or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Listening to Music While Skiing
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Listening to Music While Skiing

post #1 of 57
Thread Starter 
There seems to be a pretty big controversy about whether listening to music through either an audio equipped helmet or ear buds is #1: ethical #2 safe.

How many people here listen to music while they ski, while they are on the chair or not at all?

Is it rude, or more importantly unsafe?

There is no denying that bumpin some Breaking Benjamin will get you pumped as hell to stomp some gnarly line, but is it worth it or necessary?
post #2 of 57
I always have headphones on, not just skiing. It's rude as hell in normal life, less so while skiing. Probably not too safe at work, but ski hills are much safer places than where I work. Skiing is a time for me to relax. I mute it if I realize someone is talking to me.
post #3 of 57

my $.02 - not necessary, sometimes dangerous

Listening to tunes on a lift? If I listen, then I listen on the lifts. So long as you're not bugging anyone else, it's fine IMO. That said, it's cool sometimes to talk with the other riders, so I keep it low enough to be able to hear them. The old-timers talk about how social the sport used to be.

During a run with others on it? Not necessary and possibly dangerous unless you can hear others and hear what your skis/board are/is doing on the snow.

In a pipe with nobody in it? Not necessary, but probably fine if you don't care about hearing the snow. You'd better be sure nobody's around though.

Passing others? I now assume people ride with music on and can't hear me pass, so I give them as wide of a berth as possible. Don't be like them.
post #4 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino View Post
Passing others? I now assume people ride with music on and can't hear me pass, so I give them as wide of a berth as possible. Don't be like them.
As long as you know the downhill skier has the right of way and yelling "on your right" doesn't change that fact, we'll get along just fine.
post #5 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
As long as you know the downhill skier has the right of way and yelling "on your right" doesn't change that fact, we'll get along just fine.
Absolutely; it's the uphill skier's duty and one should assume the person can't hear & give a wide berth. Side-effects may occur when folks don't follow that rule...
post #6 of 57
Is there some unwritten rule that says this topic has to be brought up anew every other week.

Just in case anybody missed it on all the other threads:

IMO - people who ski while listening to thier ipod are gapers. You can't hear people asking to pass on traverses, you can't hear some gaper above you screaming "Whoa!!! Look out duuuuude!!!!", you can't hear anything besides the crappy music you're blasting. Besides, people who have to be plugged-in 24/7 are just wierd. As far as the backcountry is concerned, I'd much rather ski with a heroin junky than someone listening to thier ipod.
post #7 of 57
Personally, I love to listen to the thwak sounds of a dead horse being beaten while skiing.
post #8 of 57
Let's make this gddmn thread a sticky, then it'll never go away...
post #9 of 57
Thread Starter 
Sorry about the thread repost....
post #10 of 57
I thought bennelur was (is) a ~130lb. yout...chill
post #11 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
You can't hear people asking to pass on traverses
Dude, you're way too hung up on this stuff. Chill. Have a cold one. Ski a place that isn't made of traverses!
post #12 of 57
My short take is: If you want to do it, enjoy it but be careful, be prudent, be extra aware and don't forget to turn off the tunes once in a while and enjoy the sound of the great outdoors.

BTW, Giro G10 Audio Helmets are on SAC right now for $60
post #13 of 57
The only downside of a helmet is that it dampens the sound of what is beneath your feet.
post #14 of 57
Hmmm, maybe I'm in the minority here but even when I didn't wear a helmet or tune in. I didn't think the aural cues as to the condition of the snow were as important or as strong as feeling it in the bottoms of your feet, in your ankles and in your knees.

If there's been two or three inches overnight and I go from skiing where it's relatively soft underneath to a shadowy area where it's really crunchy underneath of course I can hear the difference but the sound pales in comparison to the fact that I can FEEL the difference. To me the feel is way more instant, substantial and informative.
post #15 of 57
I hate riding with friends that are plugged in.

I always listen to music when I'm alone. I also have a mute button on my wire that is glove freindly. Music gets shut off at the lift line, even if I'm alone.

but alone, in the trees, on a storm day... I love having tunes. And when it gets irritating (as it does) I turn it off.

This is a pretty easy topic, guys.
post #16 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
Is there some unwritten rule that says this topic has to be brought up anew every other week.

Just in case anybody missed it on all the other threads:

IMO - people who ski while listening to thier ipod are gapers. You can't hear people asking to pass on traverses, you can't hear some gaper above you screaming "Whoa!!! Look out duuuuude!!!!", you can't hear anything besides the crappy music you're blasting. Besides, people who have to be plugged-in 24/7 are just wierd. As far as the backcountry is concerned, I'd much rather ski with a heroin junky than someone listening to thier ipod.
You are an idiot and a gaper. Pass people on traverses, don't let them pass you.

Have fun skiing with my friend who has become a junkie - he will be puking and falling asleep while you are wondering how the hell you are going to get him out of the backcountry.

Focus: I never used to, but with the advent of earbuds, I can keep the music to a level where I can hear it, but also can hear people talk and skiing around me. When in the trees with a group I turn it off for locating purposes.
post #17 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpfreaq View Post
I didn't think the aural cues as to the condition of the snow were as important or as strong as feeling it in the bottoms of your feet, in your ankles and in your knees....To me the feel is way more instant, substantial and informative.
Feel probably is more important, but why not have sight, touch, and sound available if you're skiing hard? (If you're just cruising with nobody around, then I'd admit tuning out does no harm.)

