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Lenghts of Lessons - Page 2

post #31 of 41
kINDA LIKE THE MOPED JOKE. FUN TO DO UNTIL YOUR FRIENDS SEE YOU DOING IT.
post #32 of 41
SORRY DIDN'T SEE YOUR REPLY. ARE THE GENERAL PUBLIC MIXED IN WITH THE PASS HOLDERS? fOR GENERAL INQUIRY... WHAT ARE SOME OF THE DIFFERENT WAYS THAT YOUR SKI AREA HANDLES SKILL EVALUATION FOR PLACING STUDENTS???
post #33 of 41
Pass holders are mixed in the general public. Most of the pass holders have specific ideas about what they want to do on a particular day and will let the instructors know. There usually is a supervisor and several instructors who talk to people when the arrive about their skills and what they want to do. Everyone has to take 1 warm up run and check in with the supervisor at a particular chair where people can be switched from group to group if necessary.
post #34 of 41
The ski area I teach at is increasing the time of their group lessons to 2½ hours to give the instructor more time to get to know the students and to evaluate their equipment.

A problem I see in 1 hour lessons is that sometimes time must be spent correcting fundamental problems before we can get to the goal the student wants to work on. Ask them what they want to work on, then see them making huge rotation, or feet locked together, or some other fundamental problem--the skier what wants a mogul lesson but is still stemming.... 1 hour isn't much time to even start to do this, along with introductions, scoping out the suitability of their equipment, lift ride, a test ski to see what they're doing, then getting to work.

The most productive lessons for my own skiing have been six hour multi-day camps.
post #35 of 41
I think it really depends on your resort as to what type and length of lesson is best. At the upper levels, at least at my home mountain, there are very few people who take group lessons. The people who do usually take several per week and you get to know most of them by name. Since most of the time a group lesson is just you or maybe one or two other people, the $50 cost of a private lesson is not worth it especially when you can get unlimited group lessons for a little less than $100 per season. I am almost always the best skier in the group and often ski better than the instructor, but I find that being given the job of demoing a skill usually provides you with more improvement than just being one on one with an instructor with no real pressure on you to do well. I do not know if the same applies at a larger resort though.
post #36 of 41
Last season I discovered my home mountain's season-long program - class size limited to 5, weekly lessons 9-12:30. Incredible value, just the right amount of time per lesson. Drills, yes, but nobody ever forgot we were out there to have fun while improving. Best skiing money I ever spent.
post #37 of 41
five minutes.

Give them one thing to work on, go ski.
Most people won't come out of a longer lesson with much more than one or two things.
post #38 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrangler View Post
Skier31
A 5 hr group lesson!? What a joy. I'm curious about how many people avail themselves of this? What does it cost? Most areas here in the west think that longer group lesson sessions are economical suicide. Trying to convince the "Bean Counters" of the merits of extended group lesson and the benefits (ski area/instructor identification, ski better=ski more, opportunity to convert student from groupie to private etc. etc. etc.) usually falls on very deaf ears.
Our group lessons run from 10-4 or from 1-4
Privates from 9-4 or 1-4 or whatever
Camps vary

We are encouraged to attain certification through pay incentives and the oppurtunity to teach more advanced lessons.

Lessons aren't cheap, but I'd like to think their worth it.
post #39 of 41
At Copper, our lessons are 10-3:30 or 11-3:30. Privates have flexibility, of course.
post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrangler View Post
SORRY DIDN'T SEE YOUR REPLY. ARE THE GENERAL PUBLIC MIXED IN WITH THE PASS HOLDERS? fOR GENERAL INQUIRY... WHAT ARE SOME OF THE DIFFERENT WAYS THAT YOUR SKI AREA HANDLES SKILL EVALUATION FOR PLACING STUDENTS???
For group lessons there is a ski off which places the skiers in groups 3-6 or 7-9. There is the opurtunity to switch groups, but it is not ussually necissary except in groups 1 & 2.
post #41 of 41
My home mountain tried the hour and a half group lesson and quickly went back to two hours. While half hour privates are available, the desk people are trained to suggest a two hour private, but most privates sold are one hour.

As an instructor I find most of the actual "teaching" in a lesson takes five minutes or less, but it can take all day to get the student to a place where they are receptive to new ideas and get enough repetitions to start to learn it.

My preference as a student is all day clinics, but less then one run with someone who knows my skiing and whom I trust is enough. (One time Micky Stone casually made an observation about my skiing as he skied by that was a major break through for me.) Working with the public I've found a good compromise is a one hour lesson in the morning followed up by a second hour in the afternoon. That gives the student a chance to ski, or practice, or take a break and regroup without feeling like the clock is running. At my mountain and at some others you can still get the (cheaper) multi-hour rate even if the hours aren't consecutive, as long as all the hours are on the same day. Its kind of a pain for scheduling and may not be available during busy periods but its worth asking about.
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