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Base Wax - now what ?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
After getting bindings mounted on some new skis I cleaned the bases with a base cleaner qaccprding to the instructions and then applied a coat of base wax. Since it had no instructions I rubbed it on in a circular then back and forth motion then lightly brushed it tip to tail with a nylon brush. I can barely see it coating the skis and get a barely visible line when I rub my fingertips across it.

Now since this was intended to be an off season protection cover I am now ready to wax them for actual use. My impression is that I can apply regular wax on top of the base coat and just continue waxing periodically through the season. OR.. do I take the base wax coat off by scraping as much as I can off and then apply the regular wax more direct to the bases?


Tom
post #2 of 14
There should be no discernable amount of wax on the skis, so if you can scratch some with your nails then you need to do some more scraping.

Once done with that, you can then do the wax of the day, or a universal wax if you wish.

Then again, you can just leave it as is and do nothing else; some people like to ski with a heavy coat of wax in the early season to protect that bases against shallow snow cover. The difference will really be how well your skis will slide. Having any wax is better than none, and what you have on there may prove to be a little sticky when on the snow but it will wear off. The choice is yours.

Oh forgot to ask, was this wax the rub on variety that did not require an iron? If so then that may not be sufficient, and may be intended as an overlay or quick-fix type of wax. Wax should be ironed on; at least if its the first waxing.
post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tbarb View Post
do I take the base wax coat off by scraping as much as I can off and then apply the regular wax more direct to the bases?
That's the ticket.

Scrape off all that nasty summer schmutz that the storage wax successfully protected the bases from.
post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
Oh forgot to ask, was this wax the rub on variety that did not require an iron? If so then that may not be sufficient, and may be intended as an overlay or quick-fix type of wax. Wax should be ironed on; at least if its the first waxing.[/quote]
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Yes, the base wax was a rub on. I can scrape all off all of it that will come off with a scraper and then iron on the "wax of the day" as you call it. So no problem in applying the wax of the day over the rub on base wax.

Thank you
post #5 of 14
Tbarb, the rub on variety waxes, do not penetrate the base, they really just sit on top (It seems Maplus might have something new thats works differently though?). Typically, you need wax to be melted on in order to get in the ski. The heat helps open the pores and the wax to get into the bases.
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
Tbarb, the rub on variety waxes, do not penetrate the base, they really just sit on top (It seems Maplus might have something new thats works differently though?). Typically, you need wax to be melted on in order to get in the ski. The heat helps open the pores and the wax to get into the bases.

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Hmm, not sure how to take this last comment - so if I iron on the wax of the day the rub on first put on below it will be in the way? OR The heat will be just what is now needed to penetrate the ski bases and all will be OK?
post #7 of 14
Rub on waxes are typically just that, rub on, quick fix, then hit the slopes. I use them to touch up in between ironed on waxings. or on a long day of skiing, or when racing in between runs.

Now when you say rub on, did you cork it in as well? Which brand, type are you using?

The rub on wax, can be in the way (blocking access into the ski pores), especially if it is high in flouro. Dr. D posts here and is a wax expert and manufacturer hopefully he will chime in on this.

What I would do is remove all the the rub on wax you have on there now (a base cleaner might be best in this instance, others might say a hot scraping). The rub on did its job, protected the skis over the summer. But now start with a clean slate. Buy some base-prep/universal wax, melt it on, scrape, brush. Do this again, but with whatever wax you want for the conditions you will be skiing (wax of the day), or a universal wax. Done.
post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
The rub on wax product was: Alpine Ski Alpin - White Lightening Base Wax. A small instuction appears on jar cover which says: Clean base, apply, allow to dry 5 min. It was not "corked" simply rubbed on and brushed in.

I know I need to use iron on waxes for the season, and what I need to know before I put the first coats of these is if the rub on all has to come off first. And after taking it off then applying the iron on wax directly to the bases for several layers.

However, if I can just scrape all I can get off then immediately apply the iron on wax it would of course be easier as I know the bases are clean (except for the rub on wax).
post #9 of 14
My recommendation would be to a) scrape what you can, b)take a warm wax, melt it on, iron quickly, then immediately scrape again, to get the bases clean, then c) wax on a good universal or cold weather wax into the bases.

Never use "base cleaner" except to clean your tools. Once they have been waxed in, the base cleaner messes up the wax in the bases and creates pockets of uneven wax penetration.
post #10 of 14
I'm with Harry here. I would try to get all of the rub on wax off. As suggested, I would do that by hot scraping with a warm temp wax (Toko yellow or Swix CH10 work fine). Melt the wax into the ski and then scrape it before it cools. The scrapings should be white. If they look dirty, repeat the process.
Brush out the ski as a final step.
To load the bases with wax, reapply the warm temp wax. Allow it to cool. Reiron and add more wax where you can see the structure of the base or where the iron drags. Repeat this four times then scrape and brush. Bases are now "adequately" filled with wax. (You could do more, but this is sufficient unless you are racing.)
Apply the wax of the day. Scrape and brush.
What you are doing is:
1. Hot scraping to clean out the bases and remove the rub on wax
2. Filling the bases with wax
3. Applying the wax of the day to a well conditioned base.
post #11 of 14

If this is it, then remove it all, its high flouro (fast but short lasting and clogs pores), you can use it as a your wax of the day or on top of your wax of the day.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry_Morgan View Post
My recommendation would be to a) scrape what you can, b)take a warm wax, melt it on, iron quickly, then immediately scrape again, to get the bases clean, then c) wax on a good universal or cold weather wax into the bases.

Never use "base cleaner" except to clean your tools. Once they have been waxed in, the base cleaner messes up the wax in the bases and creates pockets of uneven wax penetration.
Between steps a & b, I would probably brush it with a stiff combi or brass brush just for good measure. It'll open the bases up a tad as well.
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all. Think I got it now.
Tom
post #14 of 14
You can tell a highly fluorinated base by looking at the edge of molten wax: dripped CH will bead up instead of wetting out.

I have no problems with using base cleaner then.

caveat cerator: that also happens with very hard wax on cool bases.
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