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Newb set up question

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
I have an opportunity to do some outreach to a young boy who has had a lot of adjustment in the past 6-8 months. He has moved to Michigan from Kentucky and is showing an interest in Snowboarding when we get snow, and I can get him in the deal to ski with my school group with a cheap lift ticket, but the rental snow boards they have for this program are really not ..........hmmmmm, (trying to say it delicately)............How do they learn on this crap equipment?


Any way..........if there is a possibility to get this kid his own gear at a reasonable price, I'd love to do that for him. My theory is, that if we get him used gear, even if its not great, then we can at least put our efforts into it and start him out on a board that has a decent tune.
He's 11
105 lbs
5'1" ish
Size 10 1/2 shoe:

I'm guessing he's going to go through a growth spurt before ski season hits us.
Suggestions?
post #2 of 28
We had a good answer in the Beginner Zone regarding initial setups but it was deleted by those that wanted you to go to an instructor for advice and disrupt a lesson . The Rusty has some great advice on this subject
post #3 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
We had a good answer in the Beginner Zone regarding initial setups but it was deleted by those that wanted you to go to an instructor for advice and disrupt a lesson . The Rusty has some great advice on this subject
WHAT!?
post #4 of 28
Several thoughts:

1) Last season, at the beginning of the season, Winter Park cleared out all of it's old children's rental equipment. It wasn't bad equipment, they just went to a new system. They gave all the equipment away for free. Instructors had first dibs. There are enough instructors on this board, perhaps we could ask our resorts? Maybe calling local rental shops too. There are certainly plenty of those here in the Front Range.

2) Ski & Snowboard swaps. I know Boulder has several annually and Winter Park is having theirs Oct 12 - 14th. http://www.skiwinterpark.com/competition/news/index.htm

3) Craigslist - I've seen several on the free section asking for free children's equipment.

4) Snowboard Outreach - can they help?

5) I've got a similar situation. There are some underpriviledged hispanic kids in my neighborhood. They've seen my snowboards and they want to learn. I've offered to teach for free but I need help with tickets, rentals, and clothes. My boards are too big for them. I see this as a way to keep them active in the winter and away from those stupid gangs which they are now getting drawn towards. Better to learn snowboarding than start spray painting graffitti in the neighborhood. Their parents are all working two jobs and the kids stay home unsupervised after school.

6) Sports Authority - they are having SNIAGRAB right now here in the Front Range. Maybe they could donate what they can't sell and still get the tax write-off.
post #5 of 28
10.5 shoe??/What is he, a Hobbit?
post #6 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
10.5 shoe??/What is he, a Hobbit?
Exactly!
I am wondering if this kid is going to be a giant!
The problem I see is the size board he needs for his height and weight will not accommodate the waist he needs to eliminate toe drag with those feet!
post #7 of 28
Go with waist width over length. Get a longer board if necessary to accommodate his feet. It's more important to avoid boot drag.
post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
We had a good answer in the Beginner Zone regarding initial setups but it was deleted by those that wanted you to go to an instructor for advice and disrupt a lesson . The Rusty has some great advice on this subject
I do? I hope you saved it somewhere! Did I send it to you on PM?
post #9 of 28
It was a stance set up question not a set up of equipment. My mistake
That you would probably remember.
post #10 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Go with waist width over length. Get a longer board if necessary to accommodate his feet. It's more important to avoid boot drag.
Rod, do you have any suggestions on a board?
post #11 of 28
No. I defer to the rusty. He has the great advice. Size 10 1/2 boots don't require a really wide board. A rockered boot and/or lift from binding allow some overhang without drag. Maybe 25.5mm waist, depending on stance angles. Something wide enough and not too long and not too stiff. Definitely have the boot hang over a little bit, heel and toe.

More important to have good boots and bindings. He will grow into a board that is a little long for him now.
post #12 of 28
trekchick, you know, I work in a small, very niche-y shop. I really don't want to give REI anything, but...

http://www.rei.com/category/4501649

Having said that. He does have very big feet for someone 5"1', and 11 years old (watch out ladies). But, 10.5 isn't that big. He really could handle most normal boards.

Jibbers are my size, with his size feet, and ride tiny little boards all the time.

And, buy him a basketball.
post #13 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by splitter View Post
trekchick, you know, I work in a small, very niche-y shop. I really don't want to give REI anything, but...

http://www.rei.com/category/4501649

Having said that. He does have very big feet for someone 5"1', and 11 years old (watch out ladies). But, 10.5 isn't that big. He really could handle most normal boards.

Jibbers are my size, with his size feet, and ride tiny little boards all the time.

And, buy him a basketball.
Splitter, as usual, you crack me up!

