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First trip out West, what should I bring? - Page 2

post #31 of 43
I was just kidding on the RedBull and vodka. Don't drink the first night and overdo the water if you can. Your body just gasses the water vapor out for some reason up there.
The Rockies are drier so (this might sound weird but) bring lotion for your hands and face.

Also you might want to train your cardiovascular system more - do like high heartrate workouts or intervals to bump your heart/lung capacity. OTOH if it's Whistler I don't think they're all that high up so the altitude might not be that bad. If it's Colorado you'll be in for more some effects because you'll be sleeping high up. The first night is usually restless for me.

There are stickies on all this somewhere on here.
post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
Yeah, with the amount of crap my GF and I lug around, I will surely have to pay, so its a given.
invest in a sporttube and ups ground it. Yes, it will cost $50 but you won't have to lug it and the kids. Much easier and sane.

BTW- Don't bring as much as you think you need! for a week: 2 pair of pants a 2-3 sweaters/shirts. Do laundry and just wear the same crap. Salomon snow clogs are all-purpose shoes wear them out there, no need to bring anything else. No one dresses up; even at upscale restaurants. Bring 1 ski jacket with layers to adjust for diff weather and 1 or 2 ski pants, I bring one insulated and one shell pant. gloves, best option is a moderately insulated glove with liners. Its much easier to start the day when its cold with the liners and then ditch them when it warms up. Camelbak is a must when east coasters go west, you will be losing huge amounts of moisture. Drink at least 8oz per hour of skiing. Always carry your boots onto the plane, get a transpack and carry on your ski essentials. Try to carry on at least your jacket, one pair of pants, goggles and gloves. If they loose your stuff, you can at least ski.

Still too much crap? Then UPS out a box of gear ahead of time to your place. Its your vacation so make it easy on yourself. Too many people ruin thier vacation in the airport......
post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by bklyn View Post
You will probably feel the altitude more than the average person because of your fitness level. Seems like it should be the other way around, but the fitter you are the harder it seems to hit. Combat this by going well over your normal intake of water a couple of days before you leave, as mentioned above.

You will be appalled at how much some of the natives have let the sun and harsh weather ravage their skin. While you are there use sunscreen, lip balm and moisturizer like it is your new religion. If there is a humidifier in your room, use it at night as well.

Altitude sickness has nothing to do with how "fit" you are.
post #34 of 43
Do Whistler before the end of Feburary. I was looking at snow fall totals and average freeze elevations and Jan and Feb seem to be the best times to go.

I went mid march and got rain alot at the bottom, but Whistler is FANTASTIC! Better than Vail in my opinion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ct55 View Post
a case of RedBull and a gallon of Stoli
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
post #35 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by TAH View Post
For the last 10 years that I have lived in Whistler full time from November to April, historically January gets more than it's fair share of precip, whether it be rain or snow, in comparison to Feb which with the exception of the 01-02 has gotten half if not less than half of the precip that January has produced.
I've lived in the PNW 20 years, and I've seen plenty of high pressure systems set up in January. Stating that February gets less snow on average does not negate the fact that the possibility exists of a January high setting up. In fact on of those years that January got more snow than February was 04-05, when the total snowfall was only 16 inches. I recall skiing Whistler that month, and no powder skis were needed.

Even in the recent past represented in those statistics, only one January got more than 100", compared to four years in which December got more than 100".

Last season, it was all about November. In 04, it was all about April. Trying to pin down a month and say there will be powder is a little strong.
post #36 of 43
Head RD iGS 185cm = 102/63/88
Head RD iSL 166cm = 119/64/102
Head iC300 177cm = 109.5/64/94

Assuming that you and your GF aren't speed-averse, I'd bring the GSes -- at least the length will give you stability and translate to a longer radius, if not a tremendous amount of float.

The iC300s are known for their edge hold on ice, right? Not exactly what you're hoping for on the big hills. Personally, I use my 177s only for early season and when it hasn't snowed in weeks.
post #37 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpinedad View Post
Head RD iGS 185cm = 102/63/88
Head RD iSL 166cm = 119/64/102
Head iC300 177cm = 109.5/64/94

Assuming that you and your GF aren't speed-averse, I'd bring the GSes -- at least the length will give you stability and translate to a longer radius, if not a tremendous amount of float.

The iC300s are known for their edge hold on ice, right? Not exactly what you're hoping for on the big hills. Personally, I use my 177s only for early season and when it hasn't snowed in weeks.
Yes and yes, thanks.
post #38 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
invest in a sporttube and ups ground it. Yes, it will cost $50 but you won't have to lug it and the kids. Much easier and sane.

BTW- Don't bring as much as you think you need! for a week: 2 pair of pants a 2-3 sweaters/shirts. Do laundry and just wear the same crap. Salomon snow clogs are all-purpose shoes wear them out there, no need to bring anything else. No one dresses up; even at upscale restaurants. Bring 1 ski jacket with layers to adjust for diff weather and 1 or 2 ski pants, I bring one insulated and one shell pant. gloves, best option is a moderately insulated glove with liners. Its much easier to start the day when its cold with the liners and then ditch them when it warms up. Camelbak is a must when east coasters go west, you will be losing huge amounts of moisture. Drink at least 8oz per hour of skiing. Always carry your boots onto the plane, get a transpack and carry on your ski essentials. Try to carry on at least your jacket, one pair of pants, goggles and gloves. If they loose your stuff, you can at least ski.

Still too much crap? Then UPS out a box of gear ahead of time to your place. Its your vacation so make it easy on yourself. Too many people ruin thier vacation in the airport......
Good stuff thanks.
post #39 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns View Post
Drink lots of water and hopefully you won't need it but some headache relief pills too. The altitude the first couple of days can do a number on some people. For the longest time I would feel bad the first few days and fortunately the past few years its pretty much stopped.
Ditto on this one. Preferably stay overnight in Denver and drive up so you can acclimate better. I about died the two times I went from sea level to 10,000 in a single day.

As for the skis, I'd leave all of those home and demo each day. Sounds like you can afford it anyway, and it'll lighten your load and risk of baggage loss. I am serious. Just bring the boots.

And sunscreen.
post #40 of 43
Rent fat skis. They make powder easier.
post #41 of 43
Sunglasses

Really, they are not optional on sunny days at altitude. Of course, dark goggles would be okay too.

First time I was out west (UT), I broke my Varney Cateyes (it was the '80s, what can I say) getting off the lift and had to head right back to the base to get new frames.
post #42 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by learn2turn View Post
Sunglasses

Really, they are not optional on sunny days at altitude. Of course, dark goggles would be okay too.

First time I was out west (UT), I broke my Varney Cateyes (it was the '80s, what can I say) getting off the lift and had to head right back to the base to get new frames.
Never leave home without them....and I still have my Vaurnets, in mint condition!
post #43 of 43
I've been skiing for 32 years, 16 of those in BC. Whistler/Blackcomb is my local ski hill and ski it all year on my Volkl G4's. I ski all over the mountain from groomers, crud, powder, bumps and off-piste without any problems. In my opinion, powder skis are too specific and are only good for heli or cat skiing.... completely pointless 98% of the time on chairlift operated runs!

Bring whatever you like to ski on, but i'd suggest your all mountains.
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