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What's the MOST You Would Ever Be Willing To Spend On a One Day Lift Ticket?

post #1 of 50
Thread Starter 
Well? At what level would the price be such a gouge that you said to hell with it, I'm only going on skins from now on?
post #2 of 50
It was 40 bones industry researcher.

But it's worth so much more than $40 now.

It's worth being with my friends and my dogs alone on a ridgeline.

It's worth being able to go whenever I want, including hiking in the dark and timing it just right for dropping in just after sunrise, or just before sunset, or during a full moon.

It means breaking trail with snow falling all around and learning about snow, stability, weather, and self reliance.

It means no more lift lines.

It means no more crowded parking lots with music blaring.

It means a great workout.

It means a singular experience.

It means the apre' ski beer tastes better.

It means seeing only my tracks on the hill.

It means knowing what real bottomless pow is.

It means skiing in the spring and smelling the foliage come alive.

It means car camping on the east side of the sierra in the spring.

It means laughing at people that think too much about form, and not enough about adventure.

It means mountains. Not restaurants with lifts close by.

It means purity, not commerce.
post #3 of 50
This depends on the road trip to get there and the snow conditions
post #4 of 50
I'm willing to spend one more dollar than the next guy....... if they limit tickets and put'em up for biddding.
post #5 of 50
God help us if Vail resorts or Killington are reading this thread...

My rule of thumb - never pay full retail price for a single day lift pass.
post #6 of 50
This is a great thread.

Only those with unlimited means would say that there is no price too high for a day of skiing.

Few love skiing more than me, but I do have my limits.

Id say $85. $70 is really too much, but for a top notch resort like Vail or Steamboat im ok with it, i guess. Id say if it ever got above $85 a ticket I would stop skiing.

As it is the small resort next to my house charges $65 a day, which for a WI ski resort is a bit rediculous.

Honestly id like to see resorts lower the prices; maybe just $5 a ticket, you know make an effort to show people its not a sport for just the rich.
post #7 of 50
This is a trap:, all the major ski resort administrators are watching this thread very intently. So that being said I won't pay more than 50 bucks, or does
post #8 of 50
Couple of years ago I flew into Jackson for two really big days. Probably cost around $1000/day. It wasn't too much!
post #9 of 50
Should lift ticket prices be reflective of snow conditions?
post #10 of 50
If I recollect correctly a full day pass was $2 when I first started skiing. I'll go for that.

Actually, it depends on what's being offered. Some days I wouldn't pay $2 and other days I'd pay a lot more.
post #11 of 50
I'm also on the never pay list for a single-day ticket band-wagon.

Either some kind of deal is in play or I'm doing a ski-and-stay package where the combined price represents a big discount over paying list for skiing and lodging separately.
post #12 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
Should lift ticket prices be reflective of snow conditions?
no, not in my opinion---but there should be a universal 'test period' like refundable in XXX hours after first use. With all the scanners in use today, it should be relatively easy to implement.

Maybe not fully 100% refundable, but less say a 5% 'restocking' fee or something like that.

If that were the case, my personal highest ticket price would go up.
post #13 of 50
Thread Starter 
I remember when Mammoth charged $9 a day (ok, I'm older than I look) and then it jumped to $11. We incredulously laughed and jokingly said, "next thing you know it'll be $12, then $15, then $18...nah it'll NEVER cost THAT much." If only there were some way to make it so that your estate waived all rights to sue the ski area so that all the liability costs could be removed...
post #14 of 50
I didn't mind paying ~$120 at Silverton...much. There was this:



For the best runs of my life, I'd pay whatever was asked - it's only money. Moments like the above are priceless.
post #15 of 50
$50
post #16 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post
Couple of years ago I flew into Jackson for two really big days. Probably cost around $1000/day. It wasn't too much!
A fella could have a pretty good time in AK/BC for that kind of $.
post #17 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
A fella could have a pretty good time in AK/BC for that kind of $.

Without even putting skis on.
post #18 of 50
It depends on the product. Last year I paid $85 to ski at Beaver Creek, which is outrageous, but I was with friends, the snow was good, and we all had a good time, so it was worth it. I've been a season pass holder with the now defunct ASC for the last six or seven years, so I haven't had to buy many lift tickets lately. And when I did I could always find discounted tickets somewhere. I skied all over Summit County last season and rarely paid more than half price for a lift ticket. However, there are some things I won't do. I won't pay eighty bucks to ski at Killington. I won't pay eighty plus bucks to ski at Stowe. Not when I can ski at Sugarbush for $59. So I guess in my case it comes down to what I perceive to be a good value.
post #19 of 50
I don't often buy tickets, so when I go somewhere else I'll pony up, but the ticket price has a lot to do with where I go.

$1000 a day? For that much you could rent out the entire hotel at Snowbowl, and have enough left over for ten tickets.

I think the most I've paid was around $50, but I might pry some extra out of my wallet to ski Jackson Hole or Snowbird.
post #20 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by doogiedoc View Post
Well? At what level would the price be such a gouge that you said to hell with it, I'm only going on skins from now on?
I'm already skinning. So there it goes...

But I also go to resorts, especially with good company.

On the other hand, I rarely pay full price. They're really a "bench mark" where the discounts are compared. Right now, I'm ok with the 50-60 range of "street price" for a single day ticket. For multi-day, it's easy to get into that range even in the "biggies".

