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Nordica Mach 3 Power vs. Head Magnum - Opinions Please

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I am looking for a 71-74 mm wide waist all mountain ski that I can also use for slalom training.

I have narrowed it down to the:

Nordica Mach 3 Power - L=154 R=13.5 (too soft at this length?)
Or
Head Supershape Magnum - L=163 R = 12.5 (too soft?)

Any Others?

I am looking for the stiffest, highest performing ski available that fits my criteria of 71-74 waist and R<14. Which ski do you think will perform better for slalom racing?

Obviously neither ski is going to perform at the level of an FIS slalom race ski but I would like something that comes close.

Me: 5'7, 150 lbs, 7 Nastar handicap

Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 12

Buy Some Used Slalom Skis

BUY SOME USED SLALOM SKIS. Find somebody that's selling their race only skis. Used race skis will be cheaper than the the little midfat carvers that your looking at. If your going to train slalom, ski on slalom skis.
If your good enough to ski slalom well you can ski a slalom ski almost anywhere on the Mountain. For light short guys slaloms work well in powder also, and you can ski tree lines that the fat ski guys can't.
post #3 of 12
^^^^^What he said.

Out of the two you have chosen, I'd go with the Magnum, but I would NEVER ski it in a slalom course. If you're planning on skiing slalom and actually skiing it well (being competitive) do yourself a favor and get a real slalom ski. The difference between the 65 waist that you'll get on the the SL ski and the 71 waist you'll get on a ski like the Magnum is almost nothing... and most real slalom skis rip the Magnum a new one.

Later

GREG
post #4 of 12
Bottom line comes down to how much you really care about slalom racing. If you want one ski for skiing wherever that you happen to be able to take into the course once in a while, then get the Magnum (Nordica is way too short for you in that length). However in no way will you be competitive.

Don't get me wrong, the Magnum (and Mach 3 Power) is a fantastic ski, I've got a pair ready and waiting for some snow - if you just happen to like to hop in some gates, then go for it, but if you want any measure of true slalom performance then you've got to go for a real slalom ski, or at least ~65mm slalom carver.
post #5 of 12
The Mach3 power is the best hard snow carver that I have ever skied, but it is not a race ski.

I have never seen a 154 but have skied the 162 and it is not soft. Can't speak to the Head but I'd agree with the others...get a race ski.

SJ
post #6 of 12
i skied a Mach 3 TI the other weekend @ A-Basin. was on a 178cm. It was anything but soft. It was stiff as a mofo and heavy to boot. Not sure where the Power is in relation, but would have to make an educated guess that it's pretty similar.
post #7 of 12
Same ski..........Full name is Mach 3 TI Power.

SJ
post #8 of 12
Mach 3 comes in Power and regular versions.
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 

The reason I want wide slalom skis is this.

The reason I want a 72 mm wide ski is to accommodate a limited range of motion in my knees. I have severe duck feet which prevents me from angulating the inner knee in a turn and results in an A-frame stance. This stance of course severely limits my skiing ability. I will be skiing on the Fischer plug boot that I estimate will provide about 5 degrees abduction for each foot. After buying a 72 cm ski, I plan to mount my bindings in an abducted stance providing an additional four degrees each foot. That amount of additional abduction would not be possible with conventional width slalom skis without booting out.

I race masters and already have Fischer race stock slalom skis in a 155. This is the typical length for most master's racers.
I don't think 1 cm less length in the Mach 3 Power is an issue.

I have seen several good skiers lay down fast race times with non-race skis in both GS and slalom. Both the Magnum and Mach 3 Power are relatively stiff and have appropriate sidecut. They should both go pretty well given a good skier.

I am betting that my skiing improves with the abducted stance more than the slightly wider and softer ski slows me down. Of course this is very experimental and may not work at all in which case I will just go back to conventional race skis.

I am stretching trying to get more range of motion but several physical therapists have told me not to expect much improvement.

