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Name your favorite "small" mountains/resorts - Page 3

post #61 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by edlam View Post
Sugar Mountain, NC , nice place!!
I owe that place a lotta thanks! If it hadn't been for 1½ hour lift lines that started at mid mountain nearly 30 years ago, I probably would never have moved to Colorado.

Where I work: Eldora Mountain Resort (serially); no high-speeds (but a 10 minute lift line is a crowd), but but 8 chairs and a few surface lifts; a little over 1,100 vert, public transportation from Boulder (a world-class city in which to live), maybe the best trees on the front range.
post #62 of 88
Silverton - one lift, your two legs.

A bunch of others: Whitewater, Mt. Baker, Alpental, Mt. Rose, Bogus, Bridger, Discovery Basin, Montana Snowbowl, ABasin, Loveland
post #63 of 88
Berkshire East in Charlemont, MA.

Never crowded, lots of challenge.
post #64 of 88
I'll put in another for Discovery. If that mountain were anywhere else besides Anaconda, it would be "discovered." But thank goodness it's right there. Bring your Carhartts. You'll be glad.

Surprisingly, no one said Lost Trail. It doesn't get much more old school than that. I only get out there once a season, and always plan to do more. Great snow, nice lines, but crowds? What crowds? Maybe a few HS kids from Dillon skiing in jeans or Carhartts.

Red Lodge is another gem. Cool town. Excellent micro-brewery.

Bridger Bowl should probably still qualify, though once they get those condos built....
post #65 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by skskskier View Post
Hunter Mountain (one express quad, most challenging terrain south of killington supposedly),
Hunter? It's got a rep for being like Grand Central at rush hour! I admit I've never been there, but I never got the impression there was anything "small" about it.
post #66 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
Berkshire East in Charlemont, MA.

Never crowded, lots of challenge.

I like Berkshire East a lot too.

also have fond childhood memories of Bousquet and Magic (VT).
post #67 of 88
2nd Favorite:
Alpensmall and here is why



oh and its pretty:





^^Otherside of that rollover is what is likely an unsurvivable cliff.




just a couple of the reasons.
post #68 of 88
I started a thread last year about mountains where you can leave your stuff under a table in the lodge, my personal definition of small and homey (though some of you apparently didn't agree). Candidates: A-Basin, Whitewater, MRG, Andermatt. PhilT: awesome photos, especially the last one!
post #69 of 88
Whaleback in NH.
http://www.whaleback.com/

Just re-opened.
post #70 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ta&Idaho View Post
I'll second Bogus (although it doesn't really fit the bill, imho) and add Southern Idaho in general as an underappreciated place for old school, off-the-beaten-path (but not necessarily small) mountains. In addition to the previously mentioned Bogus Basin and Anthony Lakes (in Oregon, but within striking distance), you can ski plenty of dry powder from slow lifts at Brundage Mountain (my personal favorite), Pomerelle, and Soldier Mountain.

Not a bad place to live...
Agreed, I lived in that area for quite a few years and loved it. Brundage is great. Pomerelle gets tons of good snow, too bad the terrain is pretty much beginner only, IMHO. I've skied at Soldier mountain with over 3 feet of untracked powder, and nobody was there, LOL.
post #71 of 88
Suicide Six, VT. Steep as hell and the topography looks like the Shire. Keep expecting to see hobbits popping out from behind lift poles...
post #72 of 88
Hidden Valley in northern NJ, NJ may have some asking how or why. It was there that I met a very cute little blond girl skiing with her dad. She went on to win Olympic Gold in moguls. It was only 450 vertical feet but it was enough to get me back into skiing after a 10-year lapse. I would ski there four nights a week and it was where I taught my youngest daughter to ski. Thank God for little hills close to where you live.
post #73 of 88
Sugar Bowl and Mount Rose at Lake Tahoe.
post #74 of 88
Silverton- best mountain period.
post #75 of 88
MRG takes it hands down in the east
post #76 of 88
Haven't been there in a few years, but I've always liked Hoodoo near Bend, OR. It's just a blip compared to Bachelor, but there is some really fine skiing at the top through some burned out glades and some seriously amazing views. Sadly, while skiing there as a kid I couldn't stop and launched it into the parking lot...it was empty.
post #77 of 88
Titus mountain -- Malone NY
friendly, uncrowded like a private club --mtn is well taken care of , price is great and 1250 vert
post #78 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by tchpdx View Post
Mt. Ashland - southern Oregon on the California border in the Siskiyou Mountain Range. Advertising mottos, "Its Steeper Here" and "If you can ski here, you can ski anywhere". 300+ inches a year that usually come in dumps, it is a half hour from my front door and they are trying to expand
I'll second Mt. Ashland. Its the mountain I grew up skiing and have skied most of my life. Too bad its expansion will never happen.....they've been fighting in the courts for over 2 decades & I don't think the mountain has the resources to keep fighting forever. Its a La Nina year so Mt. Ashland should get dumped on this year.
post #79 of 88
Apex, Okanagan Valley, B.C.

