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Getting (A Little) Air

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Sorry in advance if this has been covered previously. I did a search and didn't see any matches.

What tips would you give to someone who wants to start taking a little air -- someone who's of a, hmm, somewhat advanced age and who has no intention of ever going bigger than, say 10 feet onto extremely soft snow? Make that 4-5 feet.

Thanks!
post #2 of 17
10 foot drop or 10 foot table(very small table)?
post #3 of 17
Good post, say 10 drop, not a table.
post #4 of 17
well 10 foot drop into extremely soft snow...

allways jump of the end of the cliff(dont just fall), choosing where your going to go not letting gravity choose for you. Keep you arms out in front and low, suck up you knees. The best way to do this is going to be tight and compact.

When landing if its super deep soft snow and your not on something bigger you going to want land pulling your toes up so you dont tip dive(big skis will take away this problem), you also want to extend your legs to almost straight upong landing you want to use musclaclar tension to absorb as much as possiable. If you land and you off balance a turn is the quicker way to regain your balance.


some more tips

1. The above I just posted is way to much thinking, that what I do but most of that is prety natural at least to me.
2. Big Wide ski help with this.
3.dont ever ski at less than 100 percent its good way to get hurt.
4.I ski at the bird or alta nearl everyday if you PM me I would be glad to go do some smaller drops with you.
post #5 of 17
These are more observations than advice:
  • File a flight plan, and never deviate from it.
  • # of take-offs should always equal # of landings
  • Avoid flat landings like the plague
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
...
4.I ski at the bird or alta nearl everyday if you PM me I would be glad to go do some smaller drops with you.
To expand on this, most areas have lots of good smaller drops with nice (steep, unobstructed) landings. Either local info or just looking for these yourself and also watching how people setup for and ski or ride out of the drop can be a good way to go. You can start at 2 feet or so and have a great deal of fun working your way up gradually.
post #7 of 17
thanks, how much speed at launch time?
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
thanks, how much speed at launch time?
No one answer because of variations in drops, conditions and individuals. Enough to clear what you're dropping off; not so much you overshoot where you want to land. Some forward momentum helps. Part of starting small and learning and watching others.
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
thanks, how much speed at launch time?
My question too... I know, the answer is "enough."

I once went off a 3 ft drop (actually, more of a trail obstruction than a recreational feature) in a flat section of trail and my tails scraped on the wall on the way down. Does that mean I was going too slow, or not leaning forward enough?
post #10 of 17
3-5' drops are farily easy, you can drop off or carry a little speed, hands forward, legs up or a little bent, I have never gone more than that to date....
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Altanaut View Post

What tips would you give to someone who wants to start taking a little air -- someone who's of a, hmm, somewhat advanced age and who has no intention of ever going bigger than, say 10 feet onto extremely soft snow? Make that 4-5 feet.
the basics:

-when learning, be sure to find a spot that has a wide open landing area or runout. The last thing you want to worry about is having to crank some quick turns immediately after stomping your landing. give yourself plenty of room to let the skis run in case you're not 100% in control after landing.

-check your landing. especially important if it's an area you're not familiar with or a cliff that you haven't hit before. Check out the bottom of the cliff and visualize where you want to land. Poke around the snow with your pole. You'll want to look for any buried rocks, but mainly you want to ge a feel for the consistency of the snow in the landing. i.e. is it five feet of fluff? is it 6 inches on top of a crusty layer? This will help prepare you for what the landing will feel like when you touch down.

-check your takeoff. What I mean here is just choose a cliff when learning that has snow right up to it's edge so you don't have to 'pre-jump' over any 'shark's teeth' or anything. And make sure there aren't any rocks at the the lip of the takeoff just under the snow surface that can grab your skis on take off and throw you off balance. If it's powder at the lip of the jump, and no one has hit it before you, you might want to just pack the snow down a bit so you know you'll have a predictable smooth takeoff point. (this can be especially important in Utah if you have an early season dump of light snow w/o much of a base).

-after checking the takeoff and landing. VISUALIZE. Sight where you intend to land and visualize yourself doing just that. Run it through your head a few times. Imagine the speed you'll want to be going to hit your landing. maybe watch others hit it first to get a sense of what's working for them.

-At takeoff stay nice and loose and balanced in an athletic stance. If it's only 4-5 feet, you won't have to get into too tight of a ball like you might see some guys do who take larger airs....on a small air like this you'll really only be airborne for a half a second (that's it!) so you'll only have time to bring your knees up a little.

-in the air, just stay loose, bring your knees up just a bit so you can be ready to stomp the landing and keep your eyes where you want to go. For a 4 -5 foot air, you're only going to be in the air for a split second, so you'll just have enough time to bring your feet up a little. Maybe something akin to this:


-on landing, it's important to think about PUSHING your feet into the snow. This is very important. Don't let the snow push your feet and knees up to you, but be aggresive and actively push your feet down into the snow to meet the landing. However, don't reach out with your feet too early as this will cause you to hit the landing too extended which you don't want to do either. But this is how you'll 'stomp' the landing. If you're too passive, and let the snow/ground push up into you...then you'll have a higher chance of getting bucked or thrown off balance. Show that landing who's boss!! Don't let the landing just 'catch you', you're in control!!

