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How to install NEOX 4.12 bindings?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I am trying to install some NEOX 4.12's (05/06) on a pair of Metron 11 B5's (06/07).

How do I do it?

Is this possible to do on your own? I have never installed bindings, but do have experience waxing/edging skis. I understand you do not need to drill into the skis for these bindings.

A regular screw driver wants to strip the screws, what kind of screw driver do I need?

I could always have a shop do it for like $25, but where's the fun in that???
post #2 of 16
your life...your bindings..only hurts for a second then it a bright lite and sweet music...may wake up to the sound of sirens or chopper

again your choice
post #3 of 16
PS
Most shops up here now charging 100 to mount bindings on equipment not purchased at shops
post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by skidbump View Post
PS
Most shops up here now charging 100 to mount bindings on equipment not purchased at shops
Most places I've been to charge around $30 for mounting on a ski with a plate on it already. If you're getting charged $100 for a simple mounting, I'd say you're getting ripped off, or you're paying for drilling and mounting of plate as well as binding.

That said, $25 or $100, I'd still let the shop take care of that. Its a small price to pay for the injuries it could save you from. I've never mounted myself, but I'd imagine there are a lot of things that could go wrong, both in the instillation and adjusting of the bindings, that someone who has never done it before could run into.
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by skidbump View Post
PS
Most shops up here now charging 100 to mount bindings on equipment not purchased at shops
Find a shop that doesn't suck/think you are a sucker.

Proper method of installing NEOX bindings:
  • Open box.
  • Parts fall out.
  • Look around for a few minutes and hope you found all of them.
  • Screw stupid platform from the Department of Redudancy Department to the ski.
  • Slide toe and heel onto ski.
  • Hammer with rubber mallet for good luck.
  • Line up the indicators for the tracks to your boot sole length.
  • Place silly little plastic cap over tracks at middle of binding.
  • Realize you put it on backwards, switch it around.
  • Screw down silly plastic cap.
  • Realize the tracks moved, unscrew and repeat the last several steps.
  • Set forward pressure.
  • Set release setting.
  • Function check and then test with a currently calibrated Vermont Calibrater (sic) or electronic binding tester.
Advanced Technique:
  • Visit eBay.com
  • Sell skis and bindings
  • Buy something less annoying
If you don''t know you need a Pozi for this, you probably don't have a Calibrater kicking around either. I vote for either the Advanced technique or the find-a-ski-shop technique.
post #6 of 16
Its not a sucker thing or sucks thing.Its someone showing up with a pair of skiis and bindindings they DID NOT buy at shop and thinking that the price on board is for them.There are confused.They dont understand why a shop would charge some much.Cant comprehend the profit thingy mcbob issues a shop need to make.So a couple local shops my almost double install and test charges.why????Because makin no money on the labor, all money is made on skiis and bindings.
post #7 of 16
I'm not saying it didn't happen, I'm saying 100 bucks is excessive even if they are charging you a "walk-in" fee. Unless it is a complicated install.
post #8 of 16
Having STUPIDLY tried to mount my own bindings about 25 years ago(and having the drill go through the bases), if I "HAD" to do it again, I'd use a drill press. It's for more than setting the hole depth that the jig has the stops on each screw location.
post #9 of 16
I'm pretty sure the local shop (Rochester NY) charges upwards of $50 to mount bindings purchased elsewhere. They wouldn't even adjust (for free) my Neox to my BSL when I bought used skis there (for $450)!


I'm sure this has come up before, but how many shops actually verify the release setting with a Vermont Calibrator?
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post
I'm sure this has come up before, but how many shops actually verify the release setting with a Vermont Calibrator?
In the US, all of them that don't want to get sued. It is required. Are there unscrupulous shops that don't? Sure. Should you shop at those? No. If you can't figure out what a pozi-driver is, should you take this on yourself? Probably not.

Shops have been dropping serious coin on Skitronics. Record keeping is important. Dotting Is and crossing Ts. I've worked with several techs that have been sued, none found it a particularly enjoyable experience. Drags on for years. For a job you get paid squat to do.
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thank you all for your input. I found a local shop that will install them for $39. Can't argue with that. I have no problem with a shop that charges extra for gear you didn't buy there - in fact, it would probably be in a local shop's best interest to never install bindings to ski's not purchased there - goodbye online retailers! Ever try to bring a box of brake pads to your local mechanic? Unless you have a relationship, they'll probably pass on your business.

