EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Waxing in the parking lot :)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Waxing in the parking lot :)

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Would people pay for a hotwax in the parking lot before they begin their ski day?

[ January 05, 2004, 09:19 PM: Message edited by: MelloBoy ]
post #2 of 27
No, but I might consider it at the end of the day when there is more time available.

Tom / PM
post #3 of 27
I said No, because I know better. I'll bet most people or families that ski a couple of times a years would not think twice about having it done while they wait.

I sometimes greet guest at the drop off area. I help them unload there skis. There are a good number of them that look like they just grabbed the skis out of the basement and put them in the car. The skis could use a tune. The other side of the story is thoes people most likely don't know the difference between tuned and untuned skis.

The kids skis are usually in the worst shape.
post #4 of 27
I said no also.

How long would it take to wax and scrape when doing it outside?

Would the wax even have time to absorb into the base before it cools?
post #5 of 27
Some people would. Some people would buy just about anything. Too bad you couldn't get enough time to help them understand why they should get a real tune!

Remember those walk-through hot waxers?
post #6 of 27
I voted yes, but I think most of those who would, would be much better served by an edge tune.
post #7 of 27
What's wax? :
post #8 of 27
I voted no because I wouldn't pay $10 but I might pay $5 or less for a quickie hot wax.
post #9 of 27
Thread Starter 
Well,
I figured I'd get a power inverter and an iron and a foldable table with clamps on it and load it up into my station wagon [img]smile.gif[/img]

estimate that it would take about 10-15 min/pair of skis since I would crayon on the wax then iron it in (saves tons of time on the scraping and conserves wax too).

Most people, when they get to the mountain, seem to take about 20-30min to get ready so it would be done in time. I suppose doing it after the day is over might work too [img]smile.gif[/img]

i've sold edge and waxes at the parking lot for $30 before. I usually carry my mini-tune kit (edge bevels, base bevels, bastard file etc). Most I've ever done was 4 of them in 2 hrs (between 7am and 9am). It pays for the ticket [img]smile.gif[/img]

melloboy
post #10 of 27
Well, if that's what you're doing, how can it hurt?

Would the area complain?
post #11 of 27
Maybe if it was the Miller Lite girls doing the waxing...
post #12 of 27
...and NOT waxing skis.
post #13 of 27
Your problem is doing a decent enough job to justify $10. Crayoning on the wax is not going to impress anyone. I would recommend getting a Hertel Hot Waxer (or something similar) to apply the initial coat of wax then ironing the wax into the base and using a rotor brush to remove the excess wax and polish it. By doing this you could provide a decent hot wax quickly.

Another option is to provide a quick wax for less. When I was at Silver Mountain they provided a free wax service on the mountain. The waxing was accomplished by using a rotary brush. The attendant would hold some wax to the brush while it spun then run the ski over the brush. It provided a quick wax job that lasted about 1/2 the day in spring conditions. Most people were giving tips of a $1 to $3 tip per pair of skis done. It only took the attendant a minute or two to do a pair.
post #14 of 27
Thread Starter 
i'm not gonna crayon it on and leave it like that

i just want to make some money to pay for lift tickets [img]smile.gif[/img]

melloboy
post #15 of 27
I realize you're not going to just crayon on the wax. The problem is someone who is not up on waxing will see you rub on the wax then iron it and think he got a subpar job compared to the layer of wax they got from a ski shop wax job (most of which are done by rolling the ski over a Hertel HotWaxer and not bothering with ironing the wax in or scraping). In the business world perception is unfortunately more important than quality.
post #16 of 27
If you go to a busy mountain on a busy day (weekend) with a lot of beginners/intermediates, you could easily make enough money to pay for a lift ticket to go another day when it wasn't busy! Just make sure you look like you know what you are doing, and try to impress them. You could even do something fancy that doesn't do anything to the ski but impress the customer. Something like getting a fancy clear water bottle sprayer and having it spray out your "super-fast-skiing-sauce" when it is in fact just water, which will clean the base (a little) and impress. (a lot) Talk to them too, tell them how long you've been skiing and your greatest accomplishments of your skiing career.

