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Groomer crashes: Top three reasons - Page 2

post #31 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
Not mentioned yet...Fatigue.
++
Regardless of skill level this probably accounts for a plurality if not majority of falls.
post #32 of 61
1. Poor judgement.
Examples:
Skiing on Marker Bindings that for no good reason decide to set your ski(s) free from your boots.
Skiing too fast for conditions and fail to see or fail to see in enough detail a bump in flat light.
Overestimated edge grip on ice leading to low-side fall.
Underestimated effect of crud pile leading to high side.
Failure to allow for the strong probability of snow snakes in light cover just off the trial.

2. Failure to adapt old ingrained habits to new ski.
Example Automatically suddenly and heavily weight the tips at turn initiation in order to make a sudden turn on soft shaped ski after skiing SGs for a few hours without thinking.

3. Not paying attention. Eg. distracted looking back up the trail at son skiing down icy run while your ski hits a frozen ridge or other obstacle.
Not being observant enough to avoid kamikazi skiers trying to nail you.


Mechanisms: Skis sliding out(edge releasing unexpectedly), ski edge digging in unexpectedly, ski hitting solid object, binding pre-releasing due to bumpy ride (binding releasing when it should is not a cause).
post #33 of 61
My addition is:

- Not going to the rest room on time when its available.

Seriously my #1 reason for my biggest crash was not going to the rest roo when I had the chance.

I was having stomach troubles all day and after lunch went to get on the lift. The line was pretty long and as I got up to the front near the load area I realised I had to use the rest room. I was near the front and figured I would get down on time so I kept going. Halfway up the lift I felt like I was about to explode, but sitting down the feeling went away. When I got off the lift and started skiing the urge became so strong and I didnt want to literally mess my ski pants so I startled hauling butt to the base. I was going to pull off and hike into the woods or something but there were so many people around it was not an option.

I was really moving, not paying attention, and just as I was almost to the base I was so distracted thinking about making it to the rest room that I hit a crud pile and totally lost control of both my skis and bowels . I had bruises all up and down my left side at the end of the day and i was quite embarasing when ski patrol showed up and realised what had happened.

Moral of the story: Use the rest room when available !
post #34 of 61
PaulR,

Thanks for sharing your story...
post #35 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulR View Post
Moral of the story: Use the rest room when available !
Was that a one piece?
post #36 of 61
During the last ESA at Big Sky I saw three great crashes. All were at the bottom of Elk Park Ridge where the run becomes steep again. I attributed the crashes to three reasons:

3 - Change in terrain. The run goes from moderately steep to steep.

2 - Fatigue. The run has over 1000 vertical feet of drop. The snow was solid but easy to set an edge in so you could generate a lot of G force back into your legs. Add in trying to keep up with Little Bear & Eric and most of the attendees were pushing their physical limits by the end of the run.

1 - Bad technique. All three crashes were caused by the skier being back on his skis dragging their hands resulting in all their weight on the inside ski which would skid out from under them.
post #37 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
Wasn't that called a B5, and wasn't it sooper popular around here a couple years ago?
Great minds think alike, you beat me to it.
post #38 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
1 unfocused mental state
2 anonymous skier in the way
3 Phil gets in the way
I missed the topic

I just catch an edge going way to fast.

Sitting back, then catching an edge = land on head.

steep to flat at high speed, sit back and crash.

These, I'd say, are the common crashes for me.
post #39 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
Was that a one piece?

Unfortunately, yes

I used to have a dark blue one-piece ski suit back in the early 90's.
post #40 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulR View Post
...I hit a crud pile and totally lost control of both my skis and bowels .
That ranks in the TMI category [too much information].
post #41 of 61
Quote:
I used to have a dark blue one-piece ski suit back in the early 90's.
Back in the 90's I had one of those North Face Bib pants - didn't think that anyone would need to use the zip open-able butt flap in bounds, but I guess your story proves me wrong!

Talk about sitting backseat!

Puts new meaning to the phrase, "it's dumping on the mountain!"

Or, "you're skiing like s&%t!"

Sorry - couldn't help myself...
post #42 of 61
My vote for the #1 reason for crashes on groomers is not paying attention to the task at hand, and just skiing on "cruise control". In hindsight it's the reason I fell and tore my ACL last spring on the very run my LIII exam group had skiied about 10 times or so the previous day!

For the second and third reasons I would say:

#2 - Failure to adapt to changes in the terrain.
#3 - Poor technique.

Mike
post #43 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by user View Post
Back in the 90's I had one of those North Face Bib pants - didn't think that anyone would need to use the zip open-able butt flap in bounds, but I guess your story proves me wrong!

Talk about sitting backseat!

Puts new meaning to the phrase, "it's dumping on the mountain!"

Or, "you're skiing like s&%t!"

