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A Few Beginner's Moves

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I have questions about the following "moves:"
  • How do you turn going downhill quickly and on a dime, like in moguls or slaloms.
  • How do you stop quickly and on a dime like after a downhill run.
  • How do you go uphill easily.
  • How do you increase your skiing speed (for both crosscountry and downhill).
Thanks for your help and time.
post #2 of 7
nice first post!
post #3 of 7
Welcome to EpicSki, SciGuy.

Note that rapid skiing downhill and in mogul fields are not really beginner activieies. Given that, turns and stops "on a dime" are maneuvers that require displacement of ski tails and application of edges in quick succession. These basically are parallel turn activities. You need to be in good balance on the skis, be able to both flatten the skis on the snow initially and turn them on edge smoothly and be able to make strong steering movements with both feet at once. If you are comfortable making skidded parallel turns on steeper green and shallower blue terrain, you can work on intensifying these movements gradually until you can skillfully stop or turn on that dime. Realize that it's not something you learn by attempting the sudden movements immediately, it's something you have to sneak up on by practice.

Depending upon your age and condition, going uphill on the snow does not get "easy". Two basic maneuvers are to sidestep up a grade and to "walk like a duck" with the tips splayed out, the tails turned almost together and engaging the inside edges (instep sides of your feet). Here again, practice improves performance.

Increasing your speed is another area where skillful use of your equipment comes with experience. You shouldn't try to go faster than you can control as a general practice. While there's a place for experiencing a "thrilling" pace down the slope, you want to be aware of safety for both yourself and others sharing the slopes. You are responsible for avoiding running into others.
post #4 of 7
scienceguy228,

To expand on Kneale's post:

Quote:
How do you turn going downhill quickly and on a dime, like in moguls or slaloms.
This is done by keeping the upper body facing more down the hill and turning the legs, feet and hips (partually) under it. Both skis must be turned the same direction at the same time. It could be done in a wedge, but it is easier parallel.

Quote:
How do you stop quickly and on a dime like after a downhill run.
The manuver is called a hockey stop and works much the way a hockey player stops suddenly. It is done by pivoting both skis 90deg to the direction of movement (while flat on the snow) and then progressivly adding edge angle as the legs absorb the energy that is disipated.

Quote:
How do you go uphill easily.
Kneale's answer is it, but there are 2 other ways other than side stepping and herring bone. One is to skate (only possible on a slight incline) and the other is to use a lift of some sort (the easiest).

Quote:
How do you increase your skiing speed (for both crosscountry and downhill).

For both cross country and alpine, moving across a flat or a very slight incline, to increase speed there are several things that allow you to accelerate. One or both can be done. One is to use the ski poles to push with and the other is to skate (much like on ice skates). A third option is the wax that you use. A qlide wax will increase acceleration along with an areodynamic body position (a tuck) and areodynamic clothing (speed suit).

It is good to know your abilities and terrain before tucking a slope for the reasons Kneale mentioned.

RW
post #5 of 7
None of the moves you are mentioning are beginners moves. What level are you?
post #6 of 7
"Excuse me can you tell me how to get to Carnegie Hall?"

"Yes, practice."
post #7 of 7
Lito's last version (2002 I think) of "Breakthrough on Skis" included a final chapter for true beginners. It had a great playful-oriented approach-one-footed skiing, etc-I think it's the best progression I've seen laid out yet (and Lito can write!)-it's worth checking out and it addresses all of your questions (though-as was already mentioned-the Hocky Stop is a more advanced beginner/ low intermediate skill that grows out of knowledge of other movements and strong upper body positions.).
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