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Skiing Intesifies at 50. Why? I'll tell ya'! - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Gotta chime in again-- got several folks IN THEIR EIGHTIES at our local mtn who still ski REGULARLY--- read that 3 /4 times a week . these guys and gals are and have been my heros . They are VITAL in every respect and AGE to them is celebrated and just number

Pete has it right --------at this point Life is Not a dress rehersal ----Enjoy
post #32 of 51
61 here, and I bought a dual sport motorcycle this spring. I've been making high speed carved turns all summer. It hasn't done much for my legs, but its sure improved my attitude. See ya when the snow flies!
Cheers,
Bob
post #33 of 51
Talking about these guys in their eighties who are still skiing; A LOT, reminded me of this guy we met last year doing some video shoots. He's the first guy in this video, Ken Miller, and I think he said he was 83 when this was shot. He said he was 6 or 8 weeks off a hip replacement when we shot that day. He skis everyday and was fun to talk to. Anyway, there's hope.

post #34 of 51
As long as ya can still set bad examples for the young, ya will never get old!:
post #35 of 51
I'm 56, and started skiing at 51. As a result, I'm am stronger, fitter, and happier (at least during winter) than I was 10 years ago. Its the old "years to your life and life to your years" thing, eh?
Screw the ol reaper. He'll have to catch me first.
post #36 of 51
I love the thread too. I am 51 ... and 1/2 (lol) for purposes of this thread. I started sking later in life, and immediately, undoubtedly, the first time I put boards on my feet and my friend purposedly took me to the top of the mtn. and I was equally frightened to death and amazed at the beauty of the mtns, and the ability of my friend ... or for that matter, anyone, to be able to ski down the slippery slopes, it was a thing of wonder.
I am passionate about sking. Frankly, as I suspect many here do, I think about sking a lot, every day, and certainly even moreso since September or so. When I work out I think of sking, when I look up to Mt. Baker each day I think of sking, I read about skiing, hell - I wore my ski boots in the house last night like a little boy might - and smiled the entire time. Yes, I am passionate about it. If I could, I'm pretty certain I would ski every day; in some sense, in some way it encompasses who I am ... or maybe who I would like to be. I do love it. FYI: My wife of 25 ... yes and 1/2 years (married on my birthday) does not ski, I wish she did, I think she does too, but besides thinking I'm a nut (true enough) she supports my passion, in part because she knows it is a passion, and I am grateful for that!
post #37 of 51
I'll be 76 this skiing season and maybe because I have skied for 63 seasons, 25 as an instructor where you are out there every day, I now consider skiing as a nice hobby but a lot less compelling than it used to be.

A Caribbean cruise in the middle of the ski season to warm the old bones is very inviting and probably will happen. That does not mean I would like to move to Florida in the winter, just that skiing is getting to the stage with me where it is nothing special anymore, I've done it all my life, I can ski OK and well enough to where, if I can't do it, I can fake it well enough that no one is the wiser.

When I was younger I was very passionate about many things in my life, in the last few years I've mellowed to the point where my endeavors are there for me to enjoy at my pace, no need for me to feel INTENSE about them.

But I fully understand all the posters and my message to all of you is to enjoy getting older, there is nothing you can do about it anyway, sadly my skiing buddies of my age have mostly dropped by the wayside, but for me, NOT JUST YET.

....Ott
post #38 of 51
Quote:
The last time I had skis mounted the shop guy (who was probably in his twenties) said to me "You do know you stay 49 from here on out, right?"
That's almost a direct quote from the shop guy at Mad River Glen when I rented demos there the year I turned 50.

The equipment is still improving at a faster rate than my body is aging. When my 2 best ski days lifetime were at ages 46 and 54, that's probably more a statement about what I wasn't doing in my 20's.
post #39 of 51
When I talked to Pierre, he said you were, like 25 or something....
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ott Gangl View Post
I'll be 76 this skiing season and maybe because I have skied for 63 seasons, 25 as an instructor where you are out there every day, I now consider skiing as a nice hobby but a lot less compelling than it used to be.

