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Ski Recommendation?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I'm getting back into skiing this winter after taking about 10 years off. Back when I did ski I'd say I was an average skier. I now need to buy new skis and have heard great things about the Volkl Tigershark 10. Is this too much of a ski for an intermediate? I don't like buying cheap stuff. I'd rather buy something good and use it for a bunch of years instead of having to buy something cheaper and then later realize I need something better. Maybe another suggestion? I live in Ontario, Canada where the skiing is on small hills. I've read the TS is a good eastern ski. Any advice would be greatly appreciated and thanks in advance.
post #2 of 24
Well after I took a few years off due to the university debt/career building/family starting thing..... I hit a bunch of used ski sales....ebay...etc until it dawned on me "damn...the skis are the cheapest part of the equation compared to gas, lift tickets, lodging. Do I really want to be cursing a cheap pair of skis everytime I go out?"

the answer was "No" so I shellled out for some good ones and couldn't have been happier.

Not that you can't get some decent skis for a good price.....hell now that I am older ...that is the best part of skiing.....making up for deteriorating body parts by being able to buy the best sh!t.

Can't comment on those skis. Would need more info about your style before anyone could really answer this question.

GS turns? Bumps? Quick turns? What do you like? What's your stats?
post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deemo View Post
Well after I took a few years off due to the university debt/career building/family starting thing..... I hit a bunch of used ski sales....ebay...etc until it dawned on me "damn...the skis are the cheapest part of the equation compared to gas, lift tickets, lodging. Do I really want to be cursing a cheap pair of skis everytime I go out?"

the answer was "No" so I shellled out for some good ones and couldn't have been happier.

Not that you can't get some decent skis for a good price.....hell now that I am older ...that is the best part of skiing.....making up for deteriorating body parts by being able to buy the best sh!t.

Can't comment on those skis. Would need more info about your style before anyone could really answer this question.

GS turns? Bumps? Quick turns? What do you like? What's your stats?
Thanks. Well I'm 40 and I guess GS turns best describes my skiing. Not too into the moguls or quick turns. I'm about 5'8" and weigh 170 lbs.
post #4 of 24
How about an Atomic Metron M11:B5?
Rossi Bandit B2's?
post #5 of 24
Thread Starter 
Wow thanks for all the great advice people. 140 odd views and 1 reply. I could have got more help from the car forum I frequent. Thanks anyways.
post #6 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kid Eh View Post
Wow thanks for all the great advice people. 140 odd views and 1 reply. I could have got more help from the car forum I frequent. Thanks anyways.
Post it on Autopia?????
That might be interesting.
post #7 of 24
Kid Eh, welcome to Epic, maybe it's a slow time here in the neighborhood. Sarcasm can be great in the right place. Your last post was maybe a bit "under the top." Good luck on your ski selection. MANNERS! we don't need no stinking Manners
post #8 of 24
Well, really you still didn't give a lot of detail. Where do you live? What kind of terrain is there? What kind of runs to you like to ski? Fast? Slow? Medium? Park? Powder? Groomed? Ice? Unlike even 10 years ago, there are many many many kinds of skis out there now. First you gotta decide what you want to do. You did give a bit of info in your follow up post but that's really just scratchy the surface. There are way the heck too many skis and too many variables for someone to say by brand X model Y.

My advice would be to go to a good local shop, ask for recommendations here if need be. Buy the best boots you can based on the advice of a good bootfitter (rare beast but essential for you to find one). Then, you have some options on skis. You could rely on the shop for a recommendation. You could just demo for a while and see what kind of ski you like. You could buy something cheap and ski it for a year until you decide what you really want. You can sometimes get new skis from a season or two ago for as little as $200-$250. Might look for a deal for the first season or two back.
post #9 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by learn2turn View Post
Well, really you still didn't give a lot of detail. Where do you live? What kind of terrain is there? What kind of runs to you like to ski? Fast? Slow? Medium? Park? Powder? Groomed? Ice? Unlike even 10 years ago, there are many many many kinds of skis out there now. First you gotta decide what you want to do. You did give a bit of info in your follow up post but that's really just scratchy the surface. There are way the heck too many skis and too many variables for someone to say by brand X model Y.

My advice would be to go to a good local shop, ask for recommendations here if need be. Buy the best boots you can based on the advice of a good bootfitter (rare beast but essential for you to find one). Then, you have some options on skis. You could rely on the shop for a recommendation. You could just demo for a while and see what kind of ski you like. You could buy something cheap and ski it for a year until you decide what you really want. You can sometimes get new skis from a season or two ago for as little as $200-$250. Might look for a deal for the first season or two back.
Thanks. Thats more like it. I just figured I was a newbie and wasn't worthy of anyones time. As I stated before I'm in the east in Ontario. We have hills here no mountains. Powder is just a pipe dream. I like to ski "medium" I guess. Just cruising down making big turns. Nothing too crazy. I just want an easy cruising ski. I've heard a lot about the TS 10 and was considering it. Don't know if it's too much for me. I've since found a few others. Amazing what a search button will do. Anyways sorry if I came across as an ass.

