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Skiing in a storm - Page 2

post #31 of 46
I love it. There's that feeling of excitement and the unknown as you rip down a trail, unable to see 20m ahead of you. My first true experience with it was I believe at Snowbird when I was little. I got off Little Cloud with my family and we couldn't see a thing. I turned around and the lift was gone. I looked for the tram.. nada. Naturally I wanted to follow some others down into Mineral Basin but my parents had a different plan so we slowly made our way back to the base.
post #32 of 46
yeah the upper part of of snowbird is not fun in a storm avoid at all cost. Gad 2 is where its at.
post #33 of 46
neither is the upper part of Whistler/Blackcomb.

my dad and i were there several seasons ago in the spring and experienced the area's legendary (or is it notorious) quick change weather.

we were skiing mid-mountain and then went to the tip top (pretty sure it was the top of Whistler Mtn). it had been fairly clear mid-mountain and it appeared clear up top. however mid-way through the lift ride it got socked in, the wind kicked up and we pushed headlong into whiteout conditions.

me, i just got off the lift and pointed downhill (there were red trail markers). my poor dad got flustered. while i was just a few feet in front of him (i didn't completely ditch him!) he couldn't see anything and being quite a bit older wasn't cottoning to the total loss of visibility. thankfully somebody came down behind him and played guide (i think it was a patroller). we got back down to the mid-mountain area, where it had "mysteriously" cleared up again, in one piece. but neither of us hit the top again that day.

my dad is great to ski with, but since he's pushing beyond 75 he doesn't rip like he used to (he was on patrol at Sugar Bowl in the 1970s) and pretty much sticks to groomers and mellow weather these days. but back in the day he was Mr. Up A 6am-on-the-slopes-by-8:30-ski-through-last-chair mofo who wouldn't put up with any whiney crap from his bitchy kid (me).

post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
my dad is great to ski with, but since he's pushing beyond 75 he doesn't rip like he used to (he was on patrol at Sugar Bowl in the 1970s) and pretty much sticks to groomers and mellow weather these days. but back in the day he was Mr. Up A 6am-on-the-slopes-by-8:30-ski-through-last-chair mofo who wouldn't put up with any whiney crap from his bitchy kid (me).

Sounds like you're proud of your old man. Good on both of you!
post #35 of 46
^i guess.

for years he's been the only person willing to go skiing with me!



it does suck that i'm finally enjoying off-piste and he's backed down to blues and greens (he loves School Marm @ Keystone when we go to Colo and is partial to Breck, as well...2 seasons ago we stayed on Peak 8 and I rode the top part and T-bar all day and he rode down mid-low mountain, meeting up for lunch.

but the fact that he's still out there...just bought some new B2's, as well...and willing to travel is cool.

thankfully i stumbled upon Epic and TGR so I could find some other like-minded fools to ride with since it's just my dad and my cousin out of the family who still ski (and I had to suck the cousin back into the mix 2 seasons ago!...funny how contagious it can be when you have the one crazy fox in the family that buys skis all year, talks about skiing all year, and sends out stoke email blasts at least once a month!)
post #36 of 46
i just remembered another storm story:

Dad, me, and my two cousins at Squaw. Cousins and i are a year apart in successive age. we were probably all in elementary school. both our families would take us out of school for like 2 weeks every year to go skiing.

at any rate dad takes me, Eric, and Sten (the cousins) up to the top of Emigrant @ Squaw. Now by today's standards that's a pretty mild run. but back when we were still growing rugrats that was some steep shizz.

i remember crying and screaming at the top because it was windy and blowing snow and we couldn't see jack. i remember braile riding and cherry picking down to the treeline. that was the worst stuff i had ever skied. i believe it was windblown and icy and limited visibility. i think my dad kept cajoling us to make it to the trees where it would be more protected. i know at least once or twice i totally copped out and fell to the run and just sat there sniveling (I'm pretty sure one of my cousins did the same).

thank god "Sack Up!" wasn't in pop's vocab!

it's funny to rip down runs now some 30 years later that seemed so "gnarly" and intimidating when you were only a few feet high and now they seem like cake walks.
post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
yeah the upper part of of snowbird is not fun in a storm avoid at all cost. Gad 2 is where its at.
Have had good storm day skiing at SB making laps on Peruvian-interesting terrain
post #38 of 46
At Whistler it would dump and that was the best. However, up high in the bowls above tree line the visibility was terrible, flat light. That didn't matter on the flatter stuff but on the steeps it was a test of memory and faith.

Some of my best days ever were storm days. In the east you can usually see.
post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
yeah the upper part of of snowbird is not fun in a storm avoid at all cost. Gad 2 is where its at.
Haha, yeah. I'm pretty sure we sidestepped our way up to the tram and took Chips Run (I think..) down just because it's a green and we couldn't see a thing.
post #40 of 46
I'd rather be skiing in a storm at Squaw than driving over Donner Summit.

post #41 of 46
Making laps and your own tracks are filled in because it's nuking so hard it's dark outside. Stopping in the Trees, erie how peaceful and silent it is. You look up to see thousands of Snowflakes floating down from the sky. For a moment your alone in a special place.
post #42 of 46
Just make sure there is a way to find your way back to the lift if your on the back side and the road doesn't curve around the bottom.
post #43 of 46
Skiing in a storm is kind of a rarity here in my stretch of the woods.
But I was fortunate enough to be out skiing last Valentines day at Okemo.
Now Okemo is not exactly a real mountain in my books, but add snow falling at the rate of over ten inches an hour, and you've got a good time.
Every trail was fresh and new, regardless of how many time I have skied it in the past.
And having tracks totally filled in by the next run down it was something else. Especially here in New England.
I definately enjoyed every joyous laugh filled run.

Mike
post #44 of 46

Bring on the Snow..

Ive been very fortunate the last 2 trips out west.

In 2001 me and some friends went to Steamboat. It was a bad year for snow (though Steamboat had plenty for skiing). In fact it was in the 60's in Denver when we arrived (early March).

It was warm and slushy the whole week, till the last 2 days. Then a huge storm moved in and it snowed 22" in 2 days! It was amazing! When you got to the top of the mountain you couldnt see much more than 2 feet in front of you, but man it made for some great skiing!

In 2005 my wife and I went to Beaver Creek. Some of you may remember in Febuary there was a storm that brought like 47" in like 7 or 8 days. I was there that WHOLE week!!! Amazing!

I love skiing in storms!
post #45 of 46
Dookey67, it's great that you can still ski with your father. My husband and I hope to ski into our 80's and beyond, so anyone over 70 is an inspiration to us.

You sound like our kind of obsessive person - thinking and dreaming about skiing all year long. As soon as the season is over we start training for the next one and figuring out ways to make it better. We should meet this next weekend.

Another whiteout story - us skiing Vail for the first time, from the East, not that great a skier, don't have a clue what to do in powder. Sudden whiteout in Game Creek Bowl, no clue where we are, took easiest trail that wraps around the top of the bowl to the left, but eventually you have to head down the hill. Begging hubby not to get too far ahead of me. It's amazing the difference that not being able to see makes in your perception even when you are familiar with the area (which of course we weren't.)

Many recollections of getting "stuck" on runs that are now a piece of cake to ski. Now we love steeps and powder but I draw the line at cliffs. Have had to jump off a few when following hubby into unknown terrain. Now I just go my own way.
post #46 of 46
Fancy skiing in this?

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