Just make sure to do a good job, and make sure it is at LEAST 3$ cheaper than the wax they do in the mountain shop.
post #17 of 27
I voted "Yes" because I know 10-12 miniskiers personally who get edge burn and treat it with Zardoz or F4 rub-on.

And no, I won't hot wax for them unless they provide the best part of a pizza.

[ January 06, 2004, 07:51 PM: Message edited by: comprex ]
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by comprex:
I voted "Yes" because I know 10-12 miniskiers personally who get edge burn and treat it with Zardoz or F4 rub-on.

And no, I won't hot wax for them unless they provide the best part of a pizza.
So beginners, burners, and bladers will want them?

post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by Scalce:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by comprex:
[qb]I voted "Yes" because I know 10-12 miniskiers personally who get edge burn and treat it with Zardoz or F4 rub-on.

qb]
So beginners, burners, and bladers will want them?

</font>[/quote]You have it exactly.

And it has a built in advo campaign: Stop the Burn! A little bit of Arctic or green powder could go a looooong way to easing MelloBoy's lift ticket woes.

Next question: can he get a propane-powered iron so he doesn't have to use a 1000W inverter? Gas-fired generators cost more than lift tickets too.
post #20 of 27
I sure could have used the proposed on-hill waxing service today. On my very last run of the day on a totally unremarkable piece of terrain, my skis abruply stopped and I proceded to launch upwards and go right over the handlebars, something I haven't done in years. The stop was so incredibly abrupt that I assumed that my skis had gone under a snowmaking hose or something similar.

Nope. A few inch thick chunk of rock hard ice had built up on the bases of both skis. It extended from the very tips back to the point where the tips begin to rise off the snow. This unwanted triangular shaped block of ice completely filled in the space between the raised portion of the tip and the snow, and was almost impossible to dislodge. Its lower surface was worn quite smooth, and its front surface was totally blunt. It was pretty much equivalent to skiing on a ski without any tip rise at all!

The fact that every snow gun on the mountain was running full blast, and that I hadn't waxed these skis in about 7 days of skiing almost certainly caused the problem. FWIW, my skis always stayed outside when I was on break, so they never had a chance to warm up. I used to think that keeping them cold was useful in preventing icing, but now I'm not so sure. I *am* sure that if I had been better about waxing, this wouldn't have happened. [img]redface.gif[/img]

Fortunately, I had just dismissed my last class of the day, was skiing alone, and no other instructor was around to tag me for beer .

Tom / PM
post #21 of 27
I prefer the salon
post #22 of 27
PhysicsMan, I'm surprised at you. I thought you were better then that. Didn't wax your skis for 7 days.

It may take a while for you to work your way back upto the level of respect I used to have for you...

Hey, at least you were out skiing, on a week day.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by ryan:
...and NOT waxing skis.
Quote:
Originally posted by disski:
I prefer the salon
I was thinking along the same lines. Waxing in the parking lot would be a little cold, but the resulting spectator event is surely worth ten bucks. The resort would probably want to retain the beer and liquor sales concession, but that's a fair trade-off.

What about gondola lap-dancing? Now there's a license to print money . . . [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by Max Capacity:
PhysicsMan, I'm surprised at you. I thought you were better then that. Didn't wax your skis for 7 days.
...but Father, it was just my teaching skis...

Yeah, I know. Mea Culpa, Mea Maxima Culpa. I'll atone for my sins, whap myself across the knuckles with a P-tex candle, and try to do better next time.



Tom / PM

PS - Hey, Dis - Is a salon anything like a saloon? If it's the latter, I'm with you. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

[ January 08, 2004, 10:02 AM: Message edited by: PhysicsMan ]
post #25 of 27
I'll forgive you my son...
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by PhysicsMan:
PS - Hey, Dis - Is a salon anything like a saloon? If it's the latter, I'm with you. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
hmmmm - ladies lying on backs partially clad ....
Does that sound like a saloon?

[img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by disski:
hmmmm - ladies lying on backs partially clad ....
Does that sound like a saloon? [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
Sorry, I wouldn't know anything about places like that.

I thought you were talking about using a couple of Victorian fainting couches to support the ends of the skis while waxing. At least that's what my wife would suspect *me* of doing.

Tom / PM
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Waxing in the parking lot :)