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Vermont Residency

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
Our 17 y.o. daughter may be starting Univ. of Vermont next year, and she wants to establish residency as soon as possible (which, as the payer of tuition I heartily endorse). Does anyone have experience of being a UVM student and establishing residency, how to best do it and what the requirements are?
post #2 of 24
I believe you have to own property in that state.
post #3 of 24
I looked into it when my son was thinking of going to UVM. As I recall, it wasn't easy to establish residence, even if I moved to Vermont, which was possible for me then. I doubt that owning property is a requirement, and I'm pretty sure it's not sufficient in any case. They are not in the business of giving away cheap educations to out of staters.
It reminds me of a story I've heard from friends who've moved to Vermont. I child was born in White River Junction, NH in 1899, and his family moved across the river to Vermont when he was 9 months old. He died at the age of 101, and the headline on his obituary read "FLATLANDER DIES IN VERMONT"

Regards, John
post #4 of 24
Here is a link to residency information from the University's website: http://www.uvm.edu/~uvmppg/ppg/student/resregs.html

It looks difficult to establish a case for instate tuition without having lived in the state for a year before enrolling.
post #5 of 24
First ... excellent choice of schools. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

It makes sense that the requirements are quite difficult, otherwise people would be nuts not to do it considering the gap between in and out of state tuitions.
post #6 of 24
My dads pals relocated (General Electric Co.), back in the early 60's. They returned after being shunned in the classic Amish fashion. No one would deal with them, the wives, right down to the kids in school.

I've seen a bit of this .... my "favorite" was when asking directions, "now go left at the Catholic church". After several repeat attempts to recreate the route (I couldn't find ANY church). Another more friendly local advised me that the church burned down in "60 or so and if ya lived heeeeah, y'd a known that".

Hell, when you ask, most of the "friendly locals" are Jersey or Noo-Yawk transplants.
post #7 of 24
Used to be (back in the 70's) you had to live in-state full-time for 2 years before starting school and had to show proof - driver's license, poll tax, property tax, etc.

My dad was born and raised in VT and then went into military but kept VT plates on the car, voted in elections (absentee) and I got my driver's license in VT. I qualified (we were living Mass at the time), but not without a fight.

I loved UVM, but my kids aren't going there. I did not maintain my residence (I went into the military too and my parents had moved to NH by the time I graduated - NH resident for the last 20 years). Now I'm a New Yorker. SUNY schools are just over $4000 per year. UVM out-of-state...well, you know better than I.
post #8 of 24
Some states have reciprocity agreements w/ neighboring states. Minnesota, for example, used to and maybe still does have an agreement with Wisconsin that allowed residents to attend Wisconsin schools at resident rates, and vice versa. Of course thats the progressive Midwest for you, sigh. Knowing my home (New Hampshire)state's abysmal commitment to education, I doubt such agreements exist here, although its worth checking into. Massachusetts and Vermont may have such a thing.
post #9 of 24
I wish we lived here long enough, she could use our address as "home".

It's a crime that you get penalized for wanting to get an education in a different state than the one your parents live in. What difference does it make? If you have good schools in your state, you'll have the students. If not, then you need to Fix It instead of running a half baked college no one wants to attend.

What if your field of study isn't offered in your home state? (Mortuary Science is not offered in a lot of states, this I know). You have to leave home, work a shit job for a year (or 2), to get residency, just to save MONEY? Isn't an education just for that....an education? Or is it just a money making tool for the state? Who gets the excess "out of state tuitions"? What are students learning from that greedy little "rule"?

UNITED States? Hardly.

[ October 23, 2003, 07:06 PM: Message edited by: Bonni ]
post #10 of 24
Seems to me that a state school is supported by the residents of that state through their taxes. Why should they (like California) be penalized and have to support a child from out of state. Moving in for a year in order to qualify for residency and get a cheap education is a slap to the local folks.

In an area like Vermont that has little by way of an industrial foundation to provide a healthy tax base that is a burden that they couldn't possibly shoulder.

What I DONT like is Vermont allowing the Norwegan racers who don't make the cut in Europe to race here in the US. That erodes the base of our own national team. Heck, in Norway, you can't even own land unless you are a citizen.

PS ... wife is Norsk ... nothing personal .. Stein is still my childhood idol.
post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally posted by arcadie:
Some states have reciprocity agreements w/ neighboring states. Minnesota, for example, used to and maybe still does have an agreement with Wisconsin that allowed residents to attend Wisconsin schools at resident rates, and vice versa. Of course thats the progressive Midwest for you, sigh. Knowing my home (New Hampshire)state's abysmal commitment to education, I doubt such agreements exist here, although its worth checking into. Massachusetts and Vermont may have such a thing.
A similar thought. Some states will allow you to go for in state tuition from out of state if the state school in your state does not offer your planned course of study. When I was at UA I knew a kid who did not want to go to LSU. He wanted to be an engineer so he picked an engineering discipline not offered at LSU and got all his required non-major classes under that program before switching to his real major at the the end to take the classes in the major he wanted and only paying out of state rates for a short time.
post #12 of 24
I did this when I went to school in PA. I told the school that my residence was with my Grandparents address that lived in PA. I am not sure if you have relatives or friends that live in VT that you could put down as the address. They just send mail and the tuition bill to that address, so whoever lives at that address can just forward the mail onto you. I only had to do that for a year, because I moved out of the dorms into a house the summer before my sophomore year and established my residency in the town I went to school. If you do not have any friends or relatives in VT, my best advice would be to have your daughter move into a house or apartment as soon as she can so she can establish her residency as fast as possible. PA was a year, I think, but I am not too sure what they have in VT. As mentioned in other posts I believe she would have to get a VT License to truly establish residency. Good luck!
post #13 of 24
Getting a VT license is no problem (or at least wasn't back in the mid 90's). I had one by just giving my dorm address one year. A lot of students got them as most liquor stores wouldn't sell you booze without one. The other option was a liquor ID which took awhile to process - CW had one iirc.