Rod, thank you for your honesty, but therusty seems to be ignoring me.
Maybe a good whack with my ski pole will do the trick

So, I'm guessing something in the mid 150's in length?
post #14 of 28

Ouch, that hurt!

I am not a gear guy.

Nice REI page, but prices are not all that amazing. Trek, start online shopping at my where to buy page. But your cheapest/safest stuff is to be found at your local swaps. I'm thinking that whatever you get won't matter much because it will be the wrong size by midnight. If the board you get is a little to narrow waisted, just set him with higher stance angles or invest in lifters.

I hate to say this, but for kids with that much potential, one ought to do a serious evaluation of a pro sports career before taking up a snow sports hobby. There's not MUCH sense taking up a hobby they'll have to quit soon. The other thing I'd be worried about is coordination during growth spurts. I may be over reacting, but I'd least have a discussion with the kid so that he's conscious of the issue. I'd hate to see someone try to pull off their first 360 when they're an inch taller than the week before.
post #15 of 28
theRusty, sorry if I put you on the spot, but I knew you would have some good advice. I agree that the specific model of board is not important and the fact that he will outgrow his gear quickly. Seasonal rental? If such a thing exists. Or second hand gear that some other kid has outgrown before wearing out.

Do big feet really equal a potential career in sports? I wouldn't worry about a conflict of interest between snowboarding and basketball at this point. My nephews were involved with basketball which is why they didn't have time to learn skiing, but that is a choice they made. It wasn't because they weren't allowed to ski, it was because they had practices and games on the weekends.
post #16 of 28
No worries Rod!

Feet that big on a frame that small at that age? That's a recipe for growing into a pro at something body. Sure thing? Of course not. If you're thinking about possibly playing a pro sport where wrist usage occurs, why even take the risk of learning to ride? Granted for most kids, the possibility is remote. But for this kid, it should be something to consider.

In high school, there's no problem doing winter sports other than the time aspect. In college and the pros, you've got to be special to be allowed to ski or ride (e.g. Bloom). That said, this is equal justification for participating in snow sports while you still can (in case things turn out well) or getting an early start (in case pro sports is not in the cards).

All I'm saying is that it's something extra to think about and discuss.
post #17 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
theRusty, sorry if I put you on the spot, but I knew you would have some good advice. I agree that the specific model of board is not important and the fact that he will outgrow his gear quickly. Seasonal rental? If such a thing exists. Or second hand gear that some other kid has outgrown before wearing out.

Do big feet really equal a potential career in sports? I wouldn't worry about a conflict of interest between snowboarding and basketball at this point. My nephews were involved with basketball which is why they didn't have time to learn skiing, but that is a choice they made. It wasn't because they weren't allowed to ski, it was because they had practices and games on the weekends.
Second hand gear is the direction I am heading. Unless I can get a killer deal. You know me, I may just find a killer deal!
post #18 of 28
Maybe he could do the lease arrangement . They let you exchange as your size or needs change and the prices I have seem are very reasonable. This is an affordable option for a growing child.
I was going to do this for my then 13 year old but I invested in his stuff since he seems to be slowing his growth these days . As an eleven year old that could have a few growth spurts coming at any time I wouldn't hesitate to lease for him to see how it goes.
post #19 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
Maybe he could do the lease arrangement . They let you exchange as your size or needs change and the prices I have seem are very reasonable. This is an affordable option for a growing child.
I was going to do this for my then 13 year old but I invested in his stuff since he seems to be slowing his growth these days . As an eleven year old that could have a few growth spurts coming at any time I wouldn't hesitate to lease for him to see how it goes.
keeping all options open. Thanks for the idea Garry, but for now I don't see this an an option in our area.

Because his feet are probably where they are going to be(lets hope so) I think we'll be safe to buy boots and bindings. We just may need to get a used board and then up grade that when need be.
post #20 of 28
Thread Starter 
I checked out the $99 snowboard sale at SierraSnowboard and snatched up a great deal for this kid. I am sure my nephews old bindings are going to work for him, and then all he'll need is boots and lessons.

Thanks to Sierra Jim once again for hooking me up with a deal!!!
post #21 of 28

Are we really...