Sorry - couldn't help myself...
Thats OK, I thought the story would be funny..sorry if I grossed people out. I can laugh at it now though. That isnt a good feeling when you are on the top of the mountain and nature calls and you have nowhere to go !
post #44 of 61
Dude I thought it was funny and I think you've got balls for posting it. That would suck.
post #45 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulR View Post
Thats OK, I thought the story would be funny..sorry if I grossed people out. I can laugh at it now though. That isnt a good feeling when you are on the top of the mountain and nature calls and you have nowhere to go !
Did you go in after the fall
post #46 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trotski View Post
My biggest reason (I think?) is catching the inside edge of my outside ski at the end of one turn when I'm shifting weight for the next turn. I sometimes dawdle with that outside leg and weight shift and disaster ensues-- maybe something like the problem ragin' describes above.

Sounds like you are not releasing the old turn before starting the next turn. Finish the turn by getting back to a flat ski before starting the next turn. Simultaneous and syncronized movements take patience and discipline. Don't rush to the new turn so much you have plenty of time to get there.
post #47 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
Did you go in after the fall
Yeah, but lets say I went right back to the hotel after I ditched the ski suit in the garbage and my wife brought me my jeans from the car. She was laughing all the way home and kept rolling down the window for some reason !

LIke they say, s&^% happens sometimes ! That's life.
post #48 of 61
1) going too fast for the conditions
2) too many people on the slope, especially if there's a wide range of skier abilities (from very slow intermediates to rippers using the groomers to get to "better" runs)
3) skiers (usually lower level) making sudden unexpected moves on the slope
post #49 of 61
3.) Looking uphill while talking to someone behind you
2.) Standing downhill talking to someone uphill
1.) Checking out the opposite sex.
post #50 of 61
Inattention (listening/enjoying music on a run too crowded to do that).....unable to hear snowboarder (who was moving too fast to stop)....not using peripheral vision due to distraction (not sure it would have worked in this case).
post #51 of 61
Personally,

1. innattention I become quickley bored on groomers and my mind wanders and I do some thing stupid and end up on the ground.

2. Pre-release.

2. Skis don't come around, I tip and angulate and the skis arent there. I experienced this several times with my pow pluses till I realized that skis w/ 60m sidecuts dont respond to tipping very well
post #52 of 61

Top three reasons why someone falls on groomed

1. Banking and not enough speed
2. Too much speed and rebounding off snow
3. Booting out
Thats what happens to me.
post #53 of 61
Using too many animated hand gestures in conversation while standing on flat ground. Or was that inattention to my surroundings ?
post #54 of 61
I thought the title was about grooming machine crashes:
1) Dropped that funny cigarette butt into the pants crotch
2) Popping open another beer
3) Holding the funny cigarette in one hand, the beer in the other, and trying to scratch.
post #55 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trotski View Post
My biggest reason (I think?) is catching the inside edge of my outside ski at the end of one turn when I'm shifting weight for the next turn. I sometimes dawdle with that outside leg and weight shift and disaster ensues-- maybe something like the problem ragin' describes above.
This often happens because there is no weight on the new outside ski. The reason for that is usually a combination of 1- not balancing forward enough 2-sinking at the end of the old turn to absorb building pressure (related to 1) and 3-unwillingness to give up the security of teh old edge, which could still be working for you. It is almost impossible to give up the old outside ski quickly if you settle or lean back. The good news is this is a very common mistake for relatively good skiers. The bad news is that even when you know you are doing this it is hard to self coach. I started a thread about self coaching to avoid settling at the end of turns.
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=61019
post #56 of 61
Its 2pm your extremely tired and you want to go home with something to remember. Hey we haven't skied Wheelchair yet. Of course by now what little snow Wheelchair had in the early morning is now nonexistent.

Seriously everyone should stop skiing by 1:59pm. Most accidents occur at 2:00pm.
post #57 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post
I thought the title was about grooming machine crashes:
1) Dropped that funny cigarette butt into the pants crotch
2) Popping open another beer
3) Holding the funny cigarette in one hand, the beer in the other, and trying to scratch.

You beat me to the punch...
I might suggest number 4 being eating popcorn:to satisfy the hunger from number 1 and the perfect compliment to number 2 ...

Washington people think alike...:
post #58 of 61
1) Collisions with other skiers
2) Ice patches/dull edges(in the midwest)
3) Snowboarders
post #59 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post
Its 2pm your extremely tired and you want to go home with something to remember. Hey we haven't skied Wheelchair yet. Of course by now what little snow Wheelchair had in the early morning is now nonexistent.

Seriously everyone should stop skiing by 1:59pm. Most accidents occur at 2:00pm.
I don't know, I was skiing at 4 PM, but had only done 26,090 feet at that point, whereas on 3/15, a mere two weeks earlier, I'd fit in 51,901. I think that everyone points to time of day as an indication of tiredness and therefore accidents, whereas you've got tons of people not arriving until 11 or 12 or so and then there are those who've been out at 8:30. So, unless you are asking what time they started in addition to what time they fell, you're not learning much. The 2 PM number is more likely to be tied to "maximum number of skiers on the hill skiing". At least, back when I was a weekend skier back east, I'd clear off the hill by then due to CROWDS, not exhaustion.
post #60 of 61

#1. Too much speed...

#2. Too little ability.

#3. Brain not engaged.

#4. All of the above...
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