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the 11th minute of the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month....

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
This has two meanings for me...

It represents a time to remember those of our loved ones, family members and friends, and those whom we shall never know, who have given the ultimate sacrifice to provide us with the many freedoms we currently enjoy.

Stop for a minute or two today and thank a vet, remember a vet, or just stand in awe of what those men and women who have died in war all over the world have provided us.


(and it also marks, to almost the exact minute, when two years ago I shattered my leg.)
post #2 of 23
post #3 of 23
Thank you Vail, wonderfull post.

I am a Vet of the Gulf War, and extremely proud of it.

Theres lots of Libs on this board so this thread will probably get some flames, even today.

But who cares, today is for those who have sacrificed everything, so that the world might become a better place.

The American Soldier is the greates soldier in the world. I would know, not only from my own experience, but the continuing experiences of my friends and family in the service, and in Iraq today.

Contrary to what John Kerry would have you believe, our military today is the smartest, best educated, most diversified, best paid (though still underpaid) military in our countries existence.

Go USA!
post #4 of 23
I go the other route..I watch Spinal Tap and coordinate it that the "Goes to 11" scene comes on at that point.
post #5 of 23
Something new for me this year:
I've volunteered to help a group of school kids honor veterans.
It was the kids who said, "lets to it at the 11th hr"
Its good to see kids with the inspiration, and knowledge to understand THIS veterans day!
To those bears who've served, the least I can do is say....
Thank you!!
post #6 of 23
pattongb, liberals also respect and appreciate the sacrifices that soldiers have made for our country. our gripes are with the politicians who put soldiers at risk unnecessarily. if the Dick Cheney's of the world had ever served our country they would choose their battles differently.

i don't expect anyone to flame this thread. my heart goes out to the veterans who have given so much to this country.
post #7 of 23
as a massachusetts liberal, i agree with smj 100%
post #8 of 23
pattongb,
Thanks to you and all of those like you the rest of us can have these discussions.
Thank you for your service.
post #9 of 23
I was on my way out for a haircut at the usual place today and my wife said they were giving free cuts to vets today!

They were so nice .... and I felt a bit pampered .. and even got my picture taken for the local paper.

Thanks to all .... who have taken a moment ... despite politics ... to say thanks.

post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by pattongb View Post
Thank you Vail, wonderfull post.

I am a Vet of the Gulf War, and extremely proud of it.

Theres lots of Libs on this board so this thread will probably get some flames, even today.

But who cares, today is for those who have sacrificed everything, so that the world might become a better place.

The American Soldier is the greates soldier in the world. I would know, not only from my own experience, but the continuing experiences of my friends and family in the service, and in Iraq today.

Contrary to what John Kerry would have you believe, our military today is the smartest, best educated, most diversified, best paid (though still underpaid) military in our countries existence.

Go USA!
To politicize a holiday and special day of thanks for those that served our country is the highest form of B.S.

I am one of those libs but I am also grateful for those that served to protect our country and all it stands for.

Thanks Vets. May our government provide all they promised and what you rightly deserve. Patriots all.
post #11 of 23
Let's not forget the heroes of the 10th Mountain Division. Not only did they fight for our freedom, after the war, they helped open many ski areas throughout the country.

I had a nice surprise the other day. The mother of one of my Snowboard Outreach kids is a realtor. One of her clients has a pair of 10th Mountain Division Skis that she is donating the Summit Historic Society.

BTW, over at the Carter Museum, we have a Dick Dorrance video that shows him training the paratroopers. If you are in Breck on a Thursday, stop by the museum to see it. Admission is free!
post #12 of 23
I'll never forget receiving my cousin Raymond back home from Nam in 1968. He proudly wore his uniform every where we took him and got treated like cr-p for it by many folks we met. I was only 14 and it made a deep impression on me. Meanwhile, my brother was still over there serving as a USMC infantry officer. Tough as the current times are, we have to keep supporting our troops while we hash out political stuff. Vietnam was much tougher because we didn't.

Vet's Day Tribute Quiz: This trail is named after the US Army's elite fighting force that Raymond served with. Name the trail and ski area it's at: http://www.explorenewengland.com/tra...g/IMG_0426.jpg
post #13 of 23
10'th Mountain at Whiteface (glades)
post #14 of 23
I too remember the terrible treatment the Vietnam Vets got in the late 60's and early 70's. I think that is why those of us who opposed that war, and this one - are so committed to not repeating those mistakes, and seeing today's soldiers as strong and heroic men. In spite of the errors of the government.
post #15 of 23
I've started a few 'thank a vet' threads over the years and my political drift is to the left. My family has been in this country since colonial days and my ancestors have served in just about every major war this nation has seen. I am not a veteran but my appreciation for their sacrifice and service is no less sincere because of my political convictions.