A Caribbean cruise in the middle of the ski season to warm the old bones is very inviting and probably will happen. That does not mean I would like to move to Florida in the winter, just that skiing is getting to the stage with me where it is nothing special anymore, I've done it all my life, I can ski OK and well enough to where, if I can't do it, I can fake it well enough that no one is the wiser.

When I was younger I was very passionate about many things in my life, in the last few years I've mellowed to the point where my endeavors are there for me to enjoy at my pace, no need for me to feel INTENSE about them.

But I fully understand all the posters and my message to all of you is to enjoy getting older, there is nothing you can do about it anyway, sadly my skiing buddies of my age have mostly dropped by the wayside, but for me, NOT JUST YET.

....Ott
post #40 of 51
>>>When I talked to Pierre, he said you were, like 25 or something....<<<

Never felt a day older until lately (sigh)...oh, to be seventy again...

....Ott
post #41 of 51
I'll be 53 this season and like most at the half century mark or better reflect back that a lot of seasons have passed. I still jog most every day and do some weight training. Tried the Phil Mahre sprints workout that was in the last ski mag issue (forget which one) down at the football field the other day and it confirmed to me that jogging 5 miles won't prepare you much for running sprints. I was pretty disappointed after running 7-8 50 yard sprints back to back and how winded I became. So, something new to work on and see if I can get a little better at.
For me, the guys I admire at my home hill that are our best bumpers are all older than me for the most part so that's kind of inspiring. Anyway, when you step into your bindings you're 12 years old again Right?

I remember seeing Klaus Obermeyer at Aspen a few years ago skiing fast and making tight turns at 80 something. Later I saw him walking in one of the mountain lodges, it was hard to believe the great contrast between the two activities. Skiing is a great sport that almost makes you ageless. I really can't think of other sports that allow you to participate at a pretty high level for as long as skiing does.
post #42 of 51
>>>it was hard to believe the great contrast between the two activities.<<<<

When you get old, the walk from the parking lot to the lift is the hardest part of the skiing day...

....Ott
post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
I'm 65 this year
Good god, are you sure you didn't do some math wrong? I thought you were my age!

Back on topic, last year I was feeling the best I have ever felt skiing. I'd had a few breakthroughs, etc. Then, just after I'd gotten in more vertical than any prior year, I smashed into some trees (no memory of the accident). Now, my dreams of skiing into my 80's seem a bit questionable as it has not been an easy year recovering. I have the new helmet, new skis, new jacket, etc., and the pass, but really I see this year as a recovery and re-evaluate year because I really don't want to have another accident like the last one. There was about two months where EVERYTHING had to be done for me by my saintly husband and it was not fun. So, I'll be slowing down and more thoughtful about what I am up to, which is NOT where my head was at last season while I was flying high. I HOPE that once I get back out there that I get "it" back, but I've been seeing a lot of areas where I used to triumph erode a bit, maybe due to the head thing, and really it's unnerving me.
post #44 of 51
Thread Starter 

Getting the legs ready to rock and roll

Both skiing and cycling, one change at 50+ is that it is taking longer to warm up. cycling I can actually feel the extra wattage kick in after about 25 minutes of warm up pace. skiing presents a tremendous challenge with respect to warm up on powder days. the problem (glorious problem) is that your very first run, your first 5 turns in fact on deep untracked powder at the top of a chute or enormous face, may be epic, the best of the day. My solution to having to be ready for that first run is this: With about a half hour to go before the lift opens, (on these days that means I've been in line already for about an hour, getting colder and stiffer by the minute) I get out of my skis and leave them in line to keep my spot, thanks guys, and walk over to a steep pitch somewhere near the lift line. I do sprints up that pitch for a warm up, each sprint goes just past the tracks in the snow of the last sprint. I can actually feel that the 8th or 9th sprint goes better than the first couple, so I know I am good to go. hopefully, I can get back in line where I left my skis.
post #45 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post
Good god, are you sure you didn't do some math wrong? I thought you were my age!

