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$1500 to spend, need boots, skis, & bindings

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
hey, I'm a level 9 skier. I can ski any trail on the mountain comfortably cept steep moguls. I love off piste, and high speed groomers

I ski sunday river, Killington, and Sugarbush, just about every weekend with a trip to colorado and one to Lake tahoe planned this year. I have never bought skis before, only rented, or used friends ski's.

5'11" 185lbs. looking for a good all mountain ski to handle crud, but still be doable for a few powder days out west.

I plan on buying used skis' and bindings, and getting a new pair of boots. What do you think is best for me... from what i read the volkl ac20s and ac3 unlimited look best for what i need.

anyone with others i should look into?
post #2 of 15
I would also take a look at the Head im78 or im82 ski.

As for boots, go see a good boot fitter; they are your most important piece of equipment. There is a boot section right below this section that has a list of reputable boot fitters across North America.

Edit: Also, there is a ton of great info on this site, so search function can be very helpful. Good luck!
post #3 of 15
Welcome to Epic! Like your priorities and suggest you search these forums for boot info, concentrate on boots that will give you what you need on the slope, not feel great in the store, then worry about skis.

OTOH not so sure I'd choose the specific skis unless you've demoed them and love them. Other skis to think about that can be had new (last year's) for $500-$800 (given $600 for boots, within your budget), and will bite on ice, float some in pow would include Volkl AC4; Fischer AMC 76, Nordica Modified or Jet Fuel, Atomic B5/11 or 11, Head iM77.

Sierra Jim, Dawgcatching, others here both sell skis and give solid advice; ask them for some ideas.

Good luck!
post #4 of 15
You could possibly buy AC3's and AC4's if you take the eBay route, with enough change left over for a good pair of boots. Poles needed as well?

The AC3 seems like a solid start for a ski for the North East. You never know what is avail on the mountains here, one day it could be 3 ft of fresh powder, next could be slush and ice. I took the AC3 out a few times at Loon last year (once late March, perfect conditions, then once after the April blizzard) and they held up really well on the groomers and in the powder. If you are to get one ski, the AC3 is the one.

If you would like to shoot for two pairs, one for groomer days and one for the powder is fresh, you migh want to look into a used pair of race skis and some mid waist skis for powder (ie, Karma).
post #5 of 15
$1500 is a good chunk of change. First step is to go to a good shop and buy great boots that fit well. Spend your next few bills demoing a range of different skis. Each trip you take do a little research on which shops stock good demos. Based on what you're liking and where you're skiing, buy one pair that you love. Either you'll find a deal or you'll buy from a shop from which you've demoed (most will credit your demo price toward a subsequent purchase). Don't worry about finding one ski that can theoretically do it all. Buy what makes you happy with the skiing that you're actually doing.

With your leftover money, plan another trip somewhere fun. As you get hooked, you'll figure out what you want out of your second pair...
post #6 of 15
Get boots that are just right. Don't scrimp. You've missed the best prices in September, but buy the right boots, not budget boots. Of course, if you can find just the right boot in last year's color at half-off list, grab it...because it is just right, not because it is half off.

If that crimps your budget, buy used skis. Your boots gott'a be just right. Buy the skis that demo best where you ski the most. If you're out west and it snows, rent fatties. All-Mountain skis really means that you ski equally mediocre-ly everywhere everyday. A few skis like Head i.SuperShapes are as close to true all mountain skis as they come. Head Monster 78s might be good for a Western skier who visits the East, but probably not vice-versa.
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by scmentz View Post
hey, I'm a level 9 skier.
Hate to burst your bubble.....
post #8 of 15
Get Goat
post #9 of 15
Get good footbeds with the boots.

If, as you say, you are happy with used skis, you should be able to get a few pairs. Even after the boots I could fill a car with decent skis for that amount of money.
post #10 of 15
you should be able to score a good deal on a pair of Blizzard Titan 9's (181 or 188cm)

Stiff, race-meets-freeride sticks.

If you're truly a Level 9 skier (though you've never owned your own gear?) then you should love these suckers. They have a 86mm waist and good edge hold, so they should be decent not only on hardpack and ice, but also in the soft. Talk to PhilPug, he owns a pair and LOVEs em. He's an EC hardknock, as well.

If you want to up your game opt for the Titan Pro, which is closer to 90mm in the waist and a bit longer in length.

Again, you should be able to track down a good deal on them as they were discontinued this year (Blizzard re-vamped their entire line-up). But they are a ripping ski.

You should easily be able to get a full set-up for $1500, factoring in about $700 for solid boots and then anywhere from $300 - $700 for skis and about $100 for bindings (you'll be able to score some Look or Rossi or Solly binders for around $150 or less if you look).

Good luck.
post #11 of 15
A good mid fat at a good price would be the Fischer AMC 79. I have them @ $499 new incl/bindings....that should get you up to a level 11 or 12 easy.

Assuming the already mentioned good boots of course.

SJ
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by scmentz View Post
hey, I'm a level 9 skier. I can ski any trail on the mountain comfortably cept steep moguls.
BWAHAHAHAHAHAH!

Um, er, sorry, but you fully deserved that.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by scmentz View Post
hey, I'm a level 9 skier. I can ski any trail on the mountain comfortably cept steep moguls. I love off piste, and high speed groomers.......

.......I have never bought skis before, only rented, or used friends ski's.
That's pretty impressive that you've achieved level 9 status with rental equipment and borrowed skies. You must have spent a lot of money on rental equipment over the years. What kind of boots were you renting? How many times have you skied in your life? This may qualify for a feature article in one of the ski rags!
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post
.... All-Mountain skis really means that you ski equally mediocre-ly everywhere everyday. A few skis like Head i.SuperShapes are as close to true all mountain skis as they come. Head Monster 78s might be good for a Western skier who visits the East, but probably not vice-versa.
You would be surprised to see the type of skis that excellent skiers are riding in the east. Monster 78's are fine.

I see lots of skiers skiing equally mediocre-ly on carving skis all the time. And the same on fatties, ... especially out west.
post #15 of 15
Back to the question. Boots are your most important purchase.

When we mention boots, we mean everything that surrounds the boot and insuring a good fit. A good boot fitter will ensure you get good fitting boots along with a custom foot bed molded to your foot. They will also check your stance and alignment and make adjustments to the boot. This will insure that when you are standing in a neutral position, your skis will be flat on the snow. They may also do some other things to the boots such as plane the bottoms if needed, etc.

Check the boot fitting forum - ASK THE BOOT GUYS - if you have questions.
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