The show Sports Science just showed a test demonstrating that aural cue reaction time was far faster than visual cue reaction time (using Jerry Rice as the test subject). Could be interesting to know whether feel or audio cue gives you a faster reaction time.
post #18 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
IMO - people who ski while listening to thier ipod are gapers. You can't hear people asking to pass on traverses, you can't hear some gaper above you screaming "Whoa!!! Look out duuuuude!!!!", you can't hear anything besides the crappy music you're blasting. Besides, people who have to be plugged-in 24/7 are just wierd. As far as the backcountry is concerned, I'd much rather ski with a heroin junky than someone listening to thier ipod.
I ski with music and can still hear people just fine. I turn it off if I'm on the lift with somebody that wants to talk.
post #19 of 57
IMHO, skiing with music is safer than skiing after drinking all the beer that people here talk about.
post #20 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino View Post
Feel probably is more important, but why not have sight, touch, and sound available if you're skiing hard? (If you're just cruising with nobody around, then I'd admit tuning out does no harm.)
Well, because it's fun. That's what it's all about, right?

I don't think of it as tuning out at all. It's just another element brought into my focus. Usually it enhances my focus, when it gets in the way the mute button is a tap away on my chest. For the most part having tunes on helps my skiing. When it hinders, tap. I rarely have them really loud but they still have to hamper my awareness of what's behind me so when it's crowded, off they go.

Sure prudence must be observed in regards to the situation at hand. Sure having it on at all makes things a little bit riskier.

I guess I'm in it for the fun and willing to accept the risk...sometimes....when the risk isn't too high.

Quote:
The show Sports Science just showed a test demonstrating that aural cue reaction time was far faster than visual cue reaction time (using Jerry Rice as the test subject). Could be interesting to know whether feel or audio cue gives you a faster reaction time.
It would be interesting. I guess it's subjective and personal but I feel like by the time I hear soft conditions turn hard my feet have already started reacting.

I've been using an ipod for the last three out of nineteen years skiing so most of my experience is without.
post #21 of 57
I think the combination of tunes and weed is the way to go, and found the skullcandy tuneups system you get on giro helmets work pretty well. No hits or mishaps. Am considering a similar system when windsurfing.
post #22 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by ripnbud View Post
I think the combination of tunes and weed is the way to go, and found the skullcandy tuneups system you get on giro helmets work pretty well. No hits or mishaps. Am considering a similar system when windsurfing.
Of course I would never ski with music unless I was high. Without the heightened awareness it could be dangerous.
post #23 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by redkal View Post
You are an idiot and a gaper. Pass people on traverses, don't let them pass you.

Have fun skiing with my friend who has become a junkie - he will be puking and falling asleep while you are wondering how the hell you are going to get him out of the backcountry.
Hey Einstien - you might want to turn your sarcastometer on. Try going back and reading my post without smoking crack first. Epic should really have some kind of minimum IQ to qualify for membership.
post #24 of 57
I've heard great skiteachers working for the ski school of Hermann Maier say that you ski better while listening to music because you stop concentrating on your skiing and just .. ski
post #25 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
Hey Einstien - you might want to turn your sarcastometer on. Try going back and reading my post without smoking crack first.
The dude took you literally with respect to skiing with a heroin junkie. I was LMFAO at that.
post #26 of 57
Only on those terrible t bars, sometimes on the lifts, never when Im skiing though.
post #27 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by bennerlur View Post
There seems to be a pretty big controversy about whether listening to music through either an audio equipped helmet or ear buds is #1: ethical #2 safe.

How many people here listen to music while they ski, while they are on the chair or not at all?

Is it rude, or more importantly unsafe?

There is no denying that bumpin some Breaking Benjamin will get you pumped as hell to stomp some gnarly line, but is it worth it or necessary?
Wow, this is an original idea for a thread that has never been done before multiple times, and so wouldn't have been found with a search. :

Edit: Damn, she beat me to it. (and in a more helpful manner too, it must be the estrogen )

Quote:
Originally Posted by bklyn
Personally, I love to listen to the thwak sounds of a dead horse being beaten while skiing.
post #28 of 57
At least it's not a cell phone...

When I'm skiing in MN (read: laps, laps, laps, and more laps...), I wear phones, but at a very low volume so that I can have a normal conversation while on the chairs. Most days I'm by myself anyway.

When I'm out west, no earphones. My game needs to be better out there. There aren't too many "no fall zones" here in MN...
post #29 of 57
Quote:
The old-timers talk about how social the sport used to be.
Or how social the WORLD used to be?

These days, everybody has something in their ears. If it's not iPod, it's their cell phone!

But I honestly didn't realize so many feel so strongly about the topic. Jeez...

I don't like to shout "passing..." at the downhill skier in the hope they would hear me. Not even before this age of iPods. It's kind of rude. I try to pass with some distance but if they make a sharp turn or start suddenly, I might end up brushing them. Still no big deal.

For me, if skiing gets to be so boring I need my iPod, I'll find another hobby.
post #30 of 57
I love music.
I love skiing.
I do not love skiing with music.

"Each mountain, each run, has it's own rythms. The goal of the skier is not to impose one's own rythm upon the mountain, but to seek out the rythm of the mountain. To ski and be as one with the mountain."

...From the zen of skiing by Crank.


Seriously though the reason I don't listen to tunes on the hill isn't a safety issue, it's the rythm of the mountain.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Listening to Music While Skiing