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Boots or Skis (long)

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Background: I’m a 56 years old, 5’7”, 155 lbs., solid level 7, moderately athletic skier. I ski the east and spend 95% groomed but I’ll venture into the bumps when they’re nice and soft. I plan to work on skills to spend more time in the bumps and trees. When I was 19 severely mangled my right ankle, left me with reduced motion in the ankle and a right leg some 3/8” shorter than the left and a right foot a size and a half smaller than the left

Last year I ripped the liner in my 5-6 year old Atomic CR10 boots. It was time for new boots. Went to a very well respected local boot fitter and ended up with a pair of Dalbello Proton 8’s. They proved to fit my rather blocky feet, and wide mid foot quite well. And the softer flex seemed to work pretty well. After skiing then for several weeks I complained to an acquaintance, who just happens to be a PSIA examiner, that I was having some trouble getting my stance re-adjusted to the new boots. He suggested I meet him on the mountain and we’d ski together. He tried a bunch of different shims and thought that the boots were properly canted but he removed a spacer that had been placed behind my left calf to bring my knees into alignment. It was easy for both of us to see that removing the spacer made an immediate improvement in my skiing. My stance relaxed a bit and I was able to get more on top of the ski. The problem is without the spacer my knees are quite a bit out of alignment – the solution was to add 10mm (3/8”) of lift to my right foot to get my knees back into alignment. Unfortunately, the Dalbello’s have a hollow toe lug, and adding lift to the boot was not possible. The alternatives are to find a flat ski and add a 3/8” lifter plate to the right ski, or just ski the Dalbello's as they are, with my knees out of alignment.

Here’s where I’m looking for advice – While I like the Dalbello’s should I give’em up, take the hit (not sure what if anything the shop will give me if I go for new boots, and they don’t carry some of the alternative boots- Technica- I was considering) – and purchase a pair of boots with a solid toe lug that could be properly modified or find an appropriate flat. The advantage of new boots of course is that I could then purchase any ski – there doesn’t appear to be too many flat skis that are appropriate for eastern skiing- – although I believe Atomic offers the nomads flat. In addition with the new boots, if I’m traveling I wouldn’t necessarily need to bring my skis along – I could rent and demo. And while I could ski with the Dalbello's as they are - I'm really jonesing to see how much improvment (or not) the proper alignment will provide.

Thanks
post #2 of 17
If it were me I would get the lifter plate. If the plate doesn't work out you can always take it off. If it does you didn't just throw out all that boot tuning.
post #3 of 17
You've presented numerous reasons for switching boots and no real reasons for NOT switching. I think you've answered your own question.
post #4 of 17
Long skis, short boots.

(tldr)
post #5 of 17
Unless you are really obsessive about switching your skis out to get even edge wear, I agree with Ghost.

I might have missed it, but what ski are you currently on?
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skydog View Post
The advantage of new boots of course is that I could then purchase any ski – there doesn’t appear to be too many flat skis that are appropriate for eastern skiing- – although I believe Atomic offers the nomads flat. In addition with the new boots, if I’m traveling I wouldn’t necessarily need to bring my skis along – I could rent and demo. And while I could ski with the Dalbello's as they are - I'm really jonesing to see how much improvment (or not) the proper alignment will provide.

Thanks
That is the correct answer.
post #7 of 17
Took the time to read the thread now. You like these boots in all ways except for the lack of the lifter on one? Find a shop that will do the lift on that boot. It isn't impossible. New boots would be a cop out.
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skydog View Post
Background: I’m a 56 years old, 5’7”, 155 lbs., solid level 7, moderately athletic skier. I ski the east and spend 95% groomed but I’ll venture into the bumps when they’re nice and soft. I plan to work on skills to spend more time in the bumps and trees. When I was 19 severely mangled my right ankle, left me with reduced motion in the ankle and a right leg some 3/8” shorter than the left and a right foot a size and a half smaller than the left

Last year I ripped the liner in my 5-6 year old Atomic CR10 boots. It was time for new boots. Went to a very well respected local boot fitter and ended up with a pair of Dalbello Proton 8’s. They proved to fit my rather blocky feet, and wide mid foot quite well. And the softer flex seemed to work pretty well. After skiing then for several weeks I complained to an acquaintance, who just happens to be a PSIA examiner, that I was having some trouble getting my stance re-adjusted to the new boots. He suggested I meet him on the mountain and we’d ski together. He tried a bunch of different shims and thought that the boots were properly canted but he removed a spacer that had been placed behind my left calf to bring my knees into alignment. It was easy for both of us to see that removing the spacer made an immediate improvement in my skiing. My stance relaxed a bit and I was able to get more on top of the ski. The problem is without the spacer my knees are quite a bit out of alignment – the solution was to add 10mm (3/8”) of lift to my right foot to get my knees back into alignment. Unfortunately, the Dalbello’s have a hollow toe lug, and adding lift to the boot was not possible. The alternatives are to find a flat ski and add a 3/8” lifter plate to the right ski, or just ski the Dalbello's as they are, with my knees out of alignment.

