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Will upgrading skis make a difference?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Last year was my first season with a ski pass. I skied ~10 to 15 times and improved dramatically than before, when I just went up 1-2 times/season. Anyways the skis I used were Dynastar Agyl 06's:

http://www.ski-n-stuff.com/product.p...4&cat=0&page=1

I got these skis as a gift and they are fairly cheap (as seen in the link).

Anyways my question was if it worth it to get new skis? I consider myself intermediate. I can ski down most runs, and can do simple moguls. If I upgrade my skis will I notice a difference in my skiing and will it make doing certain things easier? OR should I stick it out with these skis for another season and improve more before I shell out the big bucks?

Basically is it worth for an intermediate skier to upgrade from beginner skis?

Thanks in advance!
post #2 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by vback View Post
Last year was my first season with a ski pass. I skied ~10 to 15 times and improved dramatically than before, when I just went up 1-2 times/season. Anyways the skis I used were Dynastar Agyl 06's:

http://www.ski-n-stuff.com/product.p...4&cat=0&page=1

I got these skis as a gift and they are fairly cheap (as seen in the link).

Anyways my question was if it worth it to get new skis? I consider myself intermediate. I can ski down most runs, and can do simple moguls. If I upgrade my skis will I notice a difference in my skiing and will it make doing certain things easier? OR should I stick it out with these skis for another season and improve more before I shell out the big bucks?

Basically is it worth for an intermediate skier to upgrade from beginner skis?

Thanks in advance!
Are you finding the ski to be too soft? Is their chatter when carving a turn? As you reach your top speed do the skis feel unstable? If you answer yes to any of these, then you may need stiffer/more advanced skis.

Your current skis probably allow for easier turn initiation, and more forgiveness, so if your abilities are not up to it, going to a "better" ski may actually hinder your development and your wallet growth.
post #3 of 11
Boots that are just right for you are your most important piece of ski gear. If you don't have boots that are very well suited to your up-coming ability as well as fitting like a warm snug glove (not a warm bedroom slipper), then put your money there first.

If you're in the market for skis, the best $20 you can spend is a subscription to Peter Keelty's ski reviews on his Tech Support For Skiers subscription web site. Included in the subscription are personal answers from Peter about which skis should be on your demo list.

Demo? You betcha. The difference between equally excellent skis is amazing. One will be just right for you. Another might be just right for me. I might do poorly on your favorite, and vice versa.

I really like the skis Head is putting out--I think their skis are a couple of years ahead of what the other brands are putting on the retail racks--so consider the iXRC800 and the Xenon Xi 7.0. The Xenon isn't the choice for ice or hard pack, tho. Don't hesitate to get a pair of last year's color XRCs if you find one. These skis like to be skied kind'a short...I'm 6', 200#, good skier, and I like the 170s. You'll like shorter ones if you're smaller, low to moderate energy level, and lower skilled (as you are).
post #4 of 11
Splurge on boots, save on skis!

A good tune goes a long way.

a higher performance boot, properly fit and aligned will reap great and ongoing benefits.
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
Splurge on boots, save on skis!

A good tune goes a long way.

a higher performance boot, properly fit and aligned will reap great and ongoing benefits.
I have to agree
post #6 of 11
Ebay is your friend when it comes to ski deals. You can get a ton of ski for 200ish.
post #7 of 11
New skis might help, they might hurt, or the difference might be lost on you. Preferences vary widely, your best bet is to find a demo day where you can try as many different skis as possible to get a feel for what works for you. I would suggest you not buy a pair blind, just because they cost more, after only having tried one model. There were plenty of expensive skis that I liked less than the cheap, beat up, delaminated, core-shotted, poorly tuned resort rental skis I started out on.
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
Splurge on boots, save on skis!

A good tune goes a long way.

a higher performance boot, properly fit and aligned will reap great and ongoing benefits.

Ditto on the boots...Seriouslly consider Intuition liners.
post #9 of 11
One of the most important questions in commenting on any change in skis is where you ski.

Each part of the country has conditions that make the type and length (as well as your weight) .... factor.
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
Splurge on boots, save on skis!

A good tune goes a long way.

a higher performance boot, properly fit and aligned will reap great and ongoing benefits.
Pearls of wisdom... listen and learn..... You can rent skis, you can't rent a properly fitting boot. A poorly fit boot will hold you back regardless of the ski.
post #11 of 11
Take boot advice to the bank. True story: I was in Anchorage at a conference last year, knew I was gonna take a day off to ski, brought my boots, no skis. Got to Alyeska, confident they would have nice generic fats. Well, yeah, at the other lodge 20 minutes round trip by bus. All they had where I was: fairly random intermediate level 70-something Atomics. OK, wanted to ski, not ride the bus, rented a well-worn pair, had them quick-sharpened, hit the mountain. Big big mountain, everything from crud and ice to a foot of new pow higher up in the bowls. And y'know what? The skis did fine. Not optimal, not my first or even fourth choice, but with my own boots I could drive them, I could force them to hold a carve at decent speeds, and I could control them in the deep crud/chop. If I had rented boots, I would have been confined to the blue groomed.
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Will upgrading skis make a difference?