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Big Sky

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hey y'all-
Saw the previous thread on Moonlight Basin, but have some specific questions about Big Sky. Never been there before and willl be out there for the month during March and would like to know if there're any gyms in town where I can work out (yeah I know, skiing is the first priority but would still like to have another option)? Any suggestions for good eats/drinks? Is there a decent transportation system around Big Sky? Thanks for any help.
post #2 of 11
The Huntley, Shoshone and Summit hotels up at the Mountain Village have gyms. I think the Mountain Inn does as well.
Down in the Meadow Village is Big Sky Health and Fitness:
http://ozssage.com/Gym.htm

Transportation info is at:
http://www.skylinebus.com/

Some restaurant recommendations:
http://www.cabinbarandgrill.com/
http://www.lalunabigsky.com/
http://www.corralbar.com/
post #3 of 11
There's a really good deli, and also a pizza place in the Meadows down near the bottom of the hill.
post #4 of 11
sorry for the thread hijack, but i had a question about big sky as well.
hopefully some with info can share...

i usually head out west anywhere between mid feb through mid march, in order to capitalize on a solid base and 100% of the terrain being open...i am an expert and plan on skiing everything big sky has to offer...

i was invited to jump in on a trip to big sky from jan 12-19th.

historically, is big sky 100% open in mid january?
i would think the best time of year for a deep base and powder would be feb and march, correct?

i am hesitant to go out there unless i can expect the mt to be 100% open.

thanks for any info you can share.
post #5 of 11
I was there in mid-Jan last year. It was 100% open, but not 100% skiable without taking some chances. If you go then, don't bring your best pair of skis. Even with good coverage, you'll still probably do some damage, and some lines will not be skiable.
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by axebiker View Post
I was there in mid-Jan last year. It was 100% open, but not 100% skiable without taking some chances. If you go then, don't bring your best pair of skis. Even with good coverage, you'll still probably do some damage, and some lines will not be skiable.
Ya hit it right on the head Axe.

Mid. Jan. 100% is usually a mortal lock. You will need to know where NOT to go. A good rule of thumb is, if there aren't tracks, it probably is for a reason. The locals know where NOT to go.
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by bunion View Post
A good rule of thumb is, if there aren't tracks, it probably is for a reason. The locals know where NOT to go.
My buddy found that out the hard way last year - 18" core shot!! : The rocks there are REALLY sharp. With that said, we went the last 2 years in January - 2006 was PHENOM!!! 2007 - not so much. Rock-dodge week.
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by bunion View Post
Ya hit it right on the head Axe.

Mid. Jan. 100% is usually a mortal lock. You will need to know where NOT to go. A good rule of thumb is, if there aren't tracks, it probably is for a reason. The locals know where NOT to go.
Yeah, I tested this and lost on Lone Tree a couple years ago. The rocks on that mountain are the sharpest I've encountered, personally I believe there are rock sharpening elves that keep them honed in the off season for maximum damage potential. Can you confirm this Bunion? :
post #9 of 11
Last time I spent about 4 days at Big Sky, I came home with $85 of work needed. Doesn't seem right that even the green runs have these rocks floating around all over and they charge so much for a ticket! Seems like with those kinds of prices mid-season you should have someone picking up those rocks, ala Deer Valley. I could see off-piste, but in late Feb of a good year on the groomers????

I go all season here without core shots, just a ding now and then, minor stuff. But the little rockettes at Big Sky slice you up.
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post
Yeah, I tested this and lost on Lone Tree a couple years ago. The rocks on that mountain are the sharpest I've encountered, personally I believe there are rock sharpening elves that keep them honed in the off season for maximum damage potential. Can you confirm this Bunion? :

Imagine me speaking in a nerdy pseudo-scientific voice)-

Actually, Lone Mountain is an example of a Lacolith intrusion. Picture a bubble of hot magma advancing to the surface of the earths crust but never breaking through. The bubble forms a bulge that is many thousands of feet higher than the surrounding geology. Over millions of years, wind & weather erode the overlying cover and reach the harder lower material of the intrusion. This material resists erosion so it remains while erosion continues to carry away materials around it. Eventually this leaves Lone Mountain.

The rock is type (andesite or dacite) Andesite is an igneous, volcanic rock, of intermediate composition, with aphanitic to porphyritic texture. The mineral assembly is typically dominated by plagioclase plus pyroxene and/or hornblende. Biotite, quartz, magnetite, sphene are common accessory minerals. Alkali feldspar may be present in minor amounts) that is usually lots of flat plates lying about. It is unusual to near impossible to find what would be considered a boulder or a cobble. Just millions upon millions of these flat plates. The crystal structure of the plates is very hard and brittle, and sharp really really sharp.

And then there are the elves. They are disguised as Picas but really they are rock sharpening elves. Unhappy to have to share their powder with the skiers, they spend all fall with 12" mill bastard files sharpening the rocks in the most popular lines.

Another crew of elves then tips the sharpened plates up on edge and braces them. then all the elves retreat to their lairs and await the screams of the unwary as they rip their bases and slice their P-tex. The elves then return to feed on the lost P-tex.
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post
Seems like with those kinds of prices mid-season you should have someone picking up those rocks, ala Deer Valley. I could see off-piste, but in late Feb of a good year on the groomers????
I've watched patrollers do this all day long at Moonlight, but they just can't keep up. On sunny days the rocks warm up and break through pretty quickly too, so you have that to contend with as well. These rocks remind me a lot of shale.
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