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Getting lift on Volkls w/Piston/Motion

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
My Volkl Racetiger SL's are my favorite skis ever. Unfortunately, I have size 15 feet and they are very narrow. Boot out is a major issue.

Does anyone know of anything I can do to get lift with this binding system?
post #2 of 19
Put lift plates on your boots.
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Can you elaborate on that? I don't know anything about it.
post #4 of 19
They are small plastic plates that are glued and screwed onto the toe and heel section of each boot. Any race shop should have them and be able to do it for you.

As an alternative, have you considered just screwing a set of metal edges on to the boot soles themselves?
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer View Post
They are small plastic plates that are glued and screwed onto the toe and heel section of each boot. Any race shop should have them and be able to do it for you.
That sounds great.
Would that make walking in these boots considerably more awkward?
How would it effect my sole length? I am already pretty maxed out on most equipment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer View Post
As an alternative, have you considered just screwing a set of metal edges on to the boot soles themselves?.
Story of my life: tall jokes and big foot jokes. When it comes to skiing and snowboarding, they are really a PITA. When it comes to kicking people who make tall jokes and big foot jokes, they come in handy.
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
Put lift plates on your boots.
Thats your answer. You will have to go to a shop that has the capability not only to install the lifters, but also to machine the toe and heel lugs back into DIN spec. Usually this will also be a shop that has the ability to do sole canting for alignment purposes. Below is a picture of what my Dobies look like with a small amount of lift:



Later

GREG
post #7 of 19
Just as a side note, a lot of people here think Cat Trax are for gapers. If you put on lifters or grind boot soles to cant, you'll need them to keep from slipping. Protecting boots is a good thing and prevents problems like pre-release or release malfunctions from contamination of the boot and AFD.

Please commence ridicule.:
post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
So, by looking at Greg's picture, it looks like they add to the sole and then grind the top of the DIN heel and toe pieces. Is that correct?

If that is true, I can't imagine that you could get much lift..? I am thinking that you can only grind so much off.

I was hoping to get a lot of lift if possible.
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by philsthrills View Post
So, by looking at Greg's picture, it looks like they add to the sole and then grind the top of the DIN heel and toe pieces. Is that correct?

If that is true, I can't imagine that you could get much lift..? I am thinking that you can only grind so much off.

I was hoping to get a lot of lift if possible.
How much lift do you need? I have seen it go quite high... The lugs are solidly on the boots, so I'd imagine that you can grind down quite a large bit of the lug before the structural integity is compromised, and even then, if it is solidly fastened to the boot you should be fine to remove all or most of the lug to create lift. People who have one leg shorter than the other often do this. I have 4mm on my Dobies to put them at the FIS legal height, and will probably do the same with my Fischer SOMA WC 150's this year (along with canting). Remember that the more you lift the boot, the harder on your knees it is going to be.

One other alternative option is to go see a good boot fitter and see about getting into a smaller boot. For example, my foot measures at a size 10 (usually wear 9.5 or 10 street shoe). My ski boots are a UK 6 (US 7). If I wanted to REALLY put some work in I could probably drop down another complete size, but I like how the 6 fits. So with size 15 feet you could probably get into a 12 or 13 shell if you were willing to put the work and time into it (and tolerate the pain until you got the boot fitting properly). IMO, this option would be a lot better for you in the long run because you wouldn't be putting added stress on your knees by lifting your boots too high.

Later

GREG

Oh yeah, Cirque is right about Cattrax. They are definitely a necessity - I use mine quite often.
post #10 of 19
I had 8mm lifters on my boots. Currently have 5mm on my head Rd 96 & will probably go back to 8mm on my new Raptors.
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
My boots are pretty new and they are very comfortable for me. It would really suck to have to get a new boot. I am not into pain.

I don't know how high I need to go - I just don't want to boot out any more. Putting extra stess on my knees does not sound good, either.

What is the maximum lift you can put on a boot? 8mm does not seem like very much.

While we're at it, I recently moved to Pottstown, PA. Does anyone know a good (local) shop that does this kind of work?

Edit: Thanks for all of your help in here. I am going over to the boot fitter forum and do a search as well as post a thread. Please feel free to continue the discussion here or there.
post #12 of 19
Most race plates are in the 16mm range (Atomic WC, Vist two piece slalom, Marker WC Slalom Piston control Plate) You can get about 1/2 the height of a race plate with boot sole plates.
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks.

8mm just does not seem like very much. I can't imagine that 8mm would give me that much more room for higher edge angles.

Hey Atomicman - do you use lift on your really stiff snowboard boots?
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by philsthrills View Post
Thanks.

8mm just does not seem like very much. I can't imagine that 8mm would give me that much more room for higher edge angles.

Hey Atomicman - do you use lift on your really stiff snowboard boots?
Not funny!


I was trying to be helpful.

Afterall at size 15 do you really need skis at all?
post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
Wow, two big foot jokes in one thread.

I'll have you all know, my feet are proportional to the rest of my body (don't go there - I am saying that I am tall).

No, I don't need skis - I can just snowboard.

Snowboarding is my life. Skiing is a hobby.

O.K., back on track - is 8mm really enough to make a difference?
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
One other alternative option is to go see a good boot fitter and see about getting into a smaller boot. For example, my foot measures at a size 10 (usually wear 9.5 or 10 street shoe). My ski boots are a UK 6 (US 7). If I wanted to REALLY put some work in I could probably drop down another complete size, but I like how the 6 fits. So with size 15 feet you could probably get into a 12 or 13 shell if you were willing to put the work and time into it (and tolerate the pain until you got the boot fitting properly). IMO, this option would be a lot better for you in the long run because you wouldn't be putting added stress on your knees by lifting your boots too high.
I've got my 13's into an 11 shell -- the 12 shell would've been perfect, but I was nuts about a close fit.

The amount of work done was truly excessive. It's not just foot length, but width and instep height, heel width, ankle size etc etc. Don't forget the cuff will be smaller too.

You may also need to grind out a significant amount of plastic, so race plugs like Greg uses would be much easier to fit than retail boots.
post #17 of 19
something that hasn't been brought up yet...size 15 boot, in order to use lifter plates you need a solid sole + lugs, boots with removable pads aren't liftable. I'm not aware of any size 15 race level boots. This could eliminate this option.
post #18 of 19
To answer your question, no, 8mm isn't really a lot. Probably not enough to make a difference in your boot out problem. Is your piston interface like the one below on the left?



If so, depending on how handy you are, you could probably add a plate to that. I would get some HMW Polyethylene and cut a piece to match the toe and heel plates of the piston plate. Counter-sink some binding screws to screw your new plates on to your existing plate. Probably 4 holes in front and 4 in back. Placement of the holes could be a little tricky.... you need to make sure you don't drill into the rails under the existing plate, as well as leaving spots to drill for your bindings on your "new" plate.

Find a ambitious and experimental shop guy, and it would actually be pretty easy.
post #19 of 19
I used to mount Marker Selective Control bindings on top of an EPB plate. Of course this diminshed (not really sure if the Selective Contol really made any noticable difference anyway)any influenece the Selective control had on performance.

It seems to me you should be able to mount the Piston bindings on top of a plate. One issue will be how the existing binding mounting holes in your ski align with the new holes needed for a plate. Depending on the plate configuration, it should (probably will)work.
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