The tax issue is precisely why education costs more at state universities for out of state students. Vermont has a very small population, and one of the lowest (if not the lowest) median income levels to draw tax dollars from. That means their university needs to draw funding from other places to survive and cater to the needs of not only their own in state students, but those out of state students who wish to attend. It would hardly be fair for the residents of Vermont to shoulder the burden of students from other states. It is not a money making tool for the state, it is a cash generation tool for the state. UVM and most state schools are very financially challenged as it is.

Most out of state students do not choose UVM for the pure educational benefit anyways. It can easily be argued that UMass Amherst, UConn, and Rutgers (the state schools were most of the UVM out of staters are from) are on par academically. Students go for the other things...snow, outdoors, atmosphere, etc. In choosing that they should have to pay more as well.
post #14 of 24
Send the kid to UMASS, or pay the $$$ - what is the sense of having residency requirements?
post #15 of 24
NewHampie:

The: "The Live Free or Die" motto does not mean that you get to live free from the toil and labor of others.

You Mass types live in relative luxury compared to your neighbors to the north. I guess it's easy to skip across state lines and grab a "freebie", but that's hardly the spirit of the law. Had the role been reversed, with the VT'ers swarming across the border to raid the Mass system, you would have a re-enactment of Lexington and Concord.

What's a guy from Jersey know? First wife was from Milford NH and I got to see what was behind the veil of tourism and ski trade. What I saw shocked me and I came from a relatively poor family.
post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 
When I said "may attend UVM" the uncertainty is due to finances. We're very limited in what we can pay in tuition and regardless of grades our daughter will have to go where we can afford. She has the likelihood of sports scholarships for skiing and soccer at some smaller schools but fell in love with UVM. What parent wouldn't ask the residency question?
post #17 of 24
Just getting a driver's license won't establish residency and you have to have established residency for at least 2 years before starting school. You can't switch residency halfway through. Once you start school, you're stuck with whatever state residency they validate at that time.

Fair or not, that's the rules. I happen to agree that, since taxes subsidize the state schools, they have the right to reward those that have invested.

As far as I know, VT does not have any reciprocal agreements with neighboring states. In the late 70's they also had entrance quotas...at least 50% of the freshman class had to be from VT. Fair??? Yes, because the aim of the school is to increase the benefits to the state (assumes that kids from VT are more likely to stay close to home after getting their degree).

I can understand why your daughter fell in love with the school. I still love going back there after 20-some years. The city, atmosphere, vibe is amazing. If you can swing it, it's far better than the UNH schools...both my wife and my sister went to Keene after leaving UVM and they weren't happy with their choice. I had many friends that went to UNH, Plymouth, and Keene and they all wanted to come visit me, not vice versa.
post #18 of 24
I see the point about state subsidized schools, but you gotta admit that students DO bring money in to the state other than tuition. They all need homes, food, etc while they are in school. And most of them will have some kind of income from a job. I'm not bustin your chops, NH.

Quote:
posted by yuki:

First wife was from Milford NH and I got to see what was behind the veil of tourism and ski trade. What I saw shocked me and I came from a relatively poor family.
Care to expand on that?
post #19 of 24
It was not what I expected. Here in NJ, most of our peers were in jobs in government, sales or some profession. She admittedly and unabashedly so, that she came to NJ because that's where the money was.

High unemployement and at best seasonal work .... working down at Hitchners metal products on the acid dipping vats while you had an M.A. in literature ... that sort of thing.

Very "hand to mouth".

The highlight was getting to live in Linda Kesabian's cabin. LK was one of the Manson Family ... pretty primitive because you couldn't drink the water since the cows polluted the shallow well ... outhouse, etc.

Visiting the .. from memory ... "William Faulkner Estate" where her sister was caring for the surviving sister. Impressive from the road, but the place had been stripped to bare bones with hardly a bit of furniture.

It seemed like every time we went visiting, we had to bring food.

Please don't get the idea that I shudder at the thought of primitive living. I spend every other weekend in a cabin with no electric, water and an outhouse.

I think the ski towns are mostly inhabited by city transplants who run businesses that cater to the NY tastes. On every trip and during most transactions I'll ask ..... "where you from" with one exception, the answer was VT or NH. Like my dealings with the Maine Dept of Environmental Protection, of the three peersons that I dealt with on an issue ..... every one was from New Jersey.
post #20 of 24
Thanks, yuki. I haven't formed much of an opinion yet : since I haven't lived here too awful long.

As for living in Linda Kasabian's cabin....she was the one person I would have had compassion for!
post #21 of 24
Thread Starter 
UVM only gets 8-10% of its budget supported by the state of Vermont, it functions largely as a private institution in that respect.
post #22 of 24
University of New Hampshire is underfunded by the state of New Hampshire, as is UVM evidently. Both have large percentages of out of state students. The high out of state tuition is used to offset the expense of educating in-state students. This is not evidence of a well supported institution, in my opinion.
post #23 of 24
Cute story, John Dowling. 'Cept that White River Junction is in Vermont. And it was in 1899, too.

[ October 27, 2003, 08:06 PM: Message edited by: David7 ]
post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally posted by yuki:

What's a guy from Jersey know? First wife was from Milford NH and I got to see what was behind the veil of tourism and ski trade. What I saw shocked me and I came from a relatively poor family.[/QB]
Pretty fair observations I would say, Yuki. Part of the price we pay for living here, I guess.

By the way, are there any Vermonters now living who were not originally from New York, New Jersey, or Iowa?
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