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Best cities

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Anyone have an opinion on the best cities where you can meet young people (20's) into outdoor activities (skiing - a major emphasis here, hiking, mountain biking, etc) and still maintain a job?

For instance, crested butte is pretty much filled with outdoorsy people but it's pretty difficult to find a job if you're, say, a mechanical engineer. I live in Southern Maine, where there's a lot of outdoor activities, a decent amount of people into them (more old than young however), and there are a few jobs, but there aren't any channels for meeting people, like clubs and organizations, particularly if you're younger. If you don't know people from growing up or through work you're pretty much sunk.
post #2 of 21
Boulder? Denver? CO Springs?
post #3 of 21
In no particular order... Vancouver BC, Seattle WA, Portland OR, Calgary AB, SLC UT, Denver CO, Innsbruck, Salzburg, Geneva, Zurich, Munich, etc.
post #4 of 21
Why not move down to Boston? Perhaps it's not ideally what you are looking for but it's a good start. It would be a very easy move for you, and would also allow you to do a job search before commiting to a move. It's one big college town and lots of students end up staying here, so there's a healthy twentysomething population. You can day trip to almost any skiing in Maine, New Hampshire or Vermont, plus you have a lot of young professionals who put together group ski houses for the winter, which are a blast.
post #5 of 21
Boise belongs on that list too. We have skiing, biking and hiking nearby as well as great access for watersports. Employment opportunities are also very good, but we have been suffering through the recent high tech slump. We have four NYSE corporations headquartered here, two large hospitals, a large university and all of the state agencies that go along with being the state capital.
post #6 of 21
That's the right track! I would think his request could be fulfilled in any city in the mountainous west with reasonable infrastructure, a good university, and progressive community leadership.

The preceding lists should probably also include Albuquerque, Spokane, and Reno. I am sure many others fit the profile, but much of that boils down to personal and career choices.
post #7 of 21
Why not stay put and try a different approach? You have a job in an area with lots of outdoor activities near Boston and Portland.

Yep there are more people older than you doing stuff like skiing and mountain biking. This is probably due to the fact there are so many baby boomers.

Meeting available women who enjoy outdoor actvitities is always a challenge. The western cities have the same challenge, well with the exception of Salt Lake City but that's a another story.

Try joining a club that focuses on activities you enjoy such as the AMC or join arecreational race club and ski Shawnee mid-week at night. Try something like match.com, there are lots of women in your area. This sounds lame, but try taking an art appreciation, language or dance class at night.

99% of the time with relocating, your troubles and worries slip in with the rest of the luggage and show up in the new area.

Good luck with what ever you decide! We go this way but once, make it worth while.
post #8 of 21
Ever try Church? If you're not into the bar sceene, then I always figured church groups had the best selection of nice girls. Believe it or not?

You can find one in just about any town.
post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice everyone. The reason I'm asking is because I'm trying to figure out what to do next with my life.

I graduated a year and a half ago, hoping to find a job somewhere outside the northeast, since I've been here all my life. Didn't work out and here I am back in the same town I grew up in. I'm happy to have a job, but I don't really like it and my social life's been pretty rough as well.

I made a couple friends here at work who actually are into the things I'm into but they're both on extended business trips till next spring.

I know I need to find a more interesting job and preferably somewhere else.

I'll probably be here a while considering the job market, so I plan to take some of Talisman's advice. I raced in a beer league last year but the next youngest person was in their early 30's (I'm 23). I'd like to take some salsa dancing lessons, but I'll probably have to drive down to Boston to do that. That would be worth it though.

Really I'd love to have a few friends to ski with and hang out. I know there are people my age who do, I just don't know how to meet them.

What's the best way to find people to share a ski house? Craig's List? I have a season pass to sunday river so I'd be interested in that.

Sorry to sound so negative and for the length.

By the way; I tried church for 15 years.
post #10 of 21
You need to tap into the SR 'house scene' which must exist. I have skied SR many times, but never was around long enough to connect with that group, but have at other areas in NH and VT.

Plan A:
If you are a decent skier.

Contact the patrol director at SR and ask about becoming a patrol candidate. Some weekends you will be ablke to ski with the patrol or mountain ambasadors, but you will meet good skers on the patrol and meet other people, find out about parties and the like. You will also learn about mountain skills, people and first aid.

Plan B
If you are nice guy:

Volunteer with the SR disabled skier program. Be a guide for the blind or what ever. You will again meet a new group of people and be in circulation.

Plan C
If you know left from right

Take the salsa lessons or another type of dance that involves touching. I recommend 'swing' as the lessons and dances are usually lots more women than men and they don't mind you stepping on your toes. Try www.swingmonkey.com for particulars in your area. The worst that will happen is you will meet people and learn to dance. I know tough guys don't dance, but you will popular at the next wedding reception because you can dance.

Plan D
If you can go to a night class.

Get a course catalog for USM or whatever is near Sanford and look at creative writing, art history, Italian or French, poetry or ornothology (bird watching) night classes. Local Adult Ed is another good area for dance, cooking or language classes.

Plan E
Decent on skis

Switch from beer league skiing to mixed skiing. This is tough because the ratios aren't in your favor, but most beer league teams are are all men and you may be better off just going to drink with the vets at the American Legion hall.

Plan F
Get in shape!

Take some aerobics classes at the local Y the classes are mostly female, but you need to play it cool. Come off as a wolf or a starer you will alienate people. Wear SR T shirts and let it be known you are a ski guy. That middle aged, slightly over weight and married woman who is next to you may have a lean 24 yo daughter who is too busy in Law school to meet a gut to ski with.

Soon you will be a babe magnet and be asking us next how to nicely set free the hotties you just don't have time for!

