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Reluctance in Powder?!

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hi Pro's - a really great resource, thankyou in advance.

Problem/Question etc. I have a reluctance to ski fast/fast enough and without worry in powder.

Background. 65yrs, skiing since 32yrs old, raced for 20 yrs, old independent leg (Stenmark era) skier. Have been making transition to new techniques now for 7-8 years. I am hesitant in powder and often turn too much. Have actually turned so much I fell over backwards with my back down the hill. Been trying now for 2 years at getting more off piste into the trees etc. I don't know how to actually perfectly describe my reluctance and I am sure a lot of it is mental (yep I have been accused of being a mental at different times during my life).

I consider myself an advanced skier and can ski moguls, steeps, trees, crud etc. with ok precision. Since I became aware of the "ask a pro" forum here on Epic I thought I would ask.

Me. 65 yrs, good condition, 190, 5'11" General Groomer Ski's Fischer RC4 170cm, off piste K2 Apache Outlaws 174, Boots Nordica Speedmachine 10's. Have been an instuctor for 5 years L1, just teach partime at Silver Mt. Idaho.

As I have stated I do have some reluctance in powder but I still look forward to getting in and practicing/experiencing etc. My age has slowed me down a little, i.e., don;t ski real steep stuff when icy and don't huck cliffs at all. Still like to go fast, enjoy challenges etc.

I read a lot of skiing stuff on Epic and for example read recently every comment on skiing on 2 skis etc. I really don't think it is one thing thats holding me back but rather a hangup in confidence. However if I really knew what I was talking about I wouldn't be here asking the question. Any help you can send my way would/will be appreciated. thanks Pete
post #2 of 12
Hi Pete--

No, I don't think it's just one thing either, with all your experience in so many conditions. I suspect your techniical skills are well up to the challenge of powder. In fact, real powder--that rare, untracked, marshmallow covering of deep or bottomless snow--is really one of the easiest conditions to ski. It can make technically poor skiers look, and feel, like heros. So I'm sure you can do it too!

What is likely is simply that you lack the mileage in powder that will enable you to relax and ski the way you're capable of skiing. Powder--especially deep powder--is a very different environment than most other conditions. It looks different--and you may not be able to see your skis, which can be disconcerting until you get used to it. (Trust me--they're still down there--and you'd know it right away if they weren't!)

More importantly, it feels different. All the sensations that you've learned to expect and react to, that give your body the feedback it needs to perform with skill and polish, and that tell you you're in control, feel different. You don't ski on your edges--you ski on the bottom of your feet, no matter how much your skis are tipped. You float in the the snow, not on it. When you extend your legs, you don't get taller--your feet move lower. There's nothing to "push off" from, and when you start to sense a loss of balance, there's nothing to brace yourself against, or to push on with your feet or poles to recover. And there's no sound--no grating of your edges, or thumping on bumps. Sensations and sounds are all more subtle--it may feel like you're in a sensory deprivation chamber. Everything feels unfamiliar, and your body may react by tensing up, just when it needs to be loose and flexible and sensitive.

But it's not difficult. You just need to get used to it. Yes, you do need a bit of speed in powder. "Speed is your friend," they say. But you really don't need much, especially with today's wider skis. Unfortunately, like water skiing, you can't start out really slowly and expect much success, and you have to find a slope with enough pitch to get a little speed on. A typical green learning run is not steep enough!

So, the next time it snows, find a gentle blue run. Ideally, you'll look for powder that is not truly "bottomless"--maybe 4 to 6 inches of snow that still gives you a solid base of support when you need it--and adds confidence just knowing it's there. But don't hesitate to go out, no matter how much snow there is. Start in a shallow traverse, just steep enough to allow you to gain speed slowly as you glide straight through it. Stand centered fore-and-aft and on both feet, and feel the sensations as your skis start to float up with a little speed. Relax--but not completely. Keep a little tension in your core, a little functional tension throughout your body, which you need for the athletic movements of balancing, especially if the snow is at all uneven. Notice that you don't gain nearly as much speed as you would in the same traverse on harder snow. Powder is slow! Arc uphill to a stop. (Don't try to hit the brakes. The last thing you want in powder is skis going sideways!)

Do it again, this time flexing up and down, allowing the skis to "porpoise" as they float through the snow. Try to find the snow's natural rhythm, like bouncing on a diving board or a trampoline. Make sure you're breathing--easily and naturally (it's common to hold your breath--make sure you aren't!). It shouldn't take you long to learn to enjoy this sensation, and get comfortable with it. Swing your poles forward and back in synch with the rhythm. Don't try to plant them--there's nothing to plant them in--just swing them, fluidly and loosely, with your wrists and fingers.

