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Trying to build a homemade flexion/absorption simulator - Page 4

post #91 of 106
Thread Starter 

Took it up two summer's ago, did a ton of it, ice skating w/figure skates.  It was hugely helpful.  Didn't do it last summer.  

post #92 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

Took it up two summer's ago, did a ton of it, ice skating w/figure skates.  It was hugely helpful.  Didn't do it last summer.  

 

If you can find a hockey/powerskating coach that will help even more. 

post #93 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

However one of my serious weaknesses is getting up off the ground.  I don't jump, I don't naturally make fast, yes explosive, movements when they're needed.  They're needed in bumps.  Maybe not always, but often.

 

 

Not always true. As we get older we gotta go smoother. Timing and technique is key in skiing the the bumps softly - not physicality. 

post #94 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

Helluva I beg to differ.  I do a lot of strength work and cardio work.  The thing that has helped my skiing the most has been doing yoga last summer.

 

However one of my serious weaknesses is getting up off the ground.  I don't jump, I don't naturally make fast, yes explosive, movements when they're needed.  They're needed in bumps.  Maybe not always, but often.

 

One's perspective on what is beneficial and what is less beneficial, often evolves with technical ability.

post #95 of 106
Thread Starter 

Diplomacy never was your strong point was it?

post #96 of 106

...

 

 

post #97 of 106
Thread Starter 

Yes I do disagree, it's not so black and white.  Different people have different needs and different things work for different people.  

 

Yes your ability to know what's best for you gets better as your ability improves.  

 

So does mine.  

 

Your knowledge of what's needed for you is better than your knowledge of what's needed for me.  

 

Not to say that you don't know much that would be good for me, but...

 

I'm me - I know things about me that you don't.

post #98 of 106

...Sorry... deleted the prior post. Don't want to get into it.

post #99 of 106
Heluva has definitely rubbed me the wrong way, too, on a couple of occasions, but I do find myself agreeing with what he says in the last several posts about explosive movements vs. ... not. When I am skiing bumps well, it feels very smooth and flowy, with relatively gradual changes in pressure and resistance as my feet follow the contours. I only "pop" when I want to, and then it's the terrain providing the burst, not my muscles.
post #100 of 106
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Heluva has definitely rubbed me the wrong way, too, on a couple of occasions, but I do find myself agreeing with what he says in the last several posts about explosive movements vs. ... not. When I am skiing bumps well, it feels very smooth and flowy, with relatively gradual changes in pressure and resistance as my feet follow the contours. I only "pop" when I want to, and then it's the terrain providing the burst, not my muscles.

 

Having seen you ski the bumps I think there is more plyometric activity happening than you think - and this exactly because you do have the ability, so it's easy, it doesn't feel explosive to you, but there are definitely powerful movements happening.

 

Feeling glued to the snow all the time is the opposite of that, and that's how I feel, uncomfortable with jumping movements, even basic leapers.

 

Hence my desire to do some things off season that make that a comfortable feeling for me.

post #101 of 106
Have you looked at doing Pilates on a reformer with a jump board attached? I did a lot of this in my ski conditioning Pilates class. It is a great workout. You are lying down but it is a harder workout than I would have thought.
post #102 of 106

<drift>

When my kid was little he went through a long period where he was obsessed with pogo. He got so he could stay bouncing pretty much indefinitely - into the thousands of hops - with no hands

 

 

 

</drift>

post #103 of 106
Thread Starter 

And how does he ski?

post #104 of 106
Thread Starter 

It's like standing in a somewhat narrow stance on skis and balancing over the very center of them, in a changing balance situation.  This develops balance skills similar to the changing balance in skiing.

 

It's moving those skis (the platform you're standing on) around, up and down, managing rebound from them and having to stay centered.

 

So what if it's more intense of a motion than what skiing is?   Like standing in the on-deck circle and swinging a bat with a weight on it.

post #105 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

It's like standing in a somewhat narrow stance on skis and balancing over the very center of them, in a changing balance situation.  This develops balance skills similar to the changing balance in skiing.

 

It's moving those skis (the platform you're standing on) around, up and down, managing rebound from them and having to stay centered.

 

So what if it's more intense of a motion than what skiing is?   Like standing in the on-deck circle and swinging a bat with a weight on it.


 I think it could be decent, maybe not as good as tramp work but decent, crosstraining.  But, nowhere near as good as skating.  Specificity is important.

post #106 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

It's like standing in a somewhat narrow stance on skis and balancing over the very center of them, in a changing balance situation.  This develops balance skills similar to the changing balance in skiing.

 

It's moving those skis (the platform you're standing on) around, up and down, managing rebound from them and having to stay centered.

 

So what if it's more intense of a motion than what skiing is?   Like standing in the on-deck circle and swinging a bat with a weight on it.

 

Try the skier's edge with the powder/mogul platform. One of the very things out there that will simulate a 2-legged release. Work for leg retraction, extension and timing. The platform won't move much unless you have all the pieces timed together.   

 

My son at age 8 can do hundreds of reps (without holding the bar) while a larger person can not move the platform. 

 

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