Back on topic, last year I was feeling the best I have ever felt skiing. I'd had a few breakthroughs, etc. Then, just after I'd gotten in more vertical than any prior year, I smashed into some trees (no memory of the accident). Now, my dreams of skiing into my 80's seem a bit questionable as it has not been an easy year recovering. I have the new helmet, new skis, new jacket, etc., and the pass, but really I see this year as a recovery and re-evaluate year because I really don't want to have another accident like the last one. There was about two months where EVERYTHING had to be done for me by my saintly husband and it was not fun. So, I'll be slowing down and more thoughtful about what I am up to, which is NOT where my head was at last season while I was flying high. I HOPE that once I get back out there that I get "it" back, but I've been seeing a lot of areas where I used to triumph erode a bit, maybe due to the head thing, and really it's unnerving me.
I am post-60, a skier, and a practicing physician. My general experience is that, as people age, those who do best are those who accept their physical limitations and stay within them. The push-the-envelope macho types would do well to read the above post again. The best way to be happily skiing into your 80s is to pace yourself. I prefer to look upon life as a marathon rather than a sprint. There are a lot of sprinters out there who are either: a) dead or b) too orthopedically challenged to ever ski again.
post #46 of 51
Thread Starter 

making adjustments, keeping what you need

Quote:
Originally Posted by ebough View Post
I am post-60, a skier, and a practicing physician. My general experience is that, as people age, those who do best are those who accept their physical limitations and stay within them. ....
[Sibhusky, write me if you like, I have some gear ideas that pertain to lighter experts, (being short and light).]

I'd like to address the above quote and speak also to sibhusky: I'm 60 in a couple months. Still ski over 50 Palisades runs annually, but I have made some adjustments: shorter, wider skis for our snow and mountain. Saves the knees, easier to pivot, wheelie, and slide the tails. I do a major warm up each morning (ski daily). I quit skiing dangerous exposure when I get tired. And eliminate bump skiing as much as possible (many ex-bump-champions I know have paid heavily for that type of knee skiing). With these few adjustments, I hope to keep shreading without injury. Being 60, and skiing without ortho-impedimento (sift snow), I am inclined to think these adjustments have worked.

You are totally right to look at the whole picture, skiing as a lifetime sport

I enjoy skiing as much now as when I was 25. Had I been into big hucks and mega bumps in mt 30's, my ski days would have long since been over. Any form of ltoday to understand that they will want to ski when they are 60, and that big huck today could just destroy that future. Oh, and most important, no joint injury ever heals completely, that is a total myth!!!!!! Every joint injury reappears later in life (my personal observation).
post #47 of 51
I just turned 50 and 10 years ago my wife and I quit our safe, secure jobs and moved from the midwest to Colorado. Because I can now ski a world class resort any time I like, my skiing has dramatically improved along with my desire. I don't yet see the end in sight but I am aware that it is "out there" and I have no plans to slow down any time soon.
post #48 of 51
Well, I did go skiing yesterday, first time this year. Took it easy. Had new helmet, new goggles, new mittens, new jacket, new pants, new neckgaiter, new longjohns, new sox, skis that I hadn't used for three years, and NEW WRISTS. So, it was hard to feel normal. Nevertheless, did 10 runs, then called it quits for the day.

I've always been viewed as a bit eccentric, because I ski with a bell on my pole and have always valued function over fashion so I have the gaper thing going occasionally. But now I am probably going to be avoided even more because I am talking to myself on the hill..."Get the weight forward, use your edges, stop picking up the inside leg, just roll from edge to edge, watch not to get too close to the side of the trail because there are trees there and they hurt...."

Anyway, survived the first day, didn't fall, handled slightly iffy conditions (to me anyway) and am hoping tomorrow and Thursday I will continue getting the head back in line.
post #49 of 51
42 years of skiing. I've been passionate about it since the first day. I spent as much time as possible doing it through high school and college, into adulthood...Then career and family bumped it aside a bit. Focus on the kids, getting them started, etc. and putting my needs last. Life went on, grabbing runs when and where I could.

Then wham...early non-voluntary, out to pasture retirement. A couple of years spinning my wheels, then a chance to chase a dream. So right now, I spend almost all my free time at a large Vermont resort, trying to keep up with skiers who put in 100 days a year. I suck, frankly, compared to them...they are younger, stronger, and fearless. Some of them are older, stronger, and fearless. But I am doing it, and no way will I stop. Every day I hurt like hell. My knee is junk and needs surgery. I gasp and pant, but I am doing it. And I wont f******g quit. I feel younger than I have in the last decade. Ibuprofen for breakfast and dinner, and to hell with it. My former co-workers will never know what I know now. They will never see sunrise on a mountain, or a sunset. They thought I was done, but I am chasing my passion, regardless of what anyone says, and few people get to do that. I know men who work for major corporations who would trade places with me in a heartbeat.

