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Ahh Ha! That's what they were talking about!

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Have you ever struggled to get something during instruction, and later, when you are doing something completely unrelated have an "ah ha!" moment?

Mine:
Looking ahead!
I finally figured out that my biggest struggle when I started to ski bumps is looking ahead. When I'm cruising, not a problem. When I'm in the trees, not a problem, but when I get into bumps I start to over think, look down, reach back and just lose it!
At ESA Jeb Said, "Look Ahead"
Weems said, "pick someone you trust and follow them"

At bumpphest, I was fatigued after a couple of solid days of spring skiing, but I did it, tired legs and all. The bumps at Kton were unlike anything I'd ever seen:. I sucked, but when Phil or Paul said follow me, I did better,(not great just better). I wasn't looking at the bumps, I was looking at the back of Phil or Paul.

Where the Ah Ha! comes in............
Mt biking. The one thing I know when I'm in the tight trees is, Don't look at the tree, look at your trail target. While riding last weekend, I said "AH HA! I get through the trees because I am not looking at them but past them!!!"

Same with bumps. When I looked at the back of a leader, I was looking past the bumps so they weren't an obstacle!


What's your Ah Ha Moment!?
post #2 of 15
Nice thread.

A number of years ago my sweetie and i were hiking in Alberta. the couple we were hiking with, an amazing park ranger/theater major couple, offered some tips on going down a fairly steep, slippery, gravelly trail. She said the tendency is to lean back as you are going down hill, but then you don't get good traction on the full length of the soles of your shoes and you risk having your feet slip out from under you and landing on your butt. instead, she said, "lean forward, try to keep your body perpendicular to the slope of the trail and you'll have better traction." Hmmm, i thought, I've heard something like that before! I knew it skiing intellectually, but after trying it on the hiking trail and truly feeling what a difference it made in my ability to not slip on the trail, i was able to translate it to my skiing with a lot more confidence and purpose.
post #3 of 15
I seem to have most of my "ahh ha" moments in the summer after I "think my skiing to death" for five or six months straight. This year I had two, and they came in April and May:
  1. The first had to do with the orientation of my hips to the snow.
  2. The second had to do with using flexion in transitions.
I expect a dramatic change in my skiing this year as a result of those revelations. This will probably be the biggest change my skiing has experienced since I learned what balancing was.

Later

GREG
post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
I seem to have most of my "ahh ha" moments in the summer after I "think my skiing to death" for five or six months straight. This year I had two, and they came in April and May:
  1. The first had to do with the orientation of my hips to the snow.
  2. The second had to do with using flexion in transitions.
I expect a dramatic change in my skiing this year as a result of those revelations. This will probably be the biggest change my skiing has experienced since I learned what balancing was.

Later

GREG
So that we may learn from you,: can you give examples of #1 and #2
post #5 of 15


T
post #6 of 15
I will pass along my wifes which she she received from Okemos Womans Alpine Adventure program...She always thought that the "Skier Responsibility Code" that said "Ski in Control" meant to ski slow...but Tcarey explained that you just need to "Ski in Balance"..for if you are skiing in balance..you are skiing in control! AH-HA!!!!! The light went off err on for her and her skiing rapidly jumped a level. Thanks WAA-WAA!
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkevenson View Post
So that we may learn from you,: can you give examples of #1 and #2
  1. My skiing was critiqued by a coach, who had previously been trying to 'lead' me to leveling my hips (especially at the apex of the turn), but finally just came out and said look at your hips compared to this - and showed me several examples of skiers/racers in a much stronger position. What this will effectively do is allow me to use the sidecut of the ski much more than I was previously (no longer grinding on the sidecut, but allowing it to slice through the snow/ice). This also allows for higher edge angles if needed - along with a whole bunch of lateral balance related factors.
  2. Flexion in transition was an interesting one for me. There is a lot of grey area surrounding transition types, and how/when they should be used. Some will always say "flex to release", others will say that is limiting, others will promote cross overs, cross unders, cross throughs, ILE, OLR, simultaneous edge changes, etc... the list goes on. It was proposed to me that all good have some component of flexion (and extension into the new turn) to them - even a good cross over - which is commonly mistaken for an up/unweight move. So my goal is to incorporate more useful (dynamic) flexion and extension in my skiing this season. You won't be seeing my knees touch my chin in transition, but there will certainly be a more dynamic, versatile element.
Later

GREG
post #8 of 15
Strong neutral baby! Woo-hoo!

