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Need help choosing between two skis

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Hey everyone, I live in Whistler and will be taking my CSIA level 1 this year and probably level 2 later on. I won't be teaching this year but will probably teach part time next year, I've also been told its a good way to improve your skiing. So I don't know anything about what kind of ski I need, right now my everyday ski is a 184 Rossignol B-Squad. I'm a competant skier but technique is my achilles heel, I can get down anything but its not always pretty. I can't zipperline a mogul track. I'm 6', 160 pounds, 26 years old. So at the ski school there are a few pairs of skis for sale from instructors and there are two that seem suitable:

Head M75 170cm, 16.9m radius, 114-74-103. $150
Atomic Supercross 174cm, 18m radius, 106-63-96. $100

These skis will be for the courses and training but they definitely won't be my everyday ski. Both are in about the same condition and come with bindings on a plate, which should I buy? Or should I not buy either and keep looking? Thanks
post #2 of 21
Go with the M75. The Supercross (assuming its an SX11, thats what it sounds like) is a good ski, but pretty limited in what it likes to ski. It's way too narrow for Whistler, and as an instructor's ski, especially for the sorts of things you're going to be doing on a level 1 (lots of sliding, little carving), it's not what you want. The 75 is much more versatile, and will lend itself a lot better to the sort of skiing that will be demanded on your course and when you're instructing.

Good luck with the course, it sounds like you'll definitely benefit from it - you don't need to know anything about technique really, just as long as you're a reasonably competent skier you'll do fine. The level 1 can be a bit tedious at times since it's all very basic skiing, but it's worth it in order to get training for the higher levels, which will really improve your own skiing, not to mention sessions if you're on staff at a ski school (whistler has the largest collection of top notch trainers around, so there's always someone to help you out). Good luck!
post #3 of 21
CanuckInsructor nails the question yet again.
The atomic supercross is a great ski for carving at speed, but is not made for skiing sideways and not for slow speeds.
post #4 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks, but is the M75 a good ski for what I want to do (level 1 and 2) or is just that its 'better' than the atomic?
post #5 of 21
I would say it's a pretty good choice for that sort of skiing. It's been a few years since I've skied it, but while I wouldn't call it an outstanding ski in any category, it's a very good jack of all trades. For the type of skiing you're going to be doing and at your skill level I don't think you'll be let down. If you were out east I'd suggest something a little narrower for better carving performance, but in Whistler it's as good a choice as I can think of, especially at that price.

My advice is go with them now, I think you'll be very happy. It should certainly serve you well up to your level 2 and beyond, and by then you can think about a new pair.
post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 
well by the time i got in touch with the seller they were sold. i found someone selling xrc 1200's though for $300. twice as much, is that a good ski for me? a lot of instructors ski xrc's out here. if i were to get a pair which ones should i probably get and what length? they're all pretty cheap on ebay. i would like something that would also work well when i go back out east to tremblant over christmas holidays and when whistler gets hard and icey (which can be fairly often).
post #7 of 21
Can I ask where you find these skis for sale in Whistler? I'm on the look out to replace my carvers
post #8 of 21
IMHO, the XRC1200, like the Atomic SX11 or 12, is a great ski for carving it up back east, but not what you want for teaching and sideways skiing.
post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 
well im not so concerned with teaching, right now im doing my levels to improve and get the training, etc.. i just want to improve my technique. afterwards i'll decide if teaching is for me but it won't be this season and if its next season it'll only be part time. in order of importance:

1. a ski that is suitable for my skill level and will be ideal for training and earning my certifications

2. a ski that will be good on ice, that i can take back east and not struggle

3. a ski that is good for teaching with


jimlad: from a friend who's left ski school, if i don't buy them i'll let you know. not sure if he'd make you the same price though
post #10 of 21
If I had to pick a one ski quiver right now for back east it would be an SX11 or SX12; that would be the most fun.

For skill improvement a shorter radius might work better though (more turns per run = more practice).
post #11 of 21
Do you know what year the 1200 is? To see the difference go here:
06: http://www.untracked.com/p630c53b89l...pert_skis.html
07 & 08: http://www.untracked.com/p2081c11b89...flex_base.html

I ask because there are two skis called the 1200SW, in '06 it was a stiffer, more race like ski, whereas in '07 and '08 it's a little more versatile, slightly less stiff ski.

The original makes for a good instructor/training ski for someone with already strong technique, but I think that given how you describe your skiing, it would most likely just make things more difficult than is necessary.
The '07 model would be a bit better, but it still needs a good pilot.

IMO, either would still be better than the SX12, which really likes to stay on edge and in a specific turn shape more than is ideal. That said, I think that you could make any of them work for you, it's just a question of how easy it will be. If you need skis now and can get good deals on these, go for it.
post #12 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckInstructor View Post
Do you know what year the 1200 is? To see the difference go here:
06: http://www.untracked.com/p630c53b89l...pert_skis.html
07 & 08: http://www.untracked.com/p2081c11b89...flex_base.html

I ask because there are two skis called the 1200SW, in '06 it was a stiffer, more race like ski, whereas in '07 and '08 it's a little more versatile, slightly less stiff ski.

