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Skiing v. Marathon Training: who wins?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
So, for all you marathoners out there: last year, I skied the first four days of my taper week--pretty much all day--and I don't think it affected my time much. But, this year, I am trying to qualify for Boston, which means I have to run a 3:15, which would be a PR by 20 minutes.

Who thinks I should abstain from the slopes during taper week?

Who thinks I should just ski as much as I want and forget about Boston?

Who thinks cotton candy never tastes as good as it looks like it's going to taste?

I await your collective wisdom.
post #2 of 13
save your body and go ski.
I don't really care for Boston or cotton candy
post #3 of 13
Oct 17, 2007

PCSkier:

Hey, it's "Boston". Taper. Hope you "ace" the marathon and qualify. May the wind always be at your back.

Think snow,

CP

PS: At least on cotton candy, I agree with LoboSkis.
post #4 of 13
20 minutes is alot to PR-do you want to qualify or ski? I would abstain from skiing for my taper and follow my planned training schedule.Just my opinion form a 1 time marathoner! T
post #5 of 13
Well, there's skiing and then there's SKIING. Sliding around the slopes for a few hours recreationally isn't such a big deal. If you're hell-bent on hammering the mountain all day long for 3 or 4 days in a row, that's probably another story.

Had a friend and co-worker who ran the 2002 Boston. He took his taper serious when it came to physical activity. Didn't work so well for him with his sleep however, because work related stuff just wouldn't quit. He was going 18-20 hours a day right up until the day before the race. He finished 48, 2:29 and 20 min off the lead. I don't recall it being a PR for him. He was disappointed, but relieved given his schedule leading up to the race.

If it means a great deal to you, focus on qualifying. If you're counting on a PR to qualify, best to be physically and mentally ready. As said before - 20 min is a lot.
post #6 of 13
Oct 17, 2007

Hi PCSkier:

The more I ponder your question the more I wonder why you can't have your cake and eat it.

I believe that any Boston qualifying times from any marathon which satisfy USTFA length measurement requirements are valid for approximately 1.5 years. The magic start date to qualify for the 2009 Boston is Sept 29, 2007, and a qualifying time after this date will be valid for both 2008 and 2009 Boston. The magic start date to 2008 Boston was Sept 23, 2006 (as published on the Boston Marathon webpage. Please verify though).

If the above is true, why not enter a fall marathon, say October, November or early December (and not a winter marathon) so that you wouldn't have to choose between skiing and training/tapering? As other Bears have mentioned, 20 minutes is a lot to make up. It translates to shaving 45.8 seconds per mile off your best per/mile pace for every mile of the 26.2 miles.

Think snow,

CP
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by medmarkco View Post
He finished 48, 2:29 and 20 min off the lead. I don't recall it being a PR for him. He was disappointed, but relieved given his schedule leading up to the race.
2:29? Whoa. To paraphrase Jack Nicklaus when speaking of Tiger Woods, "he is engaged in an activity with which I am unfamiliar."

I'll be sucking down a Powergel somewhere around mile 20 at 2:29. Fortunately, I will have a good idea whether 3:15 is in the cards in about 8 weeks when I peak out my long runs. Right now, it's looking a little bleak on my pace runs.
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by pcskier View Post
2:29? Whoa. To paraphrase Jack Nicklaus when speaking of Tiger Woods, "he is engaged in an activity with which I am unfamiliar."

I'll be sucking down a Powergel somewhere around mile 20 at 2:29. Fortunately, I will have a good idea whether 3:15 is in the cards in about 8 weeks when I peak out my long runs. Right now, it's looking a little bleak on my pace runs.
Yeah, how about that for a normal work-a-day stiff? Pretty cool, I thought.

Mental determination. You're going to make it!!
post #9 of 13
Go ski and get your mind off of Boston for a day!

The best triathlon I had this summer was one that I went into with the attitude that I just wanted to improve my best time. I was totally relaxed about the whole thing! I wound up getting 3rd and only missed 2nd by 18/100ths of a second.

Go enjoy the beauty of the day and clear your head for the big race!

Best of luck!!!!
post #10 of 13
My daughter runs marathons and is training for one right now and is on a training cycle . As long as to keep to your training program that should tell you whether you should go or not.
As the event draws near your physical preparation should be your focus but in the weeks before why not. ? It's only the last few days where you store your fitness and taper off your running .
Running 18 miles or more and then skiing might be a bit of a strain so it would only matter where you are that week in your program.
post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowmiser View Post
Go ski and get your mind off of Boston for a day!
A DAY? See, that's the problem. I have the whole week before the marathon off from work, and I just don't know how I can be 100 yds from Quittin Time and not strap 'em on EVERY day.

I keep finding more rationalization for my compulsion too. I just read in this month's Runner's World that most people taper TOO MUCH. Don't want to do that. If today's run is any indication, 3:15 ain't going to happen anyway. How's that for positive thinking?
post #12 of 13
Come on pcskier!!! that's not the right attitude! You'r gonna do great! Your at the top of your game --- You're running Boston for pete's sake!

Have a few 16oz. carbs and chill out! 3:15 will happen if you believe you can make it happen!

Good luck to ya!
post #13 of 13
I skied four way in college, sl, jump, gs, xc, all in a two day meet. A little bit of alpine skiing in the morning, (two runs of gs plus course inspection) made the 10K xc ski in the afternoon much harder. Take a break, and taper.
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