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Canting, the correct way?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Since this season I hope to finalize my boot issues, I want to be well educated when I speak to whoever it is that I finally trust the work with. The more I know the better I will be at expressing my issues.

I realize this off-season that I need some canting work. When skiing with flat skis, I must forcefully tilt my ankles to keep them flat and not catching an edge, I thought it might be due to shaped skis, but from what I have read they should be more stable at slow speeds than they are and without so much input from me.

What is the best way to measure your leg alignment? I read an article that said there is only one way: http://www.howtoski.net/sub_boots4.htm

Additionally, the person who has designed the knee-saver bindings, states that correcting cant by grinding the bases of the boots is not the way to go, and that by doing so renders bindings less effective. To be honest grinding the base of a boot never sat well with me being that they are DIN sized and altering them would mean altering the way they fit in the binding. It would seem to me the correct way to go about the whole canting would be to shim the boots from the inside, or shim the actual bindings (which I would rather not do so that I don't have to keep a left and a right ski.)

I also would like to know if with my racing skis, my boots should be adjusted for me while in a tuck, since my feet probably lays differently when standing up staright than when in a squat.

Again, your expertise is greatly appreciated.
post #2 of 12
I would suggest this. There have been many different philosophies about "canting" I would suggest that you understand them and look at the different ideas as options. Once you begin to understand what you need consider all the options. Don't get forced into anything, you are the best expert for your feet.

With that being said I would say that most don't know about internal canting which is what my company does. YOu should consider this as well as knee assessments. Just because your knees look good does not mean you are in your perfect place.

And once you get on snow you should test yourself on a flat surface and do a one footed straight run down the fall line. if you can go straight without working for it you are in the zone. If you cant there is room for improvemet.
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thank you Mosh! This is what I was hoping to read.

Any east coast recommendations that wont require me to get a second mortgage? Thanks again.
post #4 of 12
Richie-Rich,

Have you considered a ski trip for this season yet? Perhaps January 20-24th in Aspen for ESA?

Mosh and myself will be there doing a boot camp in conjunction with the Epic Ski Academy camp. This is a great opportunity to do it right! You will be assessed indoors by Mosh and myself which will include checking your ranges of motion in the foot and ankle, looking at morphology, testing dynamic balance with the SBS system as well as checking your external alignment. We will do on hill skiing tests before and after making final adjustments to your boots. Modifications include planing soles and applying internal SBS shims to get you in the optimal position both laterally and fore/aft, optimizing your balancing abilities and your edge engagement. This is in my opinion the best way to tackle alignment issues and improve your skiing abilities and enjoyment immeadiately.

Take away the impediments to progress!

Then the next four days ski with some of the best coaches in the Country to take your new found balance to the next level in your skiing. By the time you leave for home you will have felt some great new sensations in your skiing, made new friends, and skied like you never knew you could before!

Come and join us!
bud
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for extending the invitation Bud, that would be a dream come true, especially since I have never skiied out west. This was going to be the year I saw some big mountains, but I found and bought my first house so it does not look to be possible for me this season. I already have my "big" trip booked with the family for Stratton VT so that pretty much swallows up most of the ski trip funds.
post #6 of 12
I might in Vermont at some point this season, if that is doable for you to get to on a mid week day. I deal with the SBS system and could bring shims with me and we can see what helps.
post #7 of 12
Hey, congratulations on the first house! That's a smarter choice than a ski trip!

PJDewey, Look him up in VT I think? racestocksports.com
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDoyal View Post
I might in Vermont at some point this season, if that is doable for you to get to on a mid week day. I deal with the SBS system and could bring shims with me and we can see what helps.
During the week very unlikely, but thank you.
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
Hey, congratulations on the first house! That's a smarter choice than a ski trip!

PJDewey, Look him up in VT I think? racestocksports.com
Thanks and thanks!
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Additionally, the person who has designed the knee-saver bindings, states that correcting cant by grinding the bases of the boots is not the way to go, and that by doing so renders bindings less effective. To be honest grinding the base of a boot never sat well with me being that they are DIN sized and altering them would mean altering the way they fit in the binding. It would seem to me the correct way to go about the whole canting would be to shim the boots from the inside, or shim the actual bindings (which I would rather not do so that I don't have to keep a left and a right ski.)
Congrats on the house.

Before you discount any "process" for canting as wrong, or bad, in my experience there is no "ONE WAY" or "RIGHT WAY" to adjust the cant and alignment for everyone. While changing the shape of the boot lugs is something you want to avoid because it will affect the way a boot releases from the binding, Grinding the bottoms of the boots can be done, then add lifters to supply more material. Then you can cut off or machine away the material off the top of the lugs to make them meet the DIN standard. All of the boot balancer's I know of use this process or a similar process. Many racers just add lift to get better leverage on their skis and then cut away the tops of the lugs to make them meet the DIN standard.

If anyone (even me) tells you that there is only one way to do something, RUN the other way.

One thing I will tell you, the lifters they use are way more slippery than the original bottom of your boot. This gives you better anti friction and should make the binding perform even better. For some canting inside the boot makes sense, for some canting outside does. Some people have one short leg and might require a lift that you can not do internally.

I'm just trying to point out that you need to keep an open mind.

DC
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks DC, yesterday Whiteroom taught me this via PM, I had little prior knowledge as to just how this was all accomplished. Now it makes more sense and seems like a viable option.
post #12 of 12
philosophy de jure
In life, all things are true, but no one single thing is the truth
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