Next, try very gentle, rhythmic direction changes as you bob up and down. When you stop, look back at your tracks to see the tell-tale "S" curves of powder skiing! You'll find that it doesn't take much turning to slow you down--a lot. Soon, you'll learn to trust that you can take a much straighter line in powder than you can on firmer, faster snow. When you're comfortable with this, go a little steeper, a little faster. It only gets easier--as long as you stay within your comfort zone. The faster you go, the more you'll feel your skis float up beneath you as you relax, and plunge back down as you extend your legs into the powder. Assuming your skis are soft enough and long enough, they'll bend into an arc and help you shape the turn, just like carving on hard snow. Keep the rhythm going--never stop moving--keep swinging your poles.

Keep your upper body and arms as still as possible, letting your legs flex and extend and rotate beneath you. It may be tempting to try to force your skis around by rotating your upper body, but seek to do the work with your legs, letting your skis arc and slice through the snow. As much as possible, keep them going the direction they're pointing, rather than trying to force them to go sideways. This may be easier said than done, because forcing them sideways is our natural defensive instinct. And, frankly, it will get the job done in powder. It's how most skiers ski it--powerful upper body rotation, skis never running far from underneath their bodies--generally poor and inefficient technique, but not entirely ineffective in powder. It's the image that pervades many powder skiing videos and movies, so it may be ingrained in your mind.

But don't do it! Let your skis run. If you find yourself becoming defensive, go back to a shallower slope or traverse, and refind that sensuous, floating, gliding, slicing feeling of skis going the direction they're pointed. Then come back to the smooth, rhythmic movements of your legs that are all it takes to guide your skis and get them to do what they're designed to do. It really doesn't take much effort, or much movement. You'll find that, as your confidence grows and you get comfortable with more speed and with the unique sensations of skiing powder, you'll need to do less and less work. .

Give some attention to the shape of your turns. They should be round--not z's. Make sure that you're aware of at least a moment in each turn when your skis are pointed straight downhill, and you're letting them run that way. Be patient--they'll come around!

It will not take you long, I promise! After playinig with a few of these exercises to get the feel of powder, see if you can find a friend to ski with--someone comfortable in powder. Let your partner set the rhythm, while you practice skiing in sync, making parallel "spooned" tracks, or figure-8's right behind. Take turns in the lead, too, focusing on setting a smooth, consistent rhythm that's easy for your partner to follow.

That's it! If you've gotten this far, you're a confirmed powder hound by now. Start saving for that helicopter trip!



Best regards,
Bob Barnes

PS: Just a few final notes. Make sure you're not falling victim to some of these common myths about powder skiing.
  • You do not need to "lean back" in powder. Assuming your skis are soft enough to bend in powder (most are), you need to stand in the middle, "neutral" in your boot cuffs, applying pressure tip to tail, so that the skis will bend into the arcs they need for "carving" in powder.
  • On the other hand, because the snow is much slower than most firm conditions, the stance that keeps you centered on the skis will, in fact, look somehat further "back" than on groomed snow. The fact that your skis will be floating in the snow, a little more "tips up" than the angle of the slope, also makes the centered stance look a little back. That's OK--and may partially explain the myth of leaning back.
  • Many people suggest narrowing your stance in powder but, unless you tend to ski with an unusually wide stance, I recommend keeping your stance and your movements natural. You don't want a wide stance, but you do want your legs to be able to function--tip and rotate--independently of each other.
  • It is common advice to keep your weight balanced 50:50 on your skis in bottomless powder. While this is what should happen, I don't find that focusing on it is usually the best way to achieve it! Instead, strive to keep your feet at the same depth, moving constantly in harmony, and parallel to each other. If they're the same depth in the snow, the pressure will be "equal." But if you sense one foot getting lighter and you respond by trying to "push" on it, you're more than likely just to throw yourself further out of balance. You can try the "keep em equal" advice--it isn't exactly wrong--but don't be surprised if it actually makes things worse.
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

Reluctance in powder

Bob, thankyou. Everything you said makes sense. I will continue to push myself and have enjoyed the new adventure (except for the 2 trees I clipped last year). Overcoming that hesitancy will be my lst goal this year. Thanks again for the positive comments.
post #4 of 12

belief is KEY

Hi Pete,
I hope Idaho is treating you well!
Bob, I read in the formation of this new area that maybe there was only supposed to be one response. If that's true, sorry and I won't be the second next time. In this case, I think highlighting some of bob's comments might be good from me, as I've skied with Pete and have the earstwhile honor of giving him one of his favorite tips ever (at least that is how i've heard him tell it...).

