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Poll: Boot Flex - Page 2

Poll Results: Which forward flex do you prefer in your boots?

 
  • 14% (11)
    flexible boots
  • 54% (40)
    somewhat flexible boots
  • 31% (23)
    barely flexible boots
74 Total Votes  
post #31 of 49
Seconds 27 through 35 in that video would be a good example.^^^
post #32 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl R View Post
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94jE6Xtj_vo

Exactly where do you thrust your hips forward?
Some suggest that its easier to pull your feet back under your hips.
post #33 of 49
For your convenience:



Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
Seconds 27 through 35 in that video would be a good example.^^^
post #34 of 49
I currently use a Noridca Hot Rod 130 flex, but have been in Xwave 8.0 and Tecnica TNT 8.0; all fairly stiff boots, but not nearly at the top of the flex charts. The HRs give me a more progressive flex and don't bottom out. I can't imagine trying to absorb terrain and not being able to change the angle in my ankles to counter flexion at the knees and hips. OTOH, I really don't get the point of a poll. I buy what I think I need for MY skiing. Liquidfeet is a lightweight female skier from the East with interests in recreational racing. What possible relevance is my preference in boot flex to her? It seem relative as well. A 130 flex boot is not difficult for me to move, but would be like bending steel to a lightweight skier. For skiers of my weight and ability, it is a mid-range flex. For skiers of less weight, it is extremely stiff. For a competitive racer it would be like a noodle. YMMV
post #35 of 49
Do you really think "bring the hips forward" is a good description for seconds 27 to 35?
I see someone adapting to the terrain while compressing to get the skis through the transition.
She has a neutral "hit in the stomach" position that should be the start position for any skiing. That doesn't equal pelvis thrusts in my book.
post #36 of 49
Flexing a boot to get forward? Does this really work?

Consider the point in the turn where the movement to get forward is made. How much pressure can a skier put on the boot at that point?
post #37 of 49
CarlR, have you met Max501? I think you two will like each other.
post #38 of 49
Max: Some but not that much. Might be useful for strange ski-school formation skiing.

Soft boots are comfortable.
Hard boots helps to keep the balance when it's going faster.

Take your pick.
post #39 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl R View Post
Do you really think "bring the hips forward" is a good description for seconds 27 to 35?
I see someone adapting to the terrain while compressing to get the skis through the transition.
She has a neutral "hit in the stomach" position that should be the start position for any skiing. That doesn't equal pelvis thrusts in my book.
This thread is a Boot Flex Poll, designed to confuse the heck out of the OP...don't try to muddy the water with movement analysis when we're trying to muddy it with personal gear preferences. Start your own thread if you want to confuse Liquidfeet.
post #40 of 49
Lol
post #41 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
This thread is a Boot Flex Poll, designed to confuse the heck out of the OP...don't try to muddy the water with movement analysis when we're trying to muddy it with personal gear preferences. Start your own thread if you want to confuse Liquidfeet.

Can we at least work on some popular myths to promulgate without basis in fact?
post #42 of 49
You rather need the right forward lean, that together with flex that match your weight, hight and speed will make the possibility to shift your weight back and forth.
I agree with Carl R
" Soft boots are comfortable.
Hard boots helps to keep the balance when it's going faster."
The boot should transfer as much energy from my body as possible to my skies.
post #43 of 49
The only way i can see my hips moving forward by flexing my boots is if my heels lifted at the same time, otherwise my stance just gets a little lower, and my hips remain in the same position relative to my feet. and even in soft boots, the amount of movement is tiny in relation to the amount of forward lean built into the boot. maybe i'm doing it wrong.
post #44 of 49
Here's an example of what you could do without changing your angle in you ankle, and the result in skiing will of course be huge:



post #45 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
I really don't get the point of a poll. I buy what I think I need for MY skiing. Liquidfeet is a lightweight female skier from the East with interests in recreational racing. What possible relevance is my preference in boot flex to her?
Yes, Cirquerider, it's all relative. That's why I wrote the poll the way I did. I'm curious as to how people on this forum choose boots, and why. I'm wondering if most people choose boots that to them seem stiff, or soft, or somewhere in the middle, and I'm wondering how they make that choice. Every one of us as we buy boots has the option of making this very choice. Perhaps there are a few other people who also might be interested in seeing what people have to say.
post #46 of 49
That clears it up for me. Relative stiffness for the skier.
post #47 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
That clears it up for me. Relative stiffness for the skier.
Glad we've got that taken care of.
post #48 of 49
I chose #2. My old boots were too soft and I could feel them bottom out on hardpack steeps.
post #49 of 49
I believe she said "move her hips forward" not thrust. I would say that just from casual obsevation that Ms. Paerson ( your link) constantly is fighting to keep her pelvis moving forward into the new turn especially as she enters the energy phase if she lets her pelvis get sucked back at the end of her energy phase and the beginning of the rediection phase she's screwed. Her transition phase then becomes very scary,and neutral phase well then it becomes anything but neutral. I wouldn't confuse a "position of Power" type of turn that world cup racer's make with the more common "posture for profficientcy" that instructors and strong all mountian skiers employ, both are correct according to terrain and circumstance. As for your earlier post I beg to differ stronly! The only skier's that don't need to bend their ankles are statues because they are not moving anyway hence it doesn't effect their balance. Ms. Paerson is most diffenetly flexing her ankles throughout her turn in order to bring her feet back under her mass to accomodate the transition and neutral phase of her turn. I personally prefer a moderate flex 110 that is very stiff laterally. At 5'5, 138lbs it is more than adequit for gates, keeping track of hormonally driven teenagers and themuch coveted free runs! . I think that a good portion of the general skiing public have never been fitted correctly for their boots, and there lies the crux of the problem.
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