Cheers
post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kid Eh View Post
Wow thanks for all the great advice people. 140 odd views and 1 reply. I could have got more help from the car forum I frequent. Thanks anyways.
Next time, use a little longer title that's a bit more descriptive. After you hang around here for a couple weeks, you'll see so many "help with picking a ski" thread you just don't know if you have anything to say!!!

To the real issue. I also came back to the slope last season after some years off. And the best advice my buds offered was DEMO!!!

I'm guessing the skis you used to use were narrow, straight and long! If so, you'll find the new shaped skis performs differently. So much so you may find you now love to do things you used to avoid!

Demo a couple of skis, AND take a lesson or two to "update" your skill. Only then, when you got some idea what you like and dislike of the new crop of skis, you may come back here and ask recommendations of more specific models.
post #11 of 24
"I just figured I was a newbie and wasn't worthy of anyones time."

#1: work on the self-esteem issues. If you feel you're not worth anyone's time then you won't be.



Seriously, though, as said earlier, a bit more info would be crucial.

start with:

height
weight
age (though that's not always super relevant)
last ski you owned that you loved (even if it's 10 years old it will still give folks an idea of what you were on and what you might like to be steered toward).
average days on a hill a season
type of terrain you ski the most (groomers, off-piste, bumps, etc)
will you be skiing predominantly in the East or West
what you are hoping to get out of the ski

also, if nobody has mentioned it, you should get boots first then worry about the skis (especially if you've been out of the mix for 10 years...the boots are tres importante!)



and yes, DEMO!

also, the ski mags all put out their Buyer's Guides back in September. See if you can snag a copy of SKI, Skiing, Freeskier, Powder and read their reviews. While not a perfect solution, it should help you to narrow down some choices (they tend to all break the skis into general categores like All Mountain Cruiser, All Mountain Expert, Aspiring Expert, Powder Skis, Big Mountain Skis, etc). Good place to start to get a general idea of what's out there and what might appeal to you and your skill/style. The mags may also have portions of the guide online, just check their respective websites.

Basically, I was in the same boat you were 3 seasons ago. I just visited a lot of shops and told them what I had been riding (Rossi 7S in a 198). I told them what I liked about the ski (fast, stable at speed, quick turning) and what I hated about the ski (long, cumbersome in powder) and then they started giving suggestions. I wrote the suggestions down. Then I read the skiing mags and picked some likely candidates from there based on what I knew I wanted from a ski. Then I started demoing. Best thing to do when demoing is find a shop that will let you demo multiple pairs in a day. this will usually be a shop at/near a resort. in fact on mountain is optimal as you can usually ski in, swap out for a new pair, ski out (Northstar in Tahoe offers this, so does Beaver Creek and a few other resorts with villages and shops right there on the mountain).
post #12 of 24
On the note of the Tigershark 10, it has a halfway radius for sl and gs. I liked it when I got them for the day at Loon. Did well in everything on piste (didnt try bumps though). Another one that you might like would be the Racetiger RC, another demo day favourite of mine. I would say that they would suit intermediats to advanced/experts.
post #13 of 24
Volkl TS 10
Fischer RX6/8
Elan Speedwave 12,
Head Monster 72 or 78, iXRC 800, Supershape Magnum
Dynastar Contact 9/11, Legend 4800

For a somewhat stiffer, more demanding ride, consider:

Volkl RaceTiger RC
Fischer WC RC
post #14 of 24
Head M72 170cm, Elan M666 176 cm.
recommend to demo these, but may be hard to find.
post #15 of 24
i'd agree with 'at nyc', if you're not certain, demo. if you demo, get the demo price appied to purchase and if possible, know a good value price from the web. my skiing started when my wife called and told me i was to ski at least once each yr for a week long family vacation. your age and and weight, of course, slightly taller in gravity boots!

anyhow, there's tons of eq out there that is very good, least from my level of skill now, 8 yrs later. i have the elan 666 just last yr after 5 yrs of salomon verse 7's (quite soft, more park skis', but cheap) and found the 168's around right. longer fine, if you like speed.