So, Pete, you have the skills to ski powder brilliantly and with an ear to ear smile! Bob has hit the nail on the head with the sensation discription. If you can ski that chute to the right of the west cliffs at Sugar Bowl, you can RIP blue pow runs. it will just feel different. Read through Bob's sensations again, ski both big toe and little toe actively early season on the groomers, get that "POLE READY" since it gets you thinking of "GOING" not stopping, and you will fall in love. At that point, I do expect an invitation to join you for a snow cat day...

Also, the 174 outlaw will work just fine, of course, but, next time you know your playing and over 12in has fallen, demo a ski that is around 100mm under foot and around a 170. For what I know about you, I think you would love a 173 saloman wide ski that is 100 under foot(i forget the name), also a 176 gotama would make you smile, the coomba may be fun for you as well, i think 174 as well.

Believe,

Holiday
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes/Colorado View Post
It may be tempting to try to force your skis around by rotating your upper body...forcing them sideways is our natural defensive instinct. And, frankly, it will get the job done in powder. It's how most skiers ski it--powerful upper body rotation
A patroller friend of mine refers to this technique as "western pig". Need I say more.

Good comments Bob, and I agree.

I'd like to add that many people who have this timidity about takin' it down the hill in powder are often not skiing consistent powder. If you ski in the areas, you rarely get a "freshie". Mostly people ski on chopped powder, in which there is massive turmoil and chaos. And this is really upsetting and intimidating. So I understand. However, you should practice whenever you can on chopped snow, so you will learn that the chaos is manageable, and you won't shut down. So also, practice Bob's drills on choppy snow A LOT. Once you realize your skis will support that, or at least, their moving around on the line is not as bad as it first feels, then your confidence will grow.

One other specific: Your turning so much that you fall over backwards is really common, since the snow is really active on the skis and little movements get BIG results. Therefore, two ideas:
  • Be soft and economical. Only make the small, smooth movements.
  • The overturning backwards fall can always be avoided by maintaining the inside hand ahead of the body. In almost all cases, immediately prior to this fall, you will see the inside arm drop back. And in all cases, when the inside arm moves forward as the balance starts to go, a recovery is available.
post #6 of 12
I like it guys, that just about covers every nuance of the pow. My two cents will be directed towards enjoying the learning curve. I came from Sugarloaf/USA in Maine, we called it "LOUD POWDAH" I moved to Colorado 11 seasons ago. I could not wait to ski the deep. Ohhh did I suck! I ski about 125 a year, every season now, many of them in silent powder. To put things into perspective, it was about 3 seasons ago that I felt as comfortable letting go in powder, as I did hooking up and letting go on the "BLUE ICE". Summing it up...less is more in powder.

Bottom line, time is on your side, with a bit of time, and patience you will succeed and bring all the above advise to life in your skiing.
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 

Reluctance in Powder

Thanks eveybody. I was a little hesitant to use "Ask a Pro" but have found the answers etc. really great. Can't wait to get out there. Quite a bit of snow the past week, 6" up in the St. Joe Wilderness areas. Sort of nice feeling like a student again, been a while.
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

Reluctance in Powder Continued/Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
Hi Pro's - a really great resource, thankyou in advance.

Problem/Question etc. I have a reluctance to ski fast/fast enough and without worry in powder.

Background. 65yrs, skiing since 32yrs old, raced for 20 yrs, old independent leg (Stenmark era) skier. Have been making transition to new techniques now for 7-8 years. I am hesitant in powder and often turn too much. Have actually turned so much I fell over backwards with my back down the hill. Been trying now for 2 years at getting more off piste into the trees etc. I don't know how to actually perfectly describe my reluctance and I am sure a lot of it is mental (yep I have been accused of being a mental at different times during my life).

I consider myself an advanced skier and can ski moguls, steeps, trees, crud etc. with ok precision. Since I became aware of the "ask a pro" forum here on Epic I thought I would ask.

Me. 65 yrs, good condition, 190, 5'11" General Groomer Ski's Fischer RC4 170cm, off piste K2 Apache Outlaws 174, Boots Nordica Speedmachine 10's. Have been an instuctor for 5 years L1, just teach partime at Silver Mt. Idaho.

As I have stated I do have some reluctance in powder but I still look forward to getting in and practicing/experiencing etc. My age has slowed me down a little, i.e., don;t ski real steep stuff when icy and don't huck cliffs at all. Still like to go fast, enjoy challenges etc.