The good news is, there're resorts that don't cost an arm and a leg. You just have to get there. At some point, the saving is enough to justify going the long way there...

As long as the snow is good, I bet most of the people who say they won't pay more than $xx will pay whatever the ticket price to ski. It's when the snow is poor, that the price feels more of a rip-off.
post #21 of 50
I took a trip last year with a few friends to Breck. Another guy and I decided that we would ski a half day the day we arrived. There was some serious snow coming down, so we changed in the parking lot. We were all excited. That was until we got to the ticket window. The lady told us that it was $65 for a half day. That is 4 hours of skiing. So we did what just about everyone else would have done for powder...we payed it! Never again. The skiing was great, but that is absolutely ridiculous.
post #22 of 50
The cost of my season pass divided by the number of days I ski usually turns out to be about $10/day. That's still more than it *should* cost, but oh well, life isn't fair.
post #23 of 50
The question isn't how savvy you are in buying tickets, it's what would you pay.

I played the White Course at Doral yesterday. $135. That's for 4 hours. A lift ticket is for 6-7 hours, and the most expensive one is $85. The ski area has a lot more overhead and a lot less season to recoup it, so I think we're getting a pretty good deal at any place west of the Mississippi for under $85.
post #24 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post
The question isn't how savvy you are in buying tickets, it's what would you pay.

I played the White Course at Doral yesterday. $135. That's for 4 hours. A lift ticket is for 6-7 hours, and the most expensive one is $85. The ski area has a lot more overhead and a lot less season to recoup it, so I think we're getting a pretty good deal at any place west of the Mississippi for under $85.


I disagree with that. I think 60-70 is pushing it for most resorts. Any more than that is price gouging. After all they do have a monopoly on the market. The resorts do have overhead, but many of them also have millions of visitors a year. Are major ski resorts struggling financially? Not to my knowledge. There are many more variables that go into the equation than just lift tickets. How about dining, lodging, and BEER?
post #25 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by ut_hucker View Post
There are many more variables that go into the equation than just lift tickets. How about dining, lodging, and BEER?
Beer? What does Beer have to do with skiing? I'm amazed how often the subject here turns to Beer, when it should be about skiing.
post #26 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by UtahPowderPig View Post
Beer? What does Beer have to do with skiing? I'm amazed how often the subject here turns to Beer, when it should be about skiing.
Mmmmm beer......




Ski areas sell beer UPP. Some sell huge quantities of it, which goes to offset overhead, and that goes to the subject of high ticket prices and whether they are justified based on operating costs, which is relatively close to the premise of the thread.
post #27 of 50
the most I ever paid was 10 bucks a tram ride at Hakkoda in northern Japan. 5000 vert., 45 minute laps. (if you break mid-run only for regrouping.)

Spent 70 bucks a day (7 runs) for three days skiing non stop in fresh snow, never crossing tracks. I would have spent more if it would have stayed open. That was a sick weekend. I think 8 runs a day may have been possible, but we were charging. 9 would be sacrificing quality for quantity.
post #28 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post
I didn't mind paying ~$120 at Silverton...much. There was this:



For the best runs of my life, I'd pay whatever was asked - it's only money. Moments like the above are priceless.
Yeah, I don't mind ponying up for Silverton. Not only is the product exemplary but you get the idea that they're really trying to do great things and really have the rider in mind. It also seems like they're barely making enough to open up the next year.

With the mega-resorts charging $$$ for a lift ticket then charging extra for a decent parking space then absolutely skewering you if you purchase your lunch there, you get the idea that they're just trying to squeeze every last dime they can out of you.

I'll ski these places but only on a season pass or some kind of killer deal. Last time I paid full price for a day ticket was at Howelson Hill in Steamboat. I paid $15 and had fun making turns for a few hours under a bluebird sky. If it had been a powder day I guess I would have left town early and gone to Winter Park where I had a pass.

The only other places I've bought a full price ticket in the last few years were Monarch and Wolf Creek.

Funny thing about my last day at WC... I walked up to the ticket window with correct change for a day ticket. Listening to peeps in the line I gathered that they were having a locals appreciation day and selling tix for $26 iirc... you know... to locals. The dude at the window looked me up and down paying extra attention to my helmet plastered with stickers from lots of the CO ski areas I'd been to in the previous couple of years and said facetiously, "Well you're obviously a local, that'll be $26." We both chuckled at that one.
post #29 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by ut_hucker View Post
After all they do have a monopoly on the market. The resorts do have overhead, but many of them also have millions of visitors a year. Are major ski resorts struggling financially? Not to my knowledge.
Monopoly on the market? What? How many areas are there in the US. Monopoly? And VERY few resorts get millions of skier visits per year.

Major ski resorts not suffering financially? - apparently you missed the whole ASC situation this year. Some of that was self induced, but skiing has never been a get-rich-quick scheme for any operaor except for maybe Aspen, Vail and some of the other notables.
post #30 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post
Monopoly on the market? What? How many areas are there in the US. Monopoly?
Facts. Don't let Facts get in the way of posting.

Ski Areas may not have a 'monopoly' in the traditional sense...but they do test snowmaking guns on innocent bunny rabbits. Spray water right into their little bunny eyes. It's sickening.

I'm pretty sure the ski resort cartel is also responsible for internet viruses.
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