but, as mentioned in posts, the i would demo. IMHO, 170 or slightly less would be fine if your your into crusing, slightly longer if your into speed. you need to pick your mix if a single ski .. groomed x% vrs powder. i really found that for me, with less finesse and more forcing an turn, i like stiffer ski's and a boot that's tight and aimed at intermeds or above. personally, i like a boot that tight in length and takes a bit of lean to flex .. so, i guess, i'm saying it may help when demo'ing once you find the right boot, try a few ski's at a max length, then move down one and try that.
post #16 of 24
Look up any posts by Sierra Jim and others in the ski review section. Jim runs a shop, skis everything and is realistic and objective. I'd look at anything famous for edgehold, Volkl, Atomic, Head... and look at forgiving expert skis- These are older examples, but great skis- The Volkl 5* was (and is) one I owned and liked, and the Dynastar 8000, more of a western ski-adequate on ice but good in powder. Both were tolerent of less than perfect technique but delivered great performance when driven. Do some research, have fun, and make a list to demo.
post #17 of 24
Thread Starter 
WOW!!!! Thanks so much everyone. This will help tons. I mentioned TS because I have a connection with Volkl and can get them at a discount. I have since found the Volkl Bridge to be an option. The last pairs of skis I had were some Blizzard 205's and a pair of K2 190's. Don't remember the models. I remember going from the 205's to the 190's and hating them. I seemed to ski better on the 205's.
post #18 of 24
Thread Starter 
Well I pretty much have the ski narrowed down now what about sizing? The search button brought me many varying results. I know theres many factors involved here but with my stats and 4 available sizes what do you guys recommend? The choices are 161, 169, 177, 185.
I'm an intermediate about 5'7" - 5'8" and weigh about 170 - 180 LBS. Most of my skiing will be done on groomed hills in the east. Thanks.
post #19 of 24
Thread Starter 
*bump*
post #20 of 24
man, you're an immpatient sucker, aren't you? (i.e. you bump your own threads less than 24 hours after they've posted).



best to demo a few sizes before buying.

try before you buy is no lie!



Here's a really basic guideline for sizing:

http://www.skis.com/guides/guide_skis.html
post #21 of 24
A lot of folks probably read your first thread and, like me, not having been on the Tiger sharks decided to let someone better qualified answer your question.

I suggest about a 165 or 170 cm ski.

Atomic SX12 or 11 if you know how to carve a turn, SX10 isn't too far behind. Atomics have a nice solid feel to them. The SX11 or 12 will handle any speeds you will be able to find on Blue Mountain or anywhere else that's on a trail map in Ontario.

Fischer RX8, or WC SC for shorter turns and RX9 or WC RC for longer turns. Again these should be good for Ontario skiing. The Fischer RX8 will be easier to carve turns on at slower speeds on small hills. The Fischers will feel lighter and livlier than the atomics, but will handle the speed fine if you know how to control them.

Rossi 9S, or VS or whatever the newest iteration OVERSIZE is. A great carving ski. Feels a little damper and more flexible and easy going.

Salomon Equipe series. SC or GC depending your your turn radius size is also a joy to ski on our smaller hills. Quick and precise.

I haven't been on the Volkls, but I think the advertisers like to flatter there customers by telling them the skis are for "experts". I would be surprised if it is all that hard to manage.


I haven't tried a dynastar since they had the crossmax series. They were ok skis, a little more versatile than the other's in terms of being accomodating to different styles of skiing. I hear the Contact 9 is good choice.

Can't really go wrong with any of the above. You might want to pay $25. to realskiers.com and check out their reviews from the last few years and keep an eye open for sales.

I think you should try to get a ski with a radius of about 15 m.
post #22 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
man, you're an immpatient sucker, aren't you? (i.e. you bump your own threads less than 24 hours after they've posted).



best to demo a few sizes before buying.

try before you buy is no lie!



Here's a really basic guideline for sizing:

http://www.skis.com/guides/guide_skis.html

Sorry for being impatient but I'm going to the U.S. to get the skis in a day or so and wanted to have the info before I left. Thanks for the input.
post #23 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
A lot of folks probably read your first thread and, like me, not having been on the Tiger sharks decided to let someone better qualified answer your question.

I suggest about a 165 or 170 cm ski.

Atomic SX12 or 11 if you know how to carve a turn, SX10 isn't too far behind. Atomics have a nice solid feel to them. The SX11 or 12 will handle any speeds you will be able to find on Blue Mountain or anywhere else that's on a trail map in Ontario.

Fischer RX8, or WC SC for shorter turns and RX9 or WC RC for longer turns. Again these should be good for Ontario skiing. The Fischer RX8 will be easier to carve turns on at slower speeds on small hills. The Fischers will feel lighter and livlier than the atomics, but will handle the speed fine if you know how to control them.

Rossi 9S, or VS or whatever the newest iteration OVERSIZE is. A great carving ski. Feels a little damper and more flexible and easy going.

Salomon Equipe series. SC or GC depending your your turn radius size is also a joy to ski on our smaller hills. Quick and precise.

I haven't been on the Volkls, but I think the advertisers like to flatter there customers by telling them the skis are for "experts". I would be surprised if it is all that hard to manage.


I haven't tried a dynastar since they had the crossmax series. They were ok skis, a little more versatile than the other's in terms of being accomodating to different styles of skiing. I hear the Contact 9 is good choice.

Can't really go wrong with any of the above. You might want to pay $25. to realskiers.com and check out their reviews from the last few years and keep an eye open for sales.

I think you should try to get a ski with a radius of about 15 m.
FANTASTIC!!!!! Think I have all the info I need. Thanks.
post #24 of 24
Words can never describe what any given ski will feel like to any given person. Can't agree more with the advice to demo before you buy. Best way is to try to attend a "demo day" at some ski area where you can try different models and lengths in a relatively short period of time. Pick very slightly challenging run and ski it over and over with the different skis. You may discover very quickly that you hate something that sounded oh so good.
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