What can I say? I got a great deal on my gear on the internet... I have NO DESIRE to pay double for 2008 vs. 2007 skis, and most B&M stores dont't have any 2007 stuff left. Its a cut throat capitolistic country, take advantage or get taken advantage of (I hate to say it...)
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrtyWkndr View Post
Thank you all for your input. I found a local shop that will install them for $39. Can't argue with that. I have no problem with a shop that charges extra for gear you didn't buy there - in fact, it would probably be in a local shop's best interest to never install bindings to ski's not purchased there - goodbye online retailers! Ever try to bring a box of brake pads to your local mechanic? Unless you have a relationship, they'll probably pass on your business.
Nice, glad to hear you found a decent rate. The problem with not taking internet customers at all (it would be interesting if a couple buying groups got together and made that rule, but in reality they don't have the leverage to do so) is that mounting a ski usually gives you two visits from a customer, and chances are pretty good you'll sell them something. Plus it gives you an opportunity to clue them in on when they should come back looking for a deal.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
In the US, all of them that don't want to get sued. It is required. Are there unscrupulous shops that don't? Sure. Should you shop at those? No. If you can't figure out what a pozi-driver is, should you take this on yourself? Probably not.

Shops have been dropping serious coin on Skitronics. Record keeping is important. Dotting Is and crossing Ts. I've worked with several techs that have been sued, none found it a particularly enjoyable experience. Drags on for years. For a job you get paid squat to do.
I know what a pozi driver is, among other things. That's one reason among many that I question if my bindings, which are typically adjusted in the backroom away from a customer, are actually being checked.

Is there any kind of certification or training that a tech needs to go through in order to verify a DIN setting? I mean an actual course, not just reading some company supplied literature. What do you think a shop would do if I asked to see their certification?
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post
I know what a pozi driver is, among other things. That's one reason among many that I question if my bindings, which are typically adjusted in the backroom away from a customer, are actually being checked.
I know you do. I was referring to post number one.
Quote:
Is there any kind of certification or training that a tech needs to go through in order to verify a DIN setting? I mean an actual course, not just reading some company supplied literature. What do you think a shop would do if I asked to see their certification?
The certifications range from mere legal ass-covering to reasonably thorough coverage of the basics and testing for at least short term retention of the appropriate practices. You pass a certification for each manufacturer, and you do this each year. Read the Salomon shop practices manual sometime, available from salomoncertification.com. It is a fairly well written and comprehensive document.

I've never had a customer ask for proof of certification, not sure how shops would take that. They might incorrectly assume you are a litigious sort and stonewall. The point of the certifications is indemnification, without indemnification most shops would not be able to afford to do service work. In practice what happens is customers ask you to work on a binding you don't sell, and then they get pissed when you politely refuse even when you phrase it as "we are not trained and qualified to work on that particular brand of bindings."

I worked at a really good shop where the ops manager was quite paranoid about this stuff...they were getting sued about once a year at that point.
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
Nice, glad to hear you found a decent rate. The problem with not taking internet customers at all (it would be interesting if a couple buying groups got together and made that rule, but in reality they don't have the leverage to do so) is that mounting a ski usually gives you two visits from a customer, and chances are pretty good you'll sell them something. Plus it gives you an opportunity to clue them in on when they should come back looking for a deal.
Very good point Garrett, its one of those all or nothing situations, if any one shop will perfrom work on internet purchases, than they all have to. Plus, you are correct, I can just about guarantee that I purchase something I don't need when I drop my gear off...

Now if only it will snow in Michigan... Tahoe in 4 months to the day baby...
post #16 of 16
The Neox is a pretty straightforward binding to install on an Atomic ski, but self-installation is still not recommended for most people. The fine print on the instructions state that warranty & liability coverage requires that installation be done by a qualified technician. Binding manufacturers actually pay for the liability insurance for shops: for this protection, shop techs must be properly & regularly trained, and there are a few other rules they have to abide by (e.g. no working on bindings more than 10 years old).

I would expect a decent shop (and it sounds like you found one) to install for you at pretty much the standard rate even if you didn't buy the gear there. Several shops I deal with waive installation charges when you buy skis/bindings from them, and use the posted cost as the "walk in" service cost. The motivation for the service department to do the installation is to hopefully gain you as a customer for other things -- some tuneups or wax jobs, how about a new pair of gloves?, maybe new gear next year if they can show value for their services.
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › How to install NEOX 4.12 bindings?