The original makes for a good instructor/training ski for someone with already strong technique, but I think that given how you describe your skiing, it would most likely just make things more difficult than is necessary.
The '07 model would be a bit better, but it still needs a good pilot.

IMO, either would still be better than the SX12, which really likes to stay on edge and in a specific turn shape more than is ideal. That said, I think that you could make any of them work for you, it's just a question of how easy it will be. If you need skis now and can get good deals on these, go for it.
I don't remember what the skis look like but they are at least 1-2 years old so definitely not the 07-08. If the 1200 is not ideal for me then which of the XRC series would be? I have two weeks before I need these so I can just buy a pair on ebay. There seems to be tons of good deals online.

I am definitely a strong skier, I can down almost anything at whistler so long as there isn't too much exposure. As far as pure technique and finesse is concerned, this is where I am lacking and hoping to improve by going through my levels and training. I would say I'm a level 2-2.5 as far as technique is concerned.
post #13 of 21
Most of my Canadian skiing is in the icy east; notice that instructors there tend to ski Heads (XRC800, 1200), Rossi's (OSx, Z9), Atomics (SX11, B5), Elans (Ripstick, Mag 12); my most recent skied SX11's, said that he looked for a ski that was comfortable enough to stay on all day and could carve a variety of shapes at lower (teaching) speeds. He was Level 3, big guy, maybe 6'2" and 220-ish, didn't believe in fat skis except for serious pow out west.

My own opinion as someone who takes lotsa lessons: You guys spend a LOT of time on groomed or inbounds chop/crud, even when you're teaching techniques for elsewhere.
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by quixotle View Post
I am definitely a strong skier, I can down almost anything at whistler so long as there isn't too much exposure. As far as pure technique and finesse is concerned, this is where I am lacking and hoping to improve by going through my levels and training. I would say I'm a level 2-2.5 as far as technique is concerned.
Sorry, I should have clarified - when I say strong skier I mean technique wise. It sounds like you'd have no problem handling them just cruising on your own, but I don't think the skis would do you a lot of favours when you're actively working on technique - in short there are better choices for where you are currently.

However given that you need them in 2 weeks, I would say go with the Atomics, those are great skis even though they wouldn't be my first choice for your situation, and it's hard to beat that price. Snap them up if you still can, and you've got something pretty good and you can take your time and wait to see if anything else tempting comes up in the future.
post #15 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckInstructor View Post
Sorry, I should have clarified - when I say strong skier I mean technique wise. It sounds like you'd have no problem handling them just cruising on your own, but I don't think the skis would do you a lot of favours when you're actively working on technique - in short there are better choices for where you are currently.

However given that you need them in 2 weeks, I would say go with the Atomics, those are great skis even though they wouldn't be my first choice for your situation, and it's hard to beat that price. Snap them up if you still can, and you've got something pretty good and you can take your time and wait to see if anything else tempting comes up in the future.
Yes you are correct regarding my technique but the atomics are gone So I have two choices, get the XRC 1200's in a 177 for $300.. or for about the same amount get any other XRC model online (i'd get them in time). So if i go the latter route, what would you say would be an ideal model and length in the XRC line?
post #16 of 21
The XRC 1200s would be the first choice probably, but you could also have a look for the 1400 Chip (similar to the new 1200, but a little more forgiving), or the 800.
Other suggestions:
Head Monster 77
Rossi B2
Nordica Hot Rod Modified
Fischer AMC 73
post #17 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckInstructor View Post
The XRC 1200s would be the first choice probably, but you could also have a look for the 1400 Chip (similar to the new 1200, but a little more forgiving), or the 800.
Other suggestions:
Head Monster 77
Rossi B2
Nordica Hot Rod Modified
Fischer AMC 73
ok sorry i'm confused, earlier you said the xrc 1200's would most likely make things more difficult than necessary since i don't have strong technique, and now you're saying they should be my first choice?
post #18 of 21
Sorry, I can see that being a little confusing. I'm suggesting the 1200 because it seems you can get it quickly and for a relatively cheap price. It's not ideal, but you can definitely make do with it I think. The other suggestions are mostly if you want to take more time hunting down a bargain.
Good luck on your courses!
post #19 of 21
Thread Starter 
ah thanks, one last question, i found another pair of xrc 1200's, this one is a 170 i believe, the first pair is a 177. both are the yellow 2006 version, what length should i get?
post #20 of 21
I think at 160#, you could go either way, but the 170 should be more manageable for performing the low end maneuvers you'll have to for your courses, so go with that.
post #21 of 21
Thread Starter 
thanks!
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