or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Best low priced knee support?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
There is a rediculous amount of knee supports out there. I would imagine many of you have tried many of them. I know the best way to go is to get a custom $500+/knee unit. But I dont have that kind of disposable cash right now, and just want something maybe in the $50 region that will help add some knee support and maybe even add a little protection.

Currently I use a medical patella support that I got when I had knee surgery, and on the other leg a simple open patella $35 BIKE brand unit.

The ski store I went to today had one made by Serius and on the package it claimed to offer maximum protection, it had articulated hinges.

Was hoping to find something a bit more substantial. Thanks.
post #2 of 13
I work for a company that makes some of that kind of stuff but it is a small part of our line so I don't claim to be an expert. What are you trying to accomplish, just give general support, keep the patella from tracking?

In general, if your looking support, the hinge is the biggest factor. Look for a hinge that rotates at two different spots rather that just one (FLA is an example of one that has one rotation point). It will be more comfortable for you.
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Hi thanks for responding. Mainly I want to offer some protection to my ligaments. The patella part is just a bonus.
post #4 of 13
Richie,
Check out Aegix wear's Aegix Wing knee support. PM Gear sells their stuff, the Wing is a lycra sleave with a visco-elastic pad on either side, the idea is that the pads slow down the knee's movement as it stretches in a knee ligament destroying fall. By slowing the knee's movement it allows the ligament to stretch like silly putty vs snapping...the owner of Aegix is a Bio-Medical engineer (I think that's what he told me...) anyway it might be what you are looking for. Google Aegix Wing for more info.
post #5 of 13
Something like this may work http://www.orthobionics.net/detail.php/905 To be honest though no over the counter knee brace is really going to give you a whole lot of ligament protection besides that received through properception (you put something on your knee therefore you pay more attention to your knee). I'm not familiar with the Serius one so I can't give you any feedback on that specific brace. I would just find something that is comfortable and know that even prescription bracing can't offer 100% protection for your ligaments and besides a little support no over the counter brace is going to do too much for you.
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks Whiteroom I will look into that.

Thanks Dan, yes I realize this, but I figure a little help is better than nothing. It is a bit of a security blanket, but since I have rather loose knee ligaments (doctor verified), braces help stabilize me a bit.

I really like those Asterisk knee supports but at $550, its a bit steep.
post #7 of 13
Just another thought but if you've seen a dr. for your knees it may be worth it to see if they would write at script for a knee brace for you. Then you could get a better brace and get insurance to pay for it. You probably don't need a custom unless your dimensions are peculiar and a good orthotist could get you in a brace that can do a lot more for you.
post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan5252 View Post
Just another thought but if you've seen a dr. for your knees it may be worth it to see if they would write at script for a knee brace for you. Then you could get a better brace and get insurance to pay for it. You probably don't need a custom unless your dimensions are peculiar and a good orthotist could get you in a brace that can do a lot more for you.
Yeah, that might be a good idea as well. Thanks
post #9 of 13
I'm in your general vicinity and for what it's worth the local 800-lb gorilla health insurer (Oxford - "freedom plan") covered a custom-fitted Townsend brace where the diagnosis was partially torn ACL (http://townsenddesign.com/html/premier_acl.html) .

After determining that diagnosis was incorrect I had ACL surgery. Post-op the surgeon gave me one of these -- http://www.breg.com/products/bracing...L/default.html -- which seems to be an off the shelf product that the doc's office tweaked for proper sizing, positioning etc.

Obviously the custom brace is only a "low priced knee support" if your insurance will cover it. If not, I don't know the pricing on the Breg as an off-the-shelf product but I assume it's lower.

For what it's worth, I think the Breg is actually more comfortable and feels more durable and supportive. It has the double-hinge that was mentioned above.
post #10 of 13
There isn't really a difference in quality between custom bracing and an off the shelf brace. If you fit into the dimensions for an off the shelf it will perform about the same as a custom. A good quality ACL, PCL or compete instabilities brace is going to cost the dealer $200-$300 normally. It varies from there on what they charge to fit it and sell it to you. Both the braces mentioned above are pretty good braces. There are others that are very good also. If you go to a Dr. they probably will have a preference and you won't have to worry too much about picking out the right one. The important thing is that it is comfortable and low profile enough you can wear it when you ski.
post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01 View Post
I'm in your general vicinity and for what it's worth the local 800-lb gorilla health insurer (Oxford - "freedom plan") covered a custom-fitted Townsend brace where the diagnosis was partially torn ACL (http://townsenddesign.com/html/premier_acl.html) .

After determining that diagnosis was incorrect I had ACL surgery. Post-op the surgeon gave me one of these -- http://www.breg.com/products/bracing...L/default.html -- which seems to be an off the shelf product that the doc's office tweaked for proper sizing, positioning etc.

Obviously the custom brace is only a "low priced knee support" if your insurance will cover it. If not, I don't know the pricing on the Breg as an off-the-shelf product but I assume it's lower.

For what it's worth, I think the Breg is actually more comfortable and feels more durable and supportive. It has the double-hinge that was mentioned above.
Those are some awesome looking braces. I am going to try and see what I can do. It just so happens that the same insurance I have.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
It just so happens that the same insurance I have.
Not surprised ... 800 lb. gorilla etc. Probably depends on your diagnosis, I'm sure your doc will know the ins and outs. Good luck.
post #13 of 13
FWIW, Ive used quite a few different braces. The neoprene cuffs don't offer much additional support. They usually start to smell bad, even if you wash them. They also tend to slide down (with the taper of your quad),
or rotate to either side.

The neoprene cuffs with medial and lateral stays are a little better. They are primarily for medial and lateral instability (MCL and LCL). If there is an extension stop, usually indicated with degrees on the protractor device on the side(s) of the hinged stays, it will limit some of the hyperextension/anterior-lateral translation of the tibia (ACL). These are a little better. Still have the smell and shifting problems.

My favorite braces are the Bledsoe and Don-Joy type that have semi-circular stays across the quad and calf muscles. These are the most stable, designed for ACL stability, or can be customized. I'm really concentrating, and the only complaints I can recall about these braces is the price.

As far as who to go to about these braces, either a decent PT or someone who specializes in sports type bracing. Usually the Doc's I work with, defer this to me (PT).
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav: