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What's a virtual bump? - Page 2

post #31 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post
Reduced......not released......big difference. That is what confuses me about your concept Max....see, when you end a turn the forces REDUCE...ie with the exception of gravity, they reduce to the point that they no longer exist....yet you claim that they are still very present, and are somehow RELEASED...this sudden RELEASING of these untamed forces can throw you up as if you had just hit a bump.

This sounds AMAZING Max......please explain this....if your concept is true, you could be up for a Noble Prize in physics! Dont let this oppoturnity pass! You could be making history here Max.....or perhaps you just dont really know what you are talking about.

But I think it will be fun,and educational for all of us to find out.
OIC, splitting hairs again. Pressure is different than force. Reduce is different than release. Etc...
post #32 of 48
Well in my version turning forces are not throwing skiers up in the air...in yours they are.....that seems to be a pretty big difference to me.
post #33 of 48
Thread Starter 
Come to think of it this is what they do, it just hasn't been put that explicitly before

Nothing new under the sun I guess.
...turning on the backsides, aiming for the shoulders of the bumps. I guess a zipperliner going through the troughs is not going over the peaks of the bumps, but when he goes over the bumps at a lower part, he is turning on the downside, just not very much. It is significantly different than what I used to do (use the bumps like banking at nascar), and it's not just pivotion at the peaks and scraping speed on the downside, it's changing direction on the downside.
post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post
Well in my version turning forces are not throwing skiers up in the air...in yours they are.....that seems to be a pretty big difference to me.
So what causes the bump in your version?
post #35 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501 View Post
So what causes the bump in your version?

Line.


Now, please go to other thread and answer the question there waiting for you.
post #36 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post
Line.
Line causes the virtual bump?
post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501 View Post
Line causes the virtual bump?
Yes, the line you ski will dictate the nature of the virtual bump for a given slope.
post #38 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post
Yes, the line you ski will dictate the nature of the virtual bump for a given slope.
But is the line the cause of the bump (earlier you said the line causes the bump)?
post #39 of 48
Comment deleted to keep thread on track.
post #40 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501 View Post
But is the line the cause of the bump (earlier you said the line causes the bump)?
It can....not trying to be cagy here....but it is possible to ski a line, that creates no bump...ie straight lining it....or a traverse will not cause a bump either....but a line down a slope where you make turns back and forth...yes that will cause a virtual bump...the nature of the line, will dictate the nature of the bump.
post #41 of 48
Thread Starter 
I can't stand it any longer!

Look Max, run down a flight of steps at full speed with a big landing in the middle. When you hit the landing - squash! A bump!

Run down a very wide set of steps. When you get to the middle run along that stair without taking another step down for a while - squash! A virtual bump!
post #42 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
I can't stand it any longer!

Look Max, run down a flight of steps at full speed with a big landing in the middle. When you hit the landing - squash! A bump!

Run down a very wide set of steps. When you get to the middle run along that stair without taking another step down for a while - squash! A virtual bump!



Quick take not everybody 6:46pm..the exact moment Ghost lost it and went nuts....it may be important for the trial!


Good analogy btw....also as you move from squash to running back down the steps, the ground falls away again...like going over the backside of a bump....
post #43 of 48
Keeping things accurate: Ghost went nuts at 9:46 PM. That was the time in Toronto!
post #44 of 48

Let's do the KISS principle on this one...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post
Reduced......not released......big difference. That is what confuses me about your concept Max....see, when you end a turn the forces REDUCE...ie with the exception of gravity, they reduce to the point that they no longer exist....yet you claim that they are still very present, and are somehow RELEASED...this sudden RELEASING of these untamed forces can throw you up as if you had just hit a bump.

This sounds AMAZING Max......please explain this....if your concept is true, you could be up for a Noble Prize in physics! Dont let this oppoturnity pass! You could be making history here Max.....or perhaps you just dont really know what you are talking about.

But I think it will be fun,and educational for all of us to find out.
What do you do when you go over a bump? Assuming you don't want to get launched, that is? You flex going over the bump, then you extend on the downside. Racers, particularly, but skiers of all persuasions, generally do not want to get launched out of a turn. So, imagining a virtual bump, I flex coming out of the turn, cross under with the skis, move the hips forward, and extend onto the new edges...
post #45 of 48
Another way to understand the 'virtual bump' effect is to look at what happens from falline to falline on a uniform pitched slope.

Skiing well carved arcs, we are long-and-strong in the falline where our skis are pointed in the steepest direction down the pitch.

From here, as we arc out of the falline and more across the slope, we go from steepest pitch (falline) to a shallower pitch (traverse).
Doing so we experience the effect of skiing into a compression, or the uphill wall of a bump.........

So here we relax our legs, or actively retract them, to absorb the pressure of the skis pushing back (like a bump) as they arc under us,
and we change our edges........

Then as we arc back into the falline, from that shallow across slope pitch to steepest in the falline,
we experince the effect of skiing over a fall-away, or onto the downhill face of a bump.........

So we extend our legs to maintain ski snow contact and regulate pressure, as we would on the back side of a vitural bump,
arriving again long-and-strong in the next falline (extended between virtual bumps).

Hope this helps....
post #46 of 48

Got here from this other more recent thread, but felt compelled to say Arcmeister's description above is the best I've come across yet!

post #47 of 48

I agree that absorbing a bump, something most people know how to do, sounds like a good conceptual tactic to making retraction transitions. However, while it makes sense conceptually, I'm not so convinced that change in slope from fall line to traverse provides enough compression that needs to be absorbed by such a tactic. I believe it is the low riding upper body that is colliding with the legs that remain at the same height in retraction transitions that provides compression that needs to be addressed. Retraction transitions require getting the legs out of the way to prevent such a compression and can be dealt with using the same technique as used in a pre-jump. Good vertical separation to up-unweight just the lower half or at least keep loose the lower body from the upper is the skill used for this technique and is just a tactic for the occasional pre-jump. 

post #48 of 48
                          
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