Maybe it shares something with the sort of "balance" that springboard divers experience? (Thanks to Ghost.)
post #9 of 15
My big "ah, ha" was getting what Archmeister so well labeled allowing things to happen rather than trying to make them happen. I didn't get it from him, but he provided the word that's just so apt.
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
  1. My skiing was critiqued by a coach, who had previously been trying to 'lead' me to leveling my hips (especially at the apex of the turn), but finally just came out and said look at your hips compared to this - and showed me several examples of skiers/racers in a much stronger position. What this will effectively do is allow me to use the sidecut of the ski much more than I was previously (no longer grinding on the sidecut, but allowing it to slice through the snow/ice). This also allows for higher edge angles if needed - along with a whole bunch of lateral balance related factors.
Later

GREG
Are you talking about more counterbalance (angulation) and less "banking"?
post #11 of 15
A while back, I had an ah-ha that was just a leap of faith. Getting on some ultra-carvers and allowing myself to "get upside down" the skis were there to get me on the other side.
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashski View Post
Are you talking about more counterbalance (angulation) and less "banking"?
Ashski,
Yes, in a sense I guess that is what you would consider it... but the interesting thing is that In my skiing I already use a fair amount of counter balance (very little true banking), but it originated from the shoulders, not the hips. Done correctly, counteracting movements (my current understanding anyway) should originate at the hips and not the shoulders. I was obviously already well aware of what counterbalance, angulation, and banking all were - and was getting my shoulders fairly level, but not my hips. The hips factor was the "ah ha" moment for me. We probably both know of the coach who suggested this change...
Later
GREG
post #13 of 15
Just for clarity,
Angulation = counter balancing = tipping the upper body outward for balance and more edging. Here's an excellent training device: The Ski Coach

Counter = counter acting = turning the upper body from the hips & shoulders toward the outside of the turn like Eric Schlopy. This helps hold the ski tails' grip and allows the front abdominal muscles to assist with angulation/counter balancing. (I am not a "ski into the counter" believer. The earlier the counter the better, and the steeper the slope the more counter and earlier counter needed, IMO. I'm also a strong disbeliever in the old saying of having the inside foot lead dependent on the slope of the hill--more lead on steeper hills--and that the angle across the ankles equals the angle across the hips equals the angle across the shoulders. I believe it's best to keep the inside foot as far back as possible for better edging ability and better fore/aft balance.)

My most recent ah-ha moment....
Moguls have always been a...challenge...for me. I was skiing with an ex-freestyle competitor who made these suggestions that resonated with me and made mogul skiing fun for me. (1) Have the ski pole ready to plant before your skis reach the fall line. (2) Never allow the ski pole and outside arm to get past the fall line. This prevents my old habits of leaning back toward the hill and wrapping my outside arm too far around the body. Having the pole ready to plant in this way allows a quick pole plant on any mogul crest that looks good.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally posted by HeluvaSkier

Ashski,
Yes, in a sense I guess that is what you would consider it... but the interesting thing is that In my skiing I already use a fair amount of counter balance (very little true banking), but it originated from the shoulders, not the hips. Done correctly, counteracting movements (my current understanding anyway) should originate at the hips and not the shoulders. I was obviously already well aware of what counterbalance, angulation, and banking all were - and was getting my shoulders fairly level, but not my hips. The hips factor was the "ah ha" moment for me. We probably both know of the coach who suggested this change...

Later

GREG

Is this what you mean?

I found these images helpful.

Do I need to remove his head from the images.....

[quote]
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashski View Post
Is this what you mean?

I found these images helpful.

Do I need to remove his head from the images.....

Yes, it was something like that...

Man... you guys don't miss a beat do you?
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