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Hip Dysplasia - anyone know about this?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I have been having some pain in my right leg right in the crease at the hip.

I saw a PA who had an xray taken and diagnosed it as arthritis caused by hip dysplasia. The xray showed that (apparently since birth) there was only about 60% of the socket in contact with the head of the femur and thus extra pressure put on the cartilage.

The PA said it might come and go, and at some point might come and stay - at which point I'd need total hip replacement! :

I have already asked to see the Surgeon to confirm this diagnosis. I still think it could just be some tendonitis.

Any thoughts?
post #2 of 18
Hello Ski,

I too have arthritic inflamation in my left hip joint due to this condtion. I always noticed a bit of tenderness in my left hip at times but it wasnt until I was much older that it started to bother me. It wasnt until I turned 50 that it became an issue. I saw a physician and the diagnosis was made. I am now 57. I am pretty active. The arthitis comes and it goes. High humidity seems to aggravate this but cold seems to have no effect.

If it really is aggravated it is uncomfortable even to lay on my left side as it feels like there is a hot coal inside my hip socket when I put pressure on it. It is a deep ache when and if it flares up, and I walk gingerly. This is the extreme though. Most of the time when I notice it though, it just feels like a minor annoyance.

The physicians talked about possibily needing hip replacement surgery in the future but that is only if it becomes an issue that it interferes with my ability to function. Some people get along and manage the condition fine, others seem to have issues. I am hoping the former holds out.

Some of the sports I participae in and how it effects the condition:

Cycling - I like to cycle a lot in the summer and the motion of the pedal stroke can really aggravate it, especially if it is hot and humid. I swithced to a recumbent bicycle and it doesnt bother me as much, if at all.

Jogging - The bouncing and pressure can aggravate it and cause some discomfort. I stopped joogging a while back, not just because of this, but because my knees are not like they were when I was 20.

Softball: I am a lefty and noticed when I swing and launch off the left foot it can be a problem when I twist the hip forward off my stance foot. Also, hard sprinting for a ball after launching off the left foot can aggravate it. My hip always aches the night and day after a beer league game.

Skiing - As long as I don't do any wedges, no effect at all. I am not an advanced skier but have noticed no ill effects that aggravate the arthitis. The only time I notice it is if I try to do a wedge. It burns a little in the hip socket when I twist the skis into a wedge and can flare up the orbital joint in the hip. Other than that, none of the movements I use to ski seem to have any effect at all.

I hope this informartion helps a little. If the diganosis is correct, I wouldnt worry about it unless it becomes an issue. I don't know how old you are but the fact is we are all getting old and our bodies just don't work like they did when we were young. I find I just cant get away with the things I did when I was young.
post #3 of 18
skimangojazz before you let someone cut you open and introduce more arthritis look up were the U.S. ski team goes on there own. Dr Ongley on line .com his field is arthritis. In my op he can help you without cut into your body. He is the Picaso of diagnosing your problems. Check the endorsments by the U.S.Ski Team. Don't believe msnbc storey.
post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 
cvj we've read your posts before thank you. not going to mexico. i don't know what your agenda is, but your knee jerk reaction to anything that gives you an opening to talk about onlgey is getting a bit old.
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Paul, thanks for your post. I'm 55 and this just started this year, so I haven't skied on it yet. I am concerned about skiing at speed, due to the extra g forces on the leg, and about skiing bumps, which is something I was really planning on focusing on this year. If I have to ramp down my skiing intensity to avoid the pain, I will, but I really hoped I'd have another 10 years before I had to do that.
post #6 of 18
Sorry to offend you but have a good one in recovery and going through the motions of the medical establishment. I have no agenda. heard about dr thought the same as you for 15 years until I tryed it. Now he is my man for orthipedics. Just trying to give options.
post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 
didn't offend me cvj, your posts just seem suspicious.

So you have first hand experience? That would have more value if you cared to discuss it then your obtuse mentions. You went to Mexico for treatment? What did it cost you? What were your symptoms and results?

Hearing of a world class athlete with a lot of money to make by better performance using a questionable treatment has little value to someone like me who values my future health and sees no financial value in enhanced performance.
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
Paul, thanks for your post. I'm 55 and this just started this year, so I haven't skied on it yet. I am concerned about skiing at speed, due to the extra g forces on the leg, and about skiing bumps, which is something I was really planning on focusing on this year. If I have to ramp down my skiing intensity to avoid the pain, I will, but I really hoped I'd have another 10 years before I had to do that.
It's part of getting older I guess. We have to start dealing with stuff. It's really all a matter of what you can tolerate. I would just see how it plays out. I don't do high intensity or high level skiing so I can't really offer anything. For me high intensity is 25 mph, and never ski steep bumps out of fear for my life.:

Accept for skiing in a wedge or cycing, I never had too much pain while doing sports activites, it's usually repetitive motions and/or high humidity that seems to cause the most trouble. Also, it's usually when I stop doing what it is I was doing that it starts to really ache sometimes, especially that evening. Everything else is tolerable. I don't think the activites make the condition worse, I just gets more ache and pains as time goes by. It's been 5 years now and I certainly am not anywhere near the point I would consider hip replacement surgery.

I hope it works out for you. Best of luck
post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 
Paul, this truly is an amazing community here. Between your words of support and Si's on the thread linked to below (he had both hips replaced and offered support from that perspective.)

Some say the internet is one of god's greatest creations. Epic certainly backs that statement up.

Thanks - check out this thread if you haven't seen it.

