or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Snowboard injury studies

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Thanks for kewlguy's post in another thread:
Quote:
Here's an interesting study. It's on spinal injuries but they also include total number people admitted classified by boarder or skiers.

"A total of 7,188 patients sustained snowboard-related injuries, and 238 of these had spinal injuries caused by snowboarding (3.3%), whereas 6,302 patients sustained ski-related injuries, and 86 of these had spinal injuries caused by skiing (1.4%)."

http://www.jtrauma.com/pt/re/jtrauma...195628!8091!-1
Reading the study, one should not necessarily buy the conclusion without a few more answers about possible complicating factors such as:
the overall participation rate of skiers and snowboarders that led to those injury statistics
the total injury stats for that participation versus just those that were sent to that specific hospital
the methods used to teach beginners in each sport
the terrain used to teach beginners
the equipment used to teach beginners
the culture of the country where the study occurred
the location and severity of the spinal injury

We all know that beginner riders will make "slam" type falls more than beginner skiers will. But, in my experience, terrain choice, equipment and teaching techniques can make a huge reduction in the number of slams that beginners make. I'd like to see if there is any similar American data on snowboard injuries versus ski injuries or any studies that take some of the above factors into account. Otherwise one might be tempted to conclude that a person is almost twice as likely to be seriously injured while riding versus skiing (assuming 30% of participants are getting over 50% of the injuries)
post #2 of 7
Thread Starter 
Aha - Google to the rescue. Strange that a site called ski injury has cool snowboard injury stats just like I asked for, but it is appropriate since this forum is called EpicSKI, eh?

Here's a page about a Scottish study comparing skiing to skiboarding to snowboarding. Here's a general page for snowboard injury rates. Hmm - it seems like spinal injuries are so rare they don't even rate a category. Here's another page with more spinal injury studies.

Although I'm not ready to take anything from this as gospel, I did note that one of the studies said spinal injuries were 4 times more likely in snowboarding than in skiing. Another study noted that snowboard spinal injuries typically occur lower in the spine. It seems that comparing skier versus snowboard spinal injuries may be like comparing apples and oranges.
post #3 of 7
How many of those snow boarder "spinal injuries" are pulverized tailbones?
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
That's where "lower in the spine" comes from. The nice thing about this injury site is that it describes a lot of the mechanics behind the injuries. This is very helpful for people to understand what the risks are and possible strategies for avoiding those risks.
post #5 of 7
I see the slam so often and put my daughter in a half day lesson when I saw her do it a few times. The body slams forward and seemingly in a defenseless postion. It looked to me the biggest problem for beginning snowboarders is when they can't make a back side turn and attempt to pivot instead of changing edges. When they are perpendicular to the fall line the flattened edge catches and they slam down very hard sometimes.

It's painful to watch and the violence of the contact is very evident.

Aren't there a large amount of shoulder injuries common to snowboarding at any level ?
post #6 of 7
Pretty high numbers for injuries occurring in snow parks. One of the biggest (the biggest?) areas of growth is skiers taking to the park, or so I've been told. Mt Creek brought in a company whose specialty is designing and building terrain parks to revamp the whole terrain park theme. It will be interesting to see where park design goes and if injuries play a role in future design.
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
I see the slam so often and put my daughter in a half day lesson when I saw her do it a few times. The body slams forward and seemingly in a defenseless postion. It looked to me the biggest problem for beginning snowboarders is when they can't make a back side turn and attempt to pivot instead of changing edges. When they are perpendicular to the fall line the flattened edge catches and they slam down very hard sometimes.

It's painful to watch and the violence of the contact is very evident.

Aren't there a large amount of shoulder injuries common to snowboarding at any level ?
Broken wrists, shoulder injuries are probably the most common. We like to knock ourselves out quite a bit too. The "flyswatter" slam sucks in every way you can think of. It's been awhile since I have visited ski-injury.com, but they have great statistics and analysis of snow sports related injuries. My generalization could be off, but those were the injuries back then. They also show a slightly higher rate of injury for snowboarders. It makes sense, the sport has not been around nearly as long as skiing.

Skier's tend to do their lower extremities up nicely though and the skiers thumb. Ouch!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav: