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Helicoils

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
A local tech mentioned he uses WD-40 as a lubricating agent for installing Helicoils... I have always heard (and used) Elmer's wood glue. Anyone else think this might not be a good idea? I was thinking the agents in the WD 40 might damage the wood core...




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post #2 of 17
Who cares? And no, spraying a bit of WD40 on a piece of wood does not lead to its automagical destruction, though its not what I would use. Using a helicoil in wood is sort of a waste of an insert anyways.

http://www.improvementscatalog.com/h...ir-strips.html
post #3 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
Who cares? And no, spraying a bit of WD40 on a piece of wood does not lead to its automagical destruction, though its not what I would use. Using a helicoil in wood is sort of a waste of an insert anyways.

http://www.improvementscatalog.com/h...ir-strips.html
Hey, those are pretty cool.
post #4 of 17
I would not use WD-40 (Which stands for water displacer formula 40). Why not rub some wax into the threads (any wax), thats seems to be the recommended method to facilitate screwing anything into wood. For skis, it would seem the natural choice.

http://www.woodenboatvb.com/vbulleti...hp/t-6723.html

But I dont see any harm using white glue or wood glue.
post #5 of 17
White glue. It's a great lubricant until it dries. WD40 is totally unnecessary.
post #6 of 17
If you have a Harbor Freight store in the neighborhood, they carry them for a few bucks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
Who cares? And no, spraying a bit of WD40 on a piece of wood does not lead to its automagical destruction, though its not what I would use. Using a helicoil in wood is sort of a waste of an insert anyways.

http://www.improvementscatalog.com/h...ir-strips.html
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
Who cares? And no, spraying a bit of WD40 on a piece of wood does not lead to its automagical destruction, though its not what I would use. Using a helicoil in wood is sort of a waste of an insert anyways.

http://www.improvementscatalog.com/h...ir-strips.html
Pretty sure I've seen steel wool used in the same way.
post #8 of 17
WD40 should not be in your ski (or bike) tool kit. Waterproof wood glue is more than enough but I prefer "Roo-glue" for screws, plugs, and heli-coils.
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by DropCliffsNotBombs View Post
WD40 should not be in your ski (or bike) tool kit.
yes it should be... sticker gunk removal.. stuff sucks as a lube, but is a great solvent
post #10 of 17
Sorry to be obtuse. What exactly is a helicoil. Does it help get you to the top of a slope of untracked powder?
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by TAMSki View Post
Sorry to be obtuse. What exactly is a helicoil. Does it help get you to the top of a slope of untracked powder?
Metal insert (looks like a coil) that restores/replaces a thread where it was stripped.
post #12 of 17
post #13 of 17
Definitely use glue -- it has two purposes: 1) to lubricate the threads going in (normally a minor thing) and 2) seal the core from moisture (especially important with wood core). Basically do it for the same reasons we put a dab of glue in the holes when driving in binding screws. I have used plain white Elmers, but recently switched to waterproof wood glue.
post #14 of 17
Gotta love Alpinord. Just gets right to the point. Often doesn't even use words.

Thanks, Terry!
post #15 of 17
Pasting images is way easier than babbling incoherently with a keyboard....

I've been wondering if anyone has some good comparative insights or opinions on tap in inserts (brass or nylon) versus helicoils to share?
post #16 of 17
Terry, I can speak from a machine shop perspective. Helicoils are great when it makes sense to have a machine thread on the inside and outside of the insert, say when inserting into metals. They are most frequently used to put a durable screw hole in a softer metal, say aluminum, or to repair stripped threads in a variety of metals. They make a lot of sense when space is tight, as the helicoil hole size is not too much larger than the screw size. The typical procedure is to drill and tap a larger hole, thread the helicoil in with a special tool (which threads into the helicoil and hooks the tang at the bottom -- this action "winds" the helicoil to a slightly smaller diameter while going in), then break off the tang (such that you get a through hole). You can place small stakes at the opening of the helicoil to prevent it from backing out, or some people use Devcon or Loctite to glue them in, though that's rare. The same tang effect that makes the helicoil wind smaller when driving in means that it springs back to a larger diameter when the driving tool is removed, thus helping to keep it snug in the hole. I hope that makes sense; when unused, helicoils relax to a large diameter; when driven in by the tang, they wind to a smaller diameter; when released in the hole, they settle in to an intermediate diameter that is snug in the hole.

While I have used helicoils in soft materials (even pine), the act of breaking off the tang can loosen up the repair. And, it's not usually appropriate to put machine-threads in soft materials, such as what is needed to thread a helicoil in. This is where inserts make more sense. You can get inserts with more aggressive wood threads on the outside, and they also can be driven in with a screwdriver from the top -- most inserts have slots at the top. Thus, no need to break off a tang. Inserts can be epoxied in as needed.

I think skis are somewhat of a gray area, since the #12AB thread is already very close to a machine thread and ski topsheets are fairly hard. I think helicoils and inserts can work fine here, but ultimately it would depend on the topsheet material. Certainly, helicoils might be preferred if they result in a more compact repair.

There are also those repair doo-dad anchors that you press into a hole, and they simply add material between the screw and the hole. This is a more fancy way of packing a hole, like some people do with steel or lead wool (or even toothpicks).
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post
Pretty sure I've seen steel wool used in the same way.
We used steel wool and/or wood glue, which also prevents water damage to the core later.
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