Many of us on this board will understand what I mean. There is something about what we do that drags us out of bed, puts us on a hill in bitter cold at an early hour, and keeps us there year after year. The view from the summit, the rush of motion, and the indescribable feeling that comes after a great day on the mountain tell me that I will never, ever stop until they slam the lid on me and dump me in a hole. I get to follow my passion, live my dream. and those who thought I was as good as dead can go to hell. I possess something they will never have. My body makes cracking and popping sounds like a bowl of rice krispies, and it is all worth it. I'm an old guy...according to my kids...but like the t-shirt says, "Old Guys Rule".
post #50 of 51

Almost the far side of the Mountain

mz
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post
Good god, are you sure you didn't do some math wrong? I thought you were my age!

Back on topic, last year I was feeling the best I have ever felt skiing. I'd had a few breakthroughs, etc. Then, just after I'd gotten in more vertical than any prior year, I smashed into some trees (no memory of the accident). Now, my dreams of skiing into my 80's seem a bit questionable as it has not been an easy year recovering. I have the new helmet, new skis, new jacket, etc., and the pass, but really I see this year as a recovery and re-evaluate year because I really don't want to have another accident like the last one. There was about two months where EVERYTHING had to be done for me by my saintly husband and it was not fun. So, I'll be slowing down and more thoughtful about what I am up to, which is NOT where my head was at last season while I was flying high. I HOPE that once I get back out there that I get "it" back, but I've been seeing a lot of areas where I used to triumph erode a bit, maybe due to the head thing, and really it's unnerving me.
Sibhusky, thanks for the compliment, it feels nice to be compared to a hot chick of 39 years!

Be a little patient on your crash and injury been there 1986 21 days in hospital, you will recovery fully AND will be ab le to ski again with 100% confidence etc. it will just take a little while. Don't dwell on it mentally on the hill or off and the wreck will slide back into oblivion it will just take a little while. Sorry you can't make it to snowbowl on 21st. Pete
post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by CapeSkier View Post
42 years of skiing. I've been passionate about it since the first day. I spent as much time as possible doing it through high school and college, into adulthood...Then career and family bumped it aside a bit. Focus on the kids, getting them started, etc. and putting my needs last. Life went on, grabbing runs when and where I could.

Then wham...early non-voluntary, out to pasture retirement. A couple of years spinning my wheels, then a chance to chase a dream. So right now, I spend almost all my free time at a large Vermont resort, trying to keep up with skiers who put in 100 days a year. I suck, frankly, compared to them...they are younger, stronger, and fearless. Some of them are older, stronger, and fearless. But I am doing it, and no way will I stop. Every day I hurt like hell. My knee is junk and needs surgery. I gasp and pant, but I am doing it. And I wont f******g quit. I feel younger than I have in the last decade. Ibuprofen for breakfast and dinner, and to hell with it. My former co-workers will never know what I know now. They will never see sunrise on a mountain, or a sunset. They thought I was done, but I am chasing my passion, regardless of what anyone says, and few people get to do that. I know men who work for major corporations who would trade places with me in a heartbeat.

Many of us on this board will understand what I mean. There is something about what we do that drags us out of bed, puts us on a hill in bitter cold at an early hour, and keeps us there year after year. The view from the summit, the rush of motion, and the indescribable feeling that comes after a great day on the mountain tell me that I will never, ever stop until they slam the lid on me and dump me in a hole. I get to follow my passion, live my dream. and those who thought I was as good as dead can go to hell. I possess something they will never have. My body makes cracking and popping sounds like a bowl of rice krispies, and it is all worth it. I'm an old guy...according to my kids...but like the t-shirt says, "Old Guys Rule".
Wow, good stuff. Could win as most intense post in the thread. I'm with you in spirit, I'm with you in aches and pains, I'm just not with you on the hill!
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