ski days? Or only if you suspect something is out of wack (too late)?
post #2 of 23
I just get my bindings looked at before the season. I also test them whenever I go skiing by twisting my feet out of the binding to make sure they work.
post #3 of 23
I've never ever tested or had someone else torque test any bindings I've ever skied. I'm not saying go thou and do likewise, but I think annual torque testing is a shops way of making money off of paranoid skiers. When I was a tech, I never experienced a new binding failing a torque test and the very very few failures I ever had were due to wierd boot/binding interfaces and barely indemnefied ancient binders
post #4 of 23
i won't say 'never' or "always'. i will say it is uber rare for a 'new' binding to fail. Personally, i have torqued one pair of my own bindings in the past 15 or so years. It was a pair of 11-17 din 997's that I wanted to make sure that the binding released at a 11.
I have no problem setting any binding from the past 5 years at 10 and not worrying that it will eitehr hold me in or relase when need be.
post #5 of 23
Binding manufacturers recommend bindings be torque tested every 30 skiing days OR once per year, whichever comes first.

Binding failure is rare BUT I would rather have that discovered during a bench test rather than while skiing.

My ski area's risk management department required all skiing employees to have bindings checked every month or we could not work. They also allowed employees to choose higher settings than the chart suggested as long as you could demonstrate a release left and right out of the toe and vertically out of the heel on both feet. This ended as soon as the first person blew their knee out during this testing. Then you could claim "I" for independant and choose whatever setting you wanted as long as they tested out mechanically (of course the chart only goes to what....11).

Testing regularly offers piece of mind your equipment is working. If you don't care about your safety that much or are cheap, by all means skip this silly suggestion.
post #6 of 23
Never have mine tested.

I have bindings with 300 days on them and don't worry about it.
post #7 of 23
Hey baby, put your money on black and let it ride!
post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
Binding manufacturers recommend bindings be torque tested every 30 skiing days OR once per year, whichever comes first.

Binding failure is rare BUT I would rather have that discovered during a bench test rather than while skiing.

My ski area's risk management department required all skiing employees to have bindings checked every month or we could not work. They also allowed employees to choose higher settings than the chart suggested as long as you could demonstrate a release left and right out of the toe and vertically out of the heel on both feet. This ended as soon as the first person blew their knee out during this testing. Then you could claim "I" for independant and choose whatever setting you wanted as long as they tested out mechanically (of course the chart only goes to what....11).

Testing regularly offers piece of mind your equipment is working. If you don't care about your safety that much or are cheap, by all means skip this silly suggestion.
that must have been interesting.
post #9 of 23
Tested? Not like they are coming off my feet anyways, so why bother?
post #10 of 23
I had bindings on a couple of pairs moved to fit different boots (used demos) and the store I had it done at torque tested them (which they do every time) and as a result one pair is set .5 higher and the other 1.5 higher--so bindings DO go off.

BTW, store was skinet sports in burbank, a generally awesome place, and home to Claude, "the boot nazi", who also made my boots feel great.
post #11 of 23
Yes this is common cometjo, as a binding ages sometimes they need correction factors applied. The chart used during torque testing has an "inspection range" and a larger "in use range" which is a larger range within which the binding can test. The inspection range is the minimum and maximum range the binding can come within to be acceptable for the number it is set on. If the binding tests out higher or lower than this inspection range but still within the larger "in use" range the binding is still considered acceptable but a correction factor must be applied to the binding to get it to test out within the inspection range. Should the binding test outside this "in use" range it is considered unsafe and fails the tests.

I worked as a Sales/service rep for Salomon for a few years and tested many bindings and in my shop of 14 years as well. I can tell you there are certain brands and models, even new ones, that are very suspect when I see them and have historically tested poorly. The good news is most higher end bindings on the market today rarely fail when new and will test good for many days of skiing, but there are exceptions.
post #12 of 23
All of what bud said.

Testing bindings is simple, cheap, easy preventative maintenance.
post #13 of 23
Seems like everyone is all over the board on this one.

I am wondering why DIn seyttings cna be different on different mfgs since it is supposed to be a universal scale. I was set at 8 on Atomic and 6.5 on Volkl based on the same information.
post #14 of 23
Did you happen to turn 50 recently?

There are actually several reasons why that could be the case.
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tbarb View Post
Seems like everyone is all over the board on this one.

I am wondering why DIn seyttings cna be different on different mfgs since it is supposed to be a universal scale. I was set at 8 on Atomic and 6.5 on Volkl based on the same information.

Somebody made a mistake! There are four factors to proper release setting, height, weight, boot sole length, and age. Age is a factor in that if the skier is 9 or younger or 50 or older there is an adjustment up one skier code on the chart. The release setting should all be the same for all brands as this is an International standardization.
post #16 of 23
Interesting - I had though it all would be the same scale since it's an international standard and the 4 factors you list were all given as the same in each case. I think I'll ask what my DIN would be based o this info next time I'm in there and see if they give me the same number. I suppose the differeance of 6.5 and 8 is significant. I'm over 50 but 6.5 just seems low. Thanks.

------------------------
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
Somebody made a mistake! There are four factors to proper release setting, height, weight, boot sole length, and age. Age is a factor in that if the skier is 9 or younger or 50 or older there is an adjustment up one skier code on the chart. The release setting should all be the same for all brands as this is an International standardization.
post #17 of 23
The longer the boot sole the lower the number because of the added leverage created by the longer lever arm (boot). Once you turn 50 your setting will drop one number too. This is because they believe the day you turn 50 your bones become more brittle did you feel a little tinge on that birthday? That was your bones getting brittle
post #18 of 23
Here is another spin. Torquing a binding is a very good idea, especially if it gives you piece of mind. Get your binding tested, if you are supposed to be a "8", but like to ski a 10, so be it. See where the binding is set, if you get 8, 8.5, 7 and 8. Fine, them adjust your bindings accordingly.
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
Somebody made a mistake! There are four factors to proper release setting, height, weight, boot sole length, and age.
Actually, there are five. You forgot "skier type: I,II or III".
post #20 of 23
My bindings are torque tested at least once a year.

I have had bindings that failed the test after significant use.

JF
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tbarb View Post
I'm over 50 but 6.5 just seems low. Thanks.
We didn't ask that. We asked if you turned 50 in between these two settings.

Another factor at play is the difference between manufacturer's charts. For a given skier and boot combination, some charts command a higher setting than others in a small number of circumstances. You may, or may not be one of those circumstances. Also, as explained elsewhere, bindings are not simply set to what is on the chart, they are set to what provides the appropriate release value. A -1.5 or +1.5 adjustment isn't exceptional. If this were the case, it would (should) be noted on the work order.

If you want to know why the standard allows different settings for the same skier from different manufacturer, pay your money and read the ISO (no longer DIN) standards.
post #22 of 23
Well, no, you actually didn't ask that. But the meaning was obvious and understood anyway.
So there can be different settings for the same release value based on different mfgs equipment or different binding models. And so a '7' on one binding could be essentially the same as an '8' on another. Interesting. Still easy to double check though just by asking. Thanks.

---------------------
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
We didn't ask that. We asked if you turned 50 in between these two settings.

Another factor at play is the difference between manufacturer's charts. For a given skier and boot combination, some charts command a higher setting than others in a small number of circumstances. You may, or may not be one of those circumstances. Also, as explained elsewhere, bindings are not simply set to what is on the chart, they are set to what provides the appropriate release value. A -1.5 or +1.5 adjustment isn't exceptional.
.
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
Actually, there are five. You forgot "skier type: I,II or III".

whoops!:
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