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Binding setting??

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Im about 5'9 125 pounds level 8-9 skier.. ski park and pipe a bit but more backcountry drops and kickers.. drops up to 30-40 ft? im not good with non-metric measures being european.. whenever i go in to a shop to ask they generally ignore whatever i say and set my bindings to 6 or 6.5.. how high can i go but ensure they still come off in a big crash? i have a history of early release problems..
post #2 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twig View Post
... how high can i go but ensure they still come off in a big crash? .
If the crash is big enough you can be set sky high and still come out. It's the slow twisting falls that hurt you. If you set your DIN really high remember to never fall slow.

I usually advise people to go in .5 increments, start turning the DIN up slowly each time you feel you released when you shouldn't have. Also pay attention to how you are releasing. Do you release from the toe or the heel? Check if the heel is up or down after a fall, if the heel is still down after a fall you released from the toe, if it's up it was a heel release. Your adjustments don't need to all be the same. I ski with a higher heel setting than my toe setting.
post #3 of 12
Hmmm. Crank them high enough that you start hearing bones crack during a huge crash, then back it off a quarter turn.
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
I think i sometimes land a bit back seat but not so far that i would fall if the skis didn't come off.. I think in general it might be my toes that twist out..
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twig View Post
I think i sometimes land a bit back seat but not so far that i would fall if the skis didn't come off.. I think in general it might be my toes that twist out..
Learn to ski.
:
post #6 of 12
Love the username. Fill in the blank: "Snap like a _____________ ".

Seriously you've got a tradeoffs to consider. From personal experience I'd rather have them release at speed, than not release in a slow or twisting fall.
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
Funnily enough i can actually ski its only when im hucking of big stuff that i have a problem.. snide coments are just a waste of time.. and fair play to TS01 that made me laugh although i am currently slightly wasted
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01 View Post
...I'd rather have them release at speed, than not release in a slow or twisting fall.
...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vermont Ski Safety
All research efforts to date show that the magnitude of the load a skier applies to a modern binding toe piece decreases with speed (even during competition) and yet all problems of retention (inadvertent release) are blamed on the binding setting.
Speed isn't the problem.

Landing dangerously wrong and twisting out of toes is.
post #9 of 12
Twig - No offense intended, it was hard to resist.

Garrett - You're right, I was talking about my personal experience, not Twig's question. My one experience with a twisting fall at low speed, with insufficient force to release the toe, was bad -- torn ACL. On the other hand I've crashed at higher speeds with enough force to release the bindings -- and had crashes which I think were caused by one or two "pre releases" at speed -- no injury, except to what's left of my dignity. So I'm happy to leave the DIN at type II settings.

In Twig's case, as you noted the issue is landing wrong and twisting out of the toes is the problem (see post no. 4). What would Twig risk by turning up his DIN so high it won't release in a back seat landing with twisting force on the toes?
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
...never fall slow.
Where the heck is Highwaystar??
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twig View Post
Im a level 8-9 skier.
if you are the level of skier you mention above, you would already know the answer to your question.
post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lloyd braun View Post
if you are the level of skier you mention above, you would already know the answer to your question.
Well clearly i don't otherwise i wouldn't have asked.. im a strong skier, skied for 15 years (since i was 4).. im not a ski buff.. the skill level to ski tough lines and huck off cliffs does not automatically endow me with limitless ski knowledge.. i ride my bindings on 7 on piste and 8.5 on off piste/in the park.. they come of at annoying times occasionally.. can i go higher without hugely increasing the risk to my limbs? why would my skiing ability mean that i knew the answer to this?
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