-after landing, ski way, hoot and holler, slap high fives, then go back and do it again!....OR head straight to the bar or the internet and rave about the 40 footer you just hit

other than those basics....just relax, have fun, and don't shoot your eye out
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post

I once went off a 3 ft drop (actually, more of a trail obstruction than a recreational feature) in a flat section of trail and my tails scraped on the wall on the way down. Does that mean I was going too slow, or not leaning forward enough?
definitely going too slow.

OR...

maybe your speed was fine and you just needed to 'pop' a little at the lip of the drop to allow the speed that you were carrying to carry you out away from the feature a bit more.
post #13 of 17
GREAT INFO! I really appreciate it from someone who really throws 150's! I didn't really understand the importance of stomping the landing.
post #14 of 17
Its already been said but I just wanted to reinterate a couple points.

Check the landing. Then, recheck it. A couple of us were practicing back flips in a drift off a fallen tree. There was a cow fence directly underneath our landing zone.:

The push on the landing. I've had my knees hit me in the face so hard I thought I knocked my teeth out.:
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thank You!

Thanks for the great replies. Bushwacker, I may take you up on your offer. (Did I mention I'm old enough to be your mother?

Altanaut
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post
Its already been said but I just wanted to reinterate a couple points.

Check the landing. Then, recheck it. A couple of us were practicing back flips in a drift off a fallen tree. There was a cow fence directly underneath our landing zone.:

The push on the landing. I've had my knees hit me in the face so hard I thought I knocked my teeth out.:

that could have really ruined your day!
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
the basics:

-when learning, be sure to find a spot that has a wide open landing area or runout. The last thing you want to worry about is having to crank some quick turns immediately after stomping your landing. give yourself plenty of room to let the skis run in case you're not 100% in control after landing.

-check your landing. especially important if it's an area you're not familiar with or a cliff that you haven't hit before. Check out the bottom of the cliff and visualize where you want to land. Poke around the snow with your pole. You'll want to look for any buried rocks, but mainly you want to ge a feel for the consistency of the snow in the landing. i.e. is it five feet of fluff? is it 6 inches on top of a crusty layer? This will help prepare you for what the landing will feel like when you touch down.

-check your takeoff. What I mean here is just choose a cliff when learning that has snow right up to it's edge so you don't have to 'pre-jump' over any 'shark's teeth' or anything. And make sure there aren't any rocks at the the lip of the takeoff just under the snow surface that can grab your skis on take off and throw you off balance. If it's powder at the lip of the jump, and no one has hit it before you, you might want to just pack the snow down a bit so you know you'll have a predictable smooth takeoff point. (this can be especially important in Utah if you have an early season dump of light snow w/o much of a base).

-after checking the takeoff and landing. VISUALIZE. Sight where you intend to land and visualize yourself doing just that. Run it through your head a few times. Imagine the speed you'll want to be going to hit your landing. maybe watch others hit it first to get a sense of what's working for them.

-At takeoff stay nice and loose and balanced in an athletic stance. If it's only 4-5 feet, you won't have to get into too tight of a ball like you might see some guys do who take larger airs....on a small air like this you'll really only be airborne for a half a second (that's it!) so you'll only have time to bring your knees up a little.

-in the air, just stay loose, bring your knees up just a bit so you can be ready to stomp the landing and keep your eyes where you want to go. For a 4 -5 foot air, you're only going to be in the air for a split second, so you'll just have enough time to bring your feet up a little. Maybe something akin to this:


-on landing, it's important to think about PUSHING your feet into the snow. This is very important. Don't let the snow push your feet and knees up to you, but be aggresive and actively push your feet down into the snow to meet the landing. However, don't reach out with your feet too early as this will cause you to hit the landing too extended which you don't want to do either. But this is how you'll 'stomp' the landing. If you're too passive, and let the snow/ground push up into you...then you'll have a higher chance of getting bucked or thrown off balance. Show that landing who's boss!! Don't let the landing just 'catch you', you're in control!!

-after landing, ski way, hoot and holler, slap high fives, then go back and do it again!....OR head straight to the bar or the internet and rave about the 40 footer you just hit

other than those basics....just relax, have fun, and don't shoot your eye out

Wow..awesome info..I just started doing jumps and now i'm able to go off 6 foot high snow ramps without issues.

I did wipe out on a bigger jump (10ft) high..and it had a 2nd ramp as a downhill landing ..almost like 2 humps in a row....I didn't get enough speed off the first ramp and literally fell into the abyss and smacked into the front of the 2nd ramp...that really hurt

I tried it once more and I was able to clear the "valley" b/w the jumps but when I landed I lost controll....I was looking at some "taking air" videos on ifyouski.com and it said to just go with the flow, and kind of jump off at the end of the ramp...always loook forward..never down as this will throw off your balance and cause you to lean backwards....also keep your arms in front of you so you don't lean back...

I also thought that I was not supposed to 'smack' the landing...it's loud and it hurts if you don't do it right...i thought we are supposed to lean a little back and let the tail touch first, so it softens the impact...boy was I wrong....I'm going to try to do the "stomp" landing in the future...just need to practice more

I really want to build up the courage to do a 10 or 15 foot high jump with high speeds so I can get about 20-30 feet of distance in the jump...what is the best way to achieve this without killing or injuring oneself really badly? Thank you for the tips
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