Steve

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...067#post803067
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
Paul, this truly is an amazing community here. Between your words of support and Si's on the thread linked to below (he had both hips replaced and offered support from that perspective.)

Some say the internet is one of god's greatest creations. Epic certainly backs that statement up.

Thanks - check out this thread if you haven't seen it.

Steve

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...067#post803067
Very interesting post. From what I hear, the good thing is hip replacement is less painfull and way easier to rehab and recover from than the ACL surgeries and what not. In this scenario, nothing is really torn or broken apart, it's just a matter of replacing parts, and therefore not as traumatic as an ACL tear or fracture repair. It is easier to replace an axle on your car than to repair a broken one. I know one friend and one coworker who had the operation and they recovered quite quickly and were back to their normal activities quite rapidly. I also believe with today's technology the replacement is much stronger than the real thing so there might actually be a bonus there for a skier.

I would just have fun this winter and see how it plays out and not worry to much about it until it becomes an issue. If you decide you want/need the surgery, the worse that can happen is you just have to tone it down a bit this season and have it done in the spring.

I feel sorry for folks here who have injury that interrupts their skiing as they are much more passionate about it than me and it's more of a lifsetyle. For me, it's just something that keeps me active and outdoors in the winter and something to look forward to in the fall, so I would't take it as hard if it messed up my skiing.
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
still no reply from cvj about their first hand experiences with dr. ongly eh?
post #12 of 18
That's too bad, Mango. Sorry to hear about that. Glucosamine/Chondrotin pills are supposed to help arthritis. Sounds like your original equipment was defective, so if a replacement is down the line, think of it as an upgrade.

I don't think you should avoid bumps unless they make your hip hurt too much. If they are soft, round and well spaced, you should be able to use the very low impact technique Pierre demonstrated in the videos he posted. Having a good excuse to stay out of the bumps when they are icy, sharp and rutted is a bonus!

I hope you find that skiing doesn't make it hurt. Refuse beginner lessons if wedging hurts. Teach bump lessons.
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks telerod!
post #14 of 18
my cousin's husband (also a close friend of mine - world collided there has this same thing and he's my age - early 40s.

He has a family history of arthritis. He's torn over whether to have the operation now and enjoy himself now, risking having to have another one when he's 65 or 70 or wait til it gets bad enough to really bother him and maybe have it once. He started complaining while skiing a few years back and is an excellent skier, although it's slowed him down a bit.

The other thing is weight gain which he should probably work on first....
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
I have been having some pain in my right leg right in the crease at the hip.

I saw a PA who had an xray taken and diagnosed it as arthritis caused by hip dysplasia. The xray showed that (apparently since birth) there was only about 60% of the socket in contact with the head of the femur and thus extra pressure put on the cartilage.

The PA said it might come and go, and at some point might come and stay - at which point I'd need total hip replacement! :

I have already asked to see the Surgeon to confirm this diagnosis. I still think it could just be some tendonitis.

Any thoughts?
Well....Differential diagnosis of anterior hip and groin pain. Could be...
1)Lumbar strain/bulging disc
2)Hip pointer (contusion)
3)Adductor strain
4)Stress fracture femoral neck
5)Hip pathology (synovitis, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, subluxation, avascular necrosis)
6)Inguinal hernia

Not on the list but my personal opinion is that a sacroiliac (SI) dysfunction is present. IE either a forward, backward, or rotation of the ilium on the sacrum. This usually presents with groin pain, and pain, tenderness to the SI joint. It is usually a couple of these factors above. IE you have pain and start to move abnormally. You body starts to tighten, and shift, to compensate which creates other problems out and away from the site of origin.

Seeing a good PT will probably help, slow the arthritic process down.

You may find that injections of this can help. Used primarily for knees.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyaluronan

Avoid surgery if you can. Of course I am biased.

A prosthesis generally lasts, at its longest about 17 years, I believe. So if you are younger, you are looking at several revisions over the course of your life. The longest I've seen one last was 21 years, I think. This was in a geriatric women that was not very active. If you are active the parts wear faster. After total hip replacement jumping, jarring and bumping should be avoided. This causes premature loosening and wear of the device.

If you have complications that may limit having the surgery, you may want to have it sooner. Example, you can't tolerate anesthesia, because of heart or lung problems, that are progressively worsening.

Following hip replacement hip rotation is limited somewhat. Remember Bo Jackson? The pro baseball and football player. His career was pretty much over after hip replacement. He could not fully rotate his hips to swing the bat. Most of his power had to come from his arms, can't compete long like that.

Sorry for the length, hope that helps.
post #16 of 18
I have 2 friends who are skiers and in their early 50's who had congenital hip degeneration. Both of them opted for the hip resurfacing instead of a conventional hip replacement. They are both back skiing and doing well. They can have a hip replacement in the future if necessary. Don't jump into anything. Get it checked out by a good doctor. I know with the hip resfuracing, there are certain parameters and if you wait too long it may not be an option. Good luck.
post #17 of 18
Hip resurfacing is relatively new. None the less, a viable option. Some of the older techniques similar to resurfacing had problems with things splitting, shifting, and prematurly wearing out.

Articles on resurfacing.
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/552705
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/532211

OATS procedure another option?
http://www.emedicine.com/orthoped/TOPIC595.HTM
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone, Johnny good stuff - I will definitely bring these possibilities up with the doctor, if he ever gets back to me. The diagnosis I got was from an orthopoedic PA with an xray.

As to resurfacing, if indeed my problem is caused by dysplasia that wouldn't fix the problem, which is that the socket surface area is much smaller then it should be and all weight is being put on a smaller amount of socket.
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