Talking about making an 11 year old a pro athlete because he has big feet. Lets keep it all in perspective here folks...

the Odds of making it to the pro's are slim at best. Prior to age 13, kids do not have a well enough developed sense of winning and losing to be forced into any competitive environment. Kids who specialize at too young of an age almost always suffer. If the kid has an interest in snowsports, or anything else, nurture that interest. I would venture to say that there are very few on this board who are unhappy to have been exposed to skiing (riding) rather than to have been forced into traditional team sports.

besides...Why couldn't he become a pro rider? If he has the coordination and stregnth to succeed in sport, he certainly can develop the skill in many others. Good athletes are just that...Good athletes.
post #22 of 28
SirMack,

An exceptionally valid point. There are no guarantees in life. There is one known fact. The kid is already exceptional. He does not have big feet. He has huge feet. Although the odds are slim, the potential monetary payoff is huge (even for pro riding, although the odds of an extraordinary income are a lot smaller). The main point here is that he is old enough for a discussion about his potential and where he wants to take his life. It's not smart parenting to put this kid on a board simply because it would be a fun activity. It is smart parenting to have the discussion first and then let the kid decide.

For many pro sports, 11 is not too early to start preparing for a pro career. If he goes through the growth spurt that he is set up to take, he's likely going to feel pretty awkward and lack some confidence about his future. Even if he just takes up riding, those big feet are going to cause some problems over the next few years. Riding could (and probably would)turn out to be a wonderful aid to dealing with those problems. Riding could also help make a bad situation worse. "The discussion" is not just about a potential career down the long road, but also about difficulties that are likely going to be just around the corner.

Let's look at a few hypothetical examples. I may be wrong here - I'm doing this for my education. Let's say a healthy wrist is a key factor in a successful basketball player. If my interest was basketball, I'd probably want to be a little more religious about wearing wrist guards while riding. Let's say that knee injuries while riding are more likely from landing big airs than from free riding. If that's true that could impact my choices on the slopes. Let's say that deep in my heart I want to be a pro football player and I want to do everything to maximize my chances of a successful career. In this case riding now could either be a smart mental health move or a career ending mistake. There are studies out showing that taller people are more successful professionally in any career and that nutrition can impact full grown height. Most 11 year olds are making enough food choices to impact their diet. Most 11 year olds are not very educated about nutrition. Food options are limited at many resorts. A riding hobby could be the start of a brown bagging nutritional adventure, a harmless fun dining diversion or the beginning of a growth altering diet habit.

For most kids, this would not be a big deal. For this kid, it's probably not a big deal. But my experience in life is that when opportunity knocks on the door, it's pretty smart to open the door and have a chat and think about it.
post #23 of 28
Thread Starter 
This kid has shown interest in four things:
Skateboarding
Dirtbiking
Orchestra(bass)
Snowboarding

I doubt he'll be a pro athlete, but I do think he's going to do something profound that will make a lasting impression on the world!

In the mean time, we'll get him set up for some fun on the snow!
post #24 of 28
Trakchick -

Hopefully there was input above to get him gear....and sorry for the threadjack. but here goes...

Rusty -

While I agree with you that age 11 is not always to early to begin preparing for pro sports, in our current model, that does not necessarily make it right. The average gymnastics career is over by 20 and peaks at 16, Thus by 11 you had best be well on your way. However, for each Michelle Wie (or pick any other successful child athlete...we can argue about successful later) there are countless children who have grown up and come to hate a sport because of the pressures placed on children to succeed. Burn out is one of the most commonly cited reasons for quitting a sport. This pressure can be either real, or percieved. Your average 11 year will more than likely interpret the conversation of concern for the furure as this is what mom and dad want me to do. In short, The dream for success at anything has be driven by internal forces, not external. If the Kid has dreams of a sports career it can be fostered, But parents and the child need to remember that it is the child's dream, not the parent's.

It may sound like I am advocating a laissez faire style of parenting, letting the child act on his own, regardless of whether it is in his own self interests. That is not the case. I believe that children should be educated in their decisions, and protected from harm, but also that they are children and should be allowed to enjoy that special part of life (and extend it into adulthood through snowboarding)
post #25 of 28
Thread Starter 
I'm never upset about a thread hijack.
Carry on!


Now back to the kid in question.
I got a deal on a board from SierraSnowboard,as stated above.
The board is wide enough to accommodate his feet, but its as tall as he is.
How big of a problem is this going to be?
post #26 of 28
He may be too fast to keep up with!

A "too long" board will be more difficult to make short turns with and make it more difficult to maneuver for tricks in the park and pipe.
post #27 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
He may be too fast to keep up with!

A "too long" board will be more difficult to make short turns with and make it more difficult to maneuver for tricks in the park and pipe.
I'm really hoping he has a growth spurt.
the board is 155, so its not too long for an average teen.
We may have to do something different for his beginnings, then move to this board after he grasps the basics. Thoughts?

Still wonder how to accommodate his big feet on a shorter board, which will be narrower if it stands to reason the way I think.
post #28 of 28
The 155 should be fine.
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