Here’s where I’m looking for advice – While I like the Dalbello’s should I give’em up, take the hit (not sure what if anything the shop will give me if I go for new boots, and they don’t carry some of the alternative boots- Technica- I was considering) – and purchase a pair of boots with a solid toe lug that could be properly modified or find an appropriate flat. The advantage of new boots of course is that I could then purchase any ski – there doesn’t appear to be too many flat skis that are appropriate for eastern skiing- – although I believe Atomic offers the nomads flat. In addition with the new boots, if I’m traveling I wouldn’t necessarily need to bring my skis along – I could rent and demo. And while I could ski with the Dalbello's as they are - I'm really jonesing to see how much improvement (or not) the proper alignment will provide.

Thanks
Before you go much further, why don't you post your question in the Ask the Boot Guys section of this forum just to be sure?

Guys like Bud Heishman (who has done the sole canting at several Epic Ski Academies) and others who are canting authorities maybe able to help out so that if you do need to buy another pair of boots they will be actually help your skiing. Although solid toe lugs can make boot sole planing easier, they can often still be planned in boots with removable lugs. It depends on how much planning is required and the position of the lug scews. There may be other approaches I'll leave that to the experts to discuss.
Good luck.
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
Had Nick at GMOL take a look at the boots - he didn't think it was possible to add that much lift.
Currently skiing on 3 year old M-10's - was planning on new skis this year -the M-10's really worked for me - got me using the entire ski not just the back half.
Not really concerned with edge wear but other than powder skis, not many flat skis available. I don't think the skis with integrated bindings can accept 10mm of lift. So if I stay with the Dlabellos I'm very limited in what skis wiil work for me.
post #10 of 17
Atomic Nomad series
Dynastar Legend series
Salomon X-Wing series
Rossi B series

All these companies offer two or more higher end models flat. That gives you several good options.

SJ
post #11 of 17
Head SW skis
Stockli-everything
Volkl- all freeride
K2- Team skis

...sorry, but big deal.


Sure they will all accept a shim,and with all of them he'll have a dedicated left and right ski and won't be able to demo or rent. This seems to be an issue for him. New boots will allow him to switch skis if he cases a rock mid day, or if he wants to rent a powder ski if he travels and catches a storm, or wants to try a buddy's ski. I don't see any reservation about switching boots...so why talk him out of it? he'll be happier with new boots.

If you posted here saying he can lift his current boot...NEVER POST ABOUT BOOTS AGAIN. A DIN sole toe lug is 19mm, it's rockered about 5mm, that gives you 14mm of material to work with...OP needs 10mm of lift. That leaves 4mm of material...and it's HOLLOW. Bad idea. Really, really bad idea.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
If you posted here saying he can lift his current boot...NEVER POST ABOUT BOOTS AGAIN. A DIN sole toe lug is 19mm, it's rockered about 5mm, that gives you 14mm of material to work with...OP needs 10mm of lift. That leaves 4mm of material...and it's HOLLOW. Bad idea. Really, really bad idea.
Indeed, the original lug is hollow. Injection molded plastic. This isn't exactly forged Inconel. It is a very easy and forgiving material to work with. Just because you don't have the comfort level to do it doesn't mean squat.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
Just because you don't have the comfort level to do it doesn't mean squat.
It means I know enough not to get sued...or get a customer hurt due to blatent negligence.

Could the OP send his boots to you for this?
post #14 of 17
No. I'm involved in skiing for the fun aspects these days, not the work.

The liability argument is pointless. You either can do it safely or you can't. If you can't, don't. If you can, you aren't taking any more risk than you are when you do any work to boot soles...canting, lifting, whatever. If you think being competent is enough to prevent you from being sued, I wish you the best of luck with that.
post #15 of 17
owww. eeeesshh...urghh. my head hurts.

I'm betting O.P. has left the building, and as much as I'd like to toss internet darts with you, I'm not gonna. I'm going to go.
post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 
Decided on new boots - got fitted at GMOL - the Impact 8 was a good fit but was limited in the amount of lift that could be added (no more than 5mm) - they suggested I find a pair of last years X Wave 8's - similar last but able to accept 8 mm of lift - found a pair on line for $240 tax and shipping included - had GMOL do the work the other day - been in the boots for two days - and am very pleased I decided to go this way -it will take some time to get used but from the very first balance definitely improved - more flexible and athletic stance - still need some time for liners to packed down and I haven't really settled into the boots sweet spot - find myself in the back seat once in a while (not unuusal for me early in the season) - but I quite sure with a bit of time my skiing will improve significantly.
post #17 of 17
SD, glad to hear you got it sorted.
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