To the Greatest Generation, my father, uncles and step-father, I can't imagine what this world would be like if not for your heroics. To my brother, a Vietnam vet, my deepest thanks for surviving that war and having the courage to speak out against it when you came back to the world. To his son, my nephew, a Gulf War vet, I'm so glad that the war you served in had set goals and an exit strategy, your generation's service restored this nation's faith in the military. To all you Iraq War vets, my deepest thanks for service in an unpopular war, we know about that. I hope your efforts will be fulfilled.

Veteran's serve so that we may be free, thank you all.
post #16 of 23
This is a nice thread and I appreciate the diversity of patriotic posts. As you may have heard Lt Michael Murphy was recently awarded (posthumously) the first medal of honor by anyone serving in Afghanistan. He was also the first medal of honor winner by a Navy member (he was a SEAL) since the Vietnam War. In case you are interested here is an excerpt from a heartbreaking account of his actions and that of 3 comrades in the face of extremely difficult circumstances. The dilemmas these young men face are unfathomable to me as I sit in my comfy family room. But I am grateful for what they put on the line:
http://www.navytimes.com/news/2007/0...cerpt_070618w/

Answer to my quiz is Green Beret trail, Jay Peak Vermont.
post #17 of 23
First, let me say thanks for your service to every vet out there. It doesn't matter what you did in the service, every job was important. You were underpaid, underappreciated, overworked, and most of the time, overtired.

All of us know that we certainly don't do it for the money and we don't do it for a specific political leader. It's amazing how your political ideas and ideals change when your perspective changes. I got out of the service after 20 years in December 2002. I served in 3 combat tours that I can talk about. In the end, you do what you do for the guy next to you.

For those that think liberals don't appreciate the individual efforts of the people who serve, I think you're wrong. Although protesting in public is not my style, I also don't agree with the political "minds" that got us into this mess and now can't get us out. Before I left, I saw some evidence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. I am still convinced it was the real deal. But that does not seem to have been the goal of OIF. But, alas, I'm straying of of my point. I don't think there's an educated person in this country that does not appreciate the individual sacrifices that our servicemen make, regardless of political bend.

Again, I say thanks for your service.
post #18 of 23
My 2 boys and I joined my 87 year old father (who served in WW2) to pay respect to those who gave their lives for our freedom.

This video always strikes a chord with me

http://youtube.com/watch?v=f4NZsD0zjAQ
post #19 of 23
Today marks the first time since my father returned from WW2 that he was unable to make it to the cenotaph.

In his honour, we attended and remember
post #20 of 23
Bee, that's the symbol I'm more used to seeing.


In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep,
though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.
(John McCrae, May 1915)

http://www.greatwar.co.uk/index.htm gives a little bit more information on what was called "the war to end all wars"

Wilfred Owen was another great war poet, this being his most famous work: http://www.warpoetry.co.uk/owen1.html
http://www.warpoetry.co.uk/owen1.html
post #21 of 23
BeeCeer, thanks for the reminder of something so simple that has a big meaning.
post #22 of 23
What's lost here is the real appreciation for those like my Father, "The Greatest Generation" who gave their souls to the tune of 10,000 dead every day, for their dreams of freedom and security for Euorpe, the Pacific and the rest of the world. I doubt this country would allow any war to produce that many dead American soldiers again. News coverage here would show the shock and awe of war as it does now and the American public wouldn't support it at any cost. Such is this present day war. Vietnam was the first time war was brought to our breakfast and dinner tables thanks to TV coverage. Showing all our spouses and families what was happening to Daddy overseas. What war is all about. Had there been TV coverage of WW2, it would have ended much sooner. The world's borders may have been much different than they are today, but it would have ended sooner.

I served at a time in a war that was not supported by the people of many countries. It wasn't popular with those of us who served either. But, many of us didn't have a choice. I just want to say that I hope to God that the new generations of young people here understand the sacrifice made for them to have the choice to say, I'm not going to serve our country for any reason.

God bless those who served as our forefathers, the "Greatest Generation" for there will never be another like them. Patriotism has a new meaning today.
post #23 of 23
Never forget the sacrifices; never forget or forgive the idiocies and ambitions of governments that put millions of young people in early graves.

I am liberal by inclination but have no issue with the armed forces. There are things worth fighting for.

My issue is with the fact that far too often our servicemen and women are sent to fight for things that aren't worth it ... and the decisions are made by men (overwhelmingly men) who risk nothing but stand to gain from others' blood.

But that's just me.

My newspaper office, on edition, was silent as the grave for two minutes at 11am yesterday.
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