Please keep the insights coming.
post #10 of 12
If I were you I would get some 160 or softer flexing 165 slaloms. Double stack lifters to prevent bootout. Do the offset mount into the second lifter, so if it doesn't work you haven't screwed up the skis.
Not worry so much about A-framing, Look at how Lidsey Kildow skis or Phil Mahre skis. Inside knee drive not so much.
The full on Fischer plug boots maybe too stiff. The soft plug boot may be better for a 150 pounder.
Are you doing these modifications to your GS and SG skis also?

Wider softer skis for racing.
I can beat a lot of people on my Dynastar skicross 9 in a slalom course. But they don't work nearly as well as real slaloms and are much slower. I have a pair of Head iRaces (like HEAD XRC sidewall) than are slower in GS than real GS skis but I look faster on them.
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainsport500 View Post
The reason I want a 72 mm wide ski is to accommodate a limited range of motion in my knees. I have severe duck feet which prevents me from angulating the inner knee in a turn and results in an A-frame stance. This stance of course severely limits my skiing ability. I will be skiing on the Fischer plug boot that I estimate will provide about 5 degrees abduction for each foot. After buying a 72 cm ski, I plan to mount my bindings in an abducted stance providing an additional four degrees each foot. That amount of additional abduction would not be possible with conventional width slalom skis without booting out.

I race masters and already have Fischer race stock slalom skis in a 155. This is the typical length for most master's racers.
I don't think 1 cm less length in the Mach 3 Power is an issue.

I have seen several good skiers lay down fast race times with non-race skis in both GS and slalom. Both the Magnum and Mach 3 Power are relatively stiff and have appropriate sidecut. They should both go pretty well given a good skier.

I am betting that my skiing improves with the abducted stance more than the slightly wider and softer ski slows me down. Of course this is very experimental and may not work at all in which case I will just go back to conventional race skis.

I am stretching trying to get more range of motion but several physical therapists have told me not to expect much improvement.

Please keep the insights coming.
Neither ski will work without serious modification to the mount point and lifters. The Nordica (XBS system) is completely out of the question because you can't change the mount (integrated system). With the Magnum you might be able to get away with moving the factory installed plate or mounting a new plate in an abducted stance too allow for your condition. You won't however be able to use the factory installed plate because the holes will be too close to each other. At your size and weight, you need a 165 - don't consider anything shorter. Remember that most sub-165cm race skis these days are intended for women and lighter (younger) male junior racers.

How big are your boots? This is going to effect how much you can offset your mount. Also, if you are going to offset a plate and a binding in order to get the required amount of abduction you will need a ski that can be redrilled/remounted and a plate that is not predrilled.

Personally I would recommend a slalom ski that comes flat and a plate that does not come predrilled. The first option that comes to mind is a 165cm Volkl Racetiger SL with some variant of a VIST plate installed (abducted) and then a binding that you can easily offset BUT will keep the toe and heel in line with each other (like a Tyrolia FF17, Atomic 1018, etc) - basically bindings that have a toe and heel that are attached to each other. VIST plates will be good because you'll be mounting into metal, and you will be able to go right to the edge of the plate without fear of the compromising the integrity of the mount.

Later

GREG
post #12 of 12
What the others said regarding racing on a pair of either of these. Both feel like GS race boards modified for freeskiing, and aren't a slalom solution. Regarding freeskiing, I have skied both a few times, and for my weight (150lbs) prefer the Magnum. It is still a little stiffer than I personally like, and I had better luck on the GSX from Elan. I loved the regular Mach 3 Carbon, but the Mach 3 Power ti was just too stiff for me, and everyone else I talked to for that matter. You have to be a real powerhouse to ski it. The Magnum is similiar but a little friendlier in terms of flex (still a real ski though, not exactly forgiving and easy to ski).
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Nordica Mach 3 Power vs. Head Magnum - Opinions Please