EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › base burn, Atomics, and man made snow
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

base burn, Atomics, and man made snow - Page 2

post #31 of 43
For someone who waxes their skis for the protection aspect more than performance, is there any advantage to LF3 over CH3?

fwiw, this is my first season with my own skis (and obviously waxing on my own), and I'll be using Dominator Zoom graphite on Nordica SUV 12.1 skis. The large majority of the snow at my local ski areas is man-made, so I'm concerned that I'll need something extra to prevent base burn.
post #32 of 43
For the recreational skier, there isn't much advantage to using fluoro waxes, other than better glide on wet, warm days. Stick with an appropriate hydrocarbon wax and wax often.
post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick29 View Post
For someone who waxes their skis for the protection aspect more than performance, is there any advantage to LF3 over CH3? .
Lubrication.

Using the "rug burn" analogy one more time, it's like putting butter on your knees before you go skidding.

No one has mentioned oldie but goodie graphite yet, as in LFG4, it's not just for static electricity anymore.
post #34 of 43
Flourocarbons are actually WORSE for base health... Most prep waxes are hydrocarbons. Flouros tend to dry the base out.
post #35 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
Are you brushing the base with a brass brush before you wax each time? Once you have base burn, you have to use a brush that will remove all of those tiny little hairs and restore the smoothness to the base.
Lots of good info in this thread.

What about using spray Swix Base Cleaner? No one has mentioned that stuff yet. Should I clean burned skis with base cleaner, use the brush, then layer on all the hot waxes? In my case, there's no wearing away of the base next to the metal edges. Good and smooth there, so I assume no need for a base grind. Just light gray where it should be black.
post #36 of 43
I could be wrong, but i don't think there's any need for that base cleaner stuff. Ialways figured it's more for the Nords getting thier klister and stuff off.
post #37 of 43
If used wrong base cleaner will do more harm than good. It is often alcohol based, so it will really dry the bases out if you aren't careful. A good hot scrape should clean your bases well enough for your purposes.
post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
If used wrong base cleaner will do more harm than good. It is often alcohol based, so it will really dry the bases out if you aren't careful.
Is that really a satisfactory explanation?

The guy at RiteAid sells me 70% ethyl and 90% isopropyl rubbing alcohol in polyethylene bottles with waxed paper seals under the tops.

How come those don't "dry" out?
post #39 of 43
Another hot-scrape / base-cleaner debate?
Thi should get interesting.
:
post #40 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by quickk9 View Post
Another hot-scrape / base-cleaner debate?
No. Don't bring knee jerk controversy into this.

I'd like to know the answer.
post #41 of 43
My last comment was sarcasm, but don't take this one to be:
You may want to do a search under the tuning/maintenance section for "base cleaners" or "hot scraping." Much has been written about the pros and cons of each method. There are those who use base cleaners and those who don't. When I first started tuning, I used base cleaner, but I now stick with hot scraping with new skis and after having skis ground. The hot scraping seems to pull out dirt that has been ground into the bases from either skiing or grinding. I do as many passes as necessary until the wax scrapes off clean.
I have never heard anyone say that hot scraping could damage bases (and it shouldn't since bases are supposed to have wax applied) so I follow that method. The base cleaner is a solvent and although I don't know it's exact chemical makeup, I could see how a solvent could be harmful to plastic - polyethylene in this case.
Does base cleaner work as well or better? I don't know.
I suppose what I should do is take a couple of skis that I pulled out of the trash and use base cleaner on one and hotscrape the other. Then I could swap methods and see which removed more dirt. It wouldn't answer the drying out question, but it would allow a comparison of which removed more dirt.
To me, the topic of base cleaning is like talking to your significant other about your previous partners. It may be insightful and interesting at first, but it inevitably turns ugly and rarely has a happy ending.
post #42 of 43
I don't think either one is bad for the base, my simplistic view on this is solvents draw out wax/dirt and leave behind air in the base voids that held the wax. Hot wax exchanges old wax/dirt for new wax without leaving voids.

Regardless of my opinion or thoughts, at the SIA ski & snowboard trade show I once asked all the tech guys for the major ski companies what they recommended. They all said hot-wax scraping.

If this is important then hot-wax scrape; if ease and convenience and time is more important, use solvents/cleaners.
post #43 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor D View Post
I don't think either one is bad for the base, my simplistic view on this is solvents draw out wax/dirt and leave behind air in the base voids that held the wax. Hot wax exchanges old wax/dirt for new wax without leaving voids.
Hmm. Ultrasonic baseplates as the next big thing in waxing irons, I like it.

Ebay should have cheap shoji massagers, right?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › base burn, Atomics, and man made snow