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How do I pick bindings?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I just picked up a pair of 07 Snoop Daddys, 174 mm. I'm an advanced-intermediate skier, female, 5'8/140lbs, and I have no idea what bindings to put on these bad boys!

What is there to consider? What makes a binding worth the extra $$?
post #2 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by alliek View Post
What makes a binding worth the extra $$?
Personally I like old Salomons, but Look/Rossignol make good bindings, that's what I often hear at least, I had look demos on a pair of skis which I delamed, they served me well.

I think the Look PX bindings are really solid bindings. How about a Look PX10? For your size there is no need for a really high DIN binding.
post #3 of 13
Extra Money = Duke. You know you wanna try it.

Anyway, like the above has said, no need for anything super special with your size and wieght, and the fact that you are FS.
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
Appreciate the input guys
post #5 of 13
The Atomic Neox line is very good. I especially like their "personal positioning" where you can slide the binding forward or aft easily so you are able to center yourself in the ski's sweet spot. Head's Tyrolia Railflex bindings do the same.

Here's more about binding positioning:
http://www.lous.ca/techarticles.htm

With your size, weight, and skiing ability level, the lightest bindings will work fine in the 4-12 DIN range.

If you don't get the response you expect from those skis, they might be too long (and correspondingly too stiff). I'm 6', 200#, good all mountain skier, and I ski 170 cm packed snow skis and 175~178 cm off piste skis.
post #6 of 13
Some DIN 10 Look/Rossignol or Salomon bindings would be good. Here are some nice light Salomons from untracked.com with wide brakes available (get the B90).

http://www.untracked.com/p1284c26b39..._bindings.html
post #7 of 13
I got 07 Sugar Daddys last season with the Atomic FFG 14 binding. They also have a 12 din. These are basically Salomon S914 ti drivers (S912) and are very lightweight and work perfectly with this ski. See if you can get a good price on a pair, and don't forget supporters can obtain discounts at Backcountry and I think Sierra Ski and Snowboard. Well worth it.
post #8 of 13
First we need to know more about you. please post nekkid pics....whoops! Thought I was at TGR.

More $$ = more metal, less plastic.

In addition to features, look also at consistancy and reliability. As noted, the Look/Rossi and Salomon are top contenders. Tyrolia/Fischer are also good and good prices can be found on them as well.
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by alliek View Post
What is there to consider?

things to consider:
-DIN range of the binding (the release scale based on height, weight, boot sole, skier type and age),
-Construction of the binding (light weight or burly)
-Lift (how much leverage the binding has) or no lift
-Cost

What makes a binding worth the extra $$?

high-end bindings cost more because:
-Better Materials used in the binding. A burly binding is durable and transfers energy to the ski better.
-DIN range, if you need higher DIN you're willing to pay for it.
-Advanced Design, more expensive designs usually have much more elastic travel, are much more sensative to impact vs. twisting forces
-They let other skiers know you know what's up.
The most significant difference between a recreational binding and a high performance binding is the improved release/ retention function. A simple two piece heel like a Tyrolia Mojo 11 or a Look Nova is functionally WAY different from a Mojo 15 or a PX series binding. The recreational binding will release whenever enough force is applied (think smacking a mogul), the high performance binding will allow some 'grey area' between release and retention, the elastic travel allows for a sharp impact to start release but if the force is removed the boot will re-center and the ski will stay on (imagine smaking a mogul, then quickly regaining your balnce).

I hope this helps a little.
post #10 of 13
Binding ramp angle is something else to consider. Bud Heishman clued me into this and I am currently revamping my quiver. You can search different threads that will better explain this in detail. Basically, some bindings like Atomic and Tyrolia for example, will have near flat angles, with the heel slightly higher than the toe. Markers and Look Pivots are much higher in the heel. For me flatter is better, but everyone will have their own preferences.
post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
All good info - thanks!

Honestly I'm a pretty schizophrenic skier: I've skied all my life via family vacations in CA and the NW, joined the UW ski team senior year of college, but now live in Arizona with dreams of relocating to Colorado.

So while recreational gear realistically applies, I have uncontrollable delusions of grandeur and crave gear to match!
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by alliek View Post
...I have uncontrollable delusions of grandeur and crave gear to match!
Welcome to the club, Allie.
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post
With your size, weight, and skiing ability level, the lightest bindings will work fine in the 4-12 DIN range.
Alliek - welcome to epicski!

While you do not need a binding with a high DIN range, make sure that you get one that goes low enough for you. Check out the following link:

http://www.skiernet.com/ski-gear-guide.html

... scroll down to the middle of the page, and the table will give you some idea of what your DIN setting is. I'm guessing you're around a 5, so make sure your binding will go that low (most will). Wouldn't hurt to have a little extra room at the "bottom end", so I'd look for a binding that would start at about a 4.
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