Red Mountain, south central B.C.

Castle Mountain, Alberta, Canada, is on my to-visit list.

Is 2600 acres, 3100 vertical, too big for this list? Crystal Mountain, Washington, just put in a new lift opening 1000 acres of ungroomed single & double diamond terrain.
post #80 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by oneotwoandcounting View Post
Hidden Valley in northern NJ, NJ may have some asking how or why. It was there that I met a very cute little blond girl skiing with her dad. She went on to win Olympic Gold in moguls. It was only 450 vertical feet but it was enough to get me back into skiing after a 10-year lapse. I would ski there four nights a week and it was where I taught my youngest daughter to ski. Thank God for little hills close to where you live.
I think it might have helped a little that her family also owned a house at the base of Killington.
(I assume we're talking about Donna W.)
post #81 of 88
My vote would be Willamette Pass, east of Eugene, Oregon... lots of varied terrain especially the trees adjacent to the speed skiing run called RTS. The wooded area is nicknamed SDN Steep, Deep and Narrow, part of it is out of bounds with a few rock bluffs. The main lift rawks, a high speed six pack lift with future plans to expand someday on West Peak which you can hike and ski on a good powder day.

As mentioned, Mission Ridge is awesome when filled with snow.
post #82 of 88
Ski Cooper in Leadville, CO just has to be on any such list. Perfect for the family who doesn't need anything steep and deep. You can feel at ease letting the kiddos go off on their own. Though the trail map shows a variety of green/blue/black runs, I'd more appropriately grade the runs from light blue to medium blue.

I used to take my boys there when they were younger, as the older two could go off on their own while I worked with the youngest who was under 5. They used to let you buy a $5 beginner lift only ticket, which is great if you're just working with your little one for the day.

Playmate coolers and picnic baskets are the norm in the lodge at the base. Unless they've improved, don't let anyone in your party plan to rent skis onsite. We did that once and it took just shy of all day to get a family outfitted.

Well managed place with friendly, helpful ski patrol keeping things well under control.

AM.
post #83 of 88
Puy St. Vincent, France. Kind of like a 4300 vertical foot Buttermilk until you drop off the side into 2500-3000 vert of 40-45 degree perfectly spaced Mellez(larch)trees that no one skis. When La Grave and Serre Chevalier are wind effected and unskiable it is often perfect as it is in a wind shadow. You can ski the trees in a blizzard,too.

Val Frejus,France. Another amazing, unknown ski area.
post #84 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by bennerlur View Post
Homewood, California
Pretty nice mountain, most of the poeple cant ski it. Awesome tree skiing, stays pow all day. Nice park too, and never crowded. Lifts are slower than god, but thats changing.
For out West, I'll second that. Homewood is my third favorite Tahoe resort (behind just Squaw and Mt. Rose.)

For back here, I have to go with my home resort: Elk Mountain, PA. It has some great black cruisers and I think the most crowded I have ever seen it was maybe a 3 min lift line, which was probably on a $15 demo day.
post #85 of 88
I would start with Pebble Creek another little if you can ski here you can ski anywhere mtn. 2000+ vert and incredible OB. I would agree with Discovery thank goodness it's still not discovered. Turner no one mentioned Turner, although it's a pussycat compared to when it had the 1.25 mile T-bar going up 2000'.
post #86 of 88
My favorite small area is Snow King Mountian in Jackson WY. Its the steepest ski hill in N. America, season passes are $99, and it's never crowded except during Hill Climb weekend which has the best mullet watching anywhere. Others include Greek Peak (I was bummed to learn that Ronnies Run is gone), and Monarch. I have a list of other that I haven't been to yet. Skiing should be for the masses. I'm glad that I ski JH all the time, but the true soul of skiing belongs to the small hill with the slow lift, that anyone can afford to go to. Support them when you can or they will be gone.
post #87 of 88
Killington or Pico Mountain in Vermont. A great place to stay nearby, http://www.bestwestern-rutland.com
post #88 of 88

Best small place

Tyrol Basin without a dought. Best place in Wisconsin
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