There are just too many of us gummy old baby boomers, but we know people who are younger than us.
post #11 of 21
Add DC to the list. Ok, I am not completely insane, just partially. In all seriousness, DC is a Mecca for young people who come here to go to school, work in the gvt., for international organizations and embassies, or in non-profit foundations and think tanks. Moreover, most young people are new to the city, so there’s no “local scene” to break into—everyone is a non-local and looking for new friends. Meeting friends should not be difficult—especially if you have hobbies. On that score, outdoor activities such as hiking, cycling, sailing, rock climbing, kayaking, and mountain biking are huge here.

Ok, now the downside. The skiing is not on the same level as CO or even NH. But WE HAVE LOCAL SKIING. Repeat, local skiing exists in this region. To really satisfy your snow fever, plan on traveling further a field a few times a season, but that’s not hard given DC’s hub of airports. We have three major airports: SLC or Denver are less than 4 hours from here by plane. Southern VT is under 8 hours by car and Europe is just a 7 hour plane ride away.

[ October 14, 2003, 11:19 AM: Message edited by: West Virginia Skier ]
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally posted by West Virginia Skier:
Add DC to the list. Ok, I am not completely insane, just partially. In all seriousness, DC is a Mecca for young people who come here to go to school, work in the gvt., for international organizations and embassies, or in non-profit foundations and think tanks. Moreover, most young people are new to the city, so there’s no “local scene” to break into—everyone is a non-local and looking for new friends. Meeting friends should not be difficult—especially if you have hobbies. On that score, outdoor activities such as hiking, cycling, sailing, rock climbing, kayaking, and mountain biking are huge here.

Ok, now the downside. The skiing is not on the same level as CO or even NH. But WE HAVE LOCAL SKIING. Repeat, local skiing exists in this region. To really satisfy your snow fever, plan on traveling further a field a few times a season, but that’s not hard given DC’s hub of airports. We have three major airports: SLC or Denver are less than 4 hours from here by plane. Southern VT is under 8 hours by car and Europe is just a 7 hour plane ride away.
Misery loves company! What are you doing encouraging people to move here? You know we don't have room for even one more car on the beltway.
post #13 of 21
I don't have an answer for you but I can empathize w/ you vis a vis the rural new england scene, living as I do in one of those small towns. It was quite a shock for me as well to return from a college community to discover how things are. One thought regarding location of employment as a mechanical engineer: you may have greater flexibility of location than you realize. It is often difficult for architectural firms doing work in resort areas to find suitable consultants such as mechanical egineers, electrical egineers, structural engineers etc. You might be suprised at the opportunities available. One of our consultants, for example, moved up here from New Jersey, is able to link up w/ other engineers via the internet and does s pretty busy practice.

Other than that, I don't know, get involved with activities which reflect your own real interests. This may involve some travel. Lets face it, the interesting locals you'll meet are already married. Others are likely to be uneducated and coarse (read "redneck"), Unless you're really interested in becoming familiar with their ex's and their own drinking/family violence ad nauseum histories I would totally avoid the bar scene. My vote would be for some place that is a college/university community. Those places tend to attract the multitudes of interesting people who do not live where we choose to live for reasons of natural beauty, skiing etc.
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally posted by JohnH:
Boulder? Denver? CO Springs?
Boulder, YES, Denver, Yes but Colorado Springs? Only if your extremely conservative.
post #15 of 21
Talisman has some good advice.

Ski Patrollers are HOT HOT HOT!!!!!!!
post #16 of 21
well try sacramento area in sunny california. From all my east coast friends who go to school here its a great change people are more laid back in general. Im making an assumption that you are a mech engineer and i am studying mech engineer at Ucdavis about 5 minutes out of sacramento which is about an hour away from lake tahoe. There are lots of engineering positions open here abeit mostly civil engineering firms. In the summer some of our ski resorts turn into great mountain biking sites and davis( where i live) has more bikes per capita than any other city in the US of A (yes a sad statistic). Anyways lots of young uns college students here and in sacramento something else to consider.
post #17 of 21
I'm surprised that nobody's mentioned BURLINGTON, VT! Awesome, very hapening scene there esp. for someone your age. You have Stowe 40 min. south; Jay Peak, Sugarbush, and MRG all w/in an hour+. Of course UVM and other local colleges are there, but Burlington is so much more than that as anyone who's spent time there can attest. The waterfront with sailboats, ferries and some sizable yachts and research vessels makes it almost like a mini-Seattle with mountains and watersports all in one place. Great mt biking, kayaking, Montreal is 90 min away, Boston 4 hrs. Jobs are the question mark but it seems like its a booming place and would have a lively job market. Maybe some Burlington bears or UVM or St. Mike's alums have info about jobs.
post #18 of 21
Not sure how you feel about coming north, but I can verify Calgary fits your description dead on. Its a young city - pop. ~1 million w/ a good chunk of them in the 25-35 yo range, less than an hour to get deep into the Rockies and a huge demand for engineers. It's also a very friendly city, you would have to work at NOT meeting people.
post #19 of 21
You also might want to check out Seattle.
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally posted by lifer:
Boise belongs on that list too. We have skiing, biking and hiking nearby as well as great access for watersports. Employment opportunities are also very good, but we have been suffering through the recent high tech slump. We have four NYSE corporations headquartered here, two large hospitals, a large university and all of the state agencies that go along with being the state capital.
Ha ha that lifer. What a kidder. Pay him no mind he's on crack (yet again). Nothing here in Boise. Good luck with your hunt. Scratch Idaho off that list....

Lifer - ixnay on the oiseBay romotionpay uisnessbay!
: :
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally posted by Lars:
Ever try Church? If you're not into the bar sceene, then I always figured church groups had the best selection of nice girls. Believe it or not?

You can find one in just about any town.
I love mormon girls [img]smile.gif[/img] come out to slc

duke
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