I read a lot of skiing stuff on Epic and for example read recently every comment on skiing on 2 skis etc. I really don't think it is one thing thats holding me back but rather a hangup in confidence. However if I really knew what I was talking about I wouldn't be here asking the question. Any help you can send my way would/will be appreciated. thanks Pete
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes/Colorado View Post
Hi Pete--

No, I don't think it's just one thing either, with all your experience in so many conditions. I suspect your techniical skills are well up to the challenge of powder. In fact, real powder--that rare, untracked, marshmallow covering of deep or bottomless snow--is really one of the easiest conditions to ski. It can make technically poor skiers look, and feel, like heros. So I'm sure you can do it too!

What is likely is simply that you lack the mileage in powder that will enable you to relax and ski the way you're capable of skiing. Powder--especially deep powder--is a very different environment than most other conditions. It looks different--and you may not be able to see your skis, which can be disconcerting until you get used to it. (Trust me--they're still down there--and you'd know it right away if they weren't!)

More importantly, it feels different. All the sensations that you've learned to expect and react to, that give your body the feedback it needs to perform with skill and polish, and that tell you you're in control, feel different. You don't ski on your edges--you ski on the bottom of your feet, no matter how much your skis are tipped. You float in the the snow, not on it. When you extend your legs, you don't get taller--your feet move lower. There's nothing to "push off" from, and when you start to sense a loss of balance, there's nothing to brace yourself against, or to push on with your feet or poles to recover. And there's no sound--no grating of your edges, or thumping on bumps. Sensations and sounds are all more subtle--it may feel like you're in a sensory deprivation chamber. Everything feels unfamiliar, and your body may react by tensing up, just when it needs to be loose and flexible and sensitive.

But it's not difficult. You just need to get used to it. Yes, you do need a bit of speed in powder. "Speed is your friend," they say. But you really don't need much, especially with today's wider skis. Unfortunately, like water skiing, you can't start out really slowly and expect much success, and you have to find a slope with enough pitch to get a little speed on. A typical green learning run is not steep enough!

So, the next time it snows, find a gentle blue run. Ideally, you'll look for powder that is not truly "bottomless"--maybe 4 to 6 inches of snow that still gives you a solid base of support when you need it--and adds confidence just knowing it's there. But don't hesitate to go out, no matter how much snow there is. Start in a shallow traverse, just steep enough to allow you to gain speed slowly as you glide straight through it. Stand centered fore-and-aft and on both feet, and feel the sensations as your skis start to float up with a little speed. Relax--but not completely. Keep a little tension in your core, a little functional tension throughout your body, which you need for the athletic movements of balancing, especially if the snow is at all uneven. Notice that you don't gain nearly as much speed as you would in the same traverse on harder snow. Powder is slow! Arc uphill to a stop. (Don't try to hit the brakes. The last thing you want in powder is skis going sideways!)

Do it again, this time flexing up and down, allowing the skis to "porpoise" as they float through the snow. Try to find the snow's natural rhythm, like bouncing on a diving board or a trampoline. Make sure you're breathing--easily and naturally (it's common to hold your breath--make sure you aren't!). It shouldn't take you long to learn to enjoy this sensation, and get comfortable with it. Swing your poles forward and back in synch with the rhythm. Don't try to plant them--there's nothing to plant them in--just swing them, fluidly and loosely, with your wrists and fingers.

Next, try very gentle, rhythmic direction changes as you bob up and down. When you stop, look back at your tracks to see the tell-tale "S" curves of powder skiing! You'll find that it doesn't take much turning to slow you down--a lot. Soon, you'll learn to trust that you can take a much straighter line in powder than you can on firmer, faster snow. When you're comfortable with this, go a little steeper, a little faster. It only gets easier--as long as you stay within your comfort zone. The faster you go, the more you'll feel your skis float up beneath you as you relax, and plunge back down as you extend your legs into the powder. Assuming your skis are soft enough and long enough, they'll bend into an arc and help you shape the turn, just like carving on hard snow. Keep the rhythm going--never stop moving--keep swinging your poles.

Keep your upper body and arms as still as possible, letting your legs flex and extend and rotate beneath you. It may be tempting to try to force your skis around by rotating your upper body, but seek to do the work with your legs, letting your skis arc and slice through the snow. As much as possible, keep them going the direction they're pointing, rather than trying to force them to go sideways. This may be easier said than done, because forcing them sideways is our natural defensive instinct. And, frankly, it will get the job done in powder. It's how most skiers ski it--powerful upper body rotation, skis never running far from underneath their bodies--generally poor and inefficient technique, but not entirely ineffective in powder. It's the image that pervades many powder skiing videos and movies, so it may be ingrained in your mind.

But don't do it! Let your skis run. If you find yourself becoming defensive, go back to a shallower slope or traverse, and refind that sensuous, floating, gliding, slicing feeling of skis going the direction they're pointed. Then come back to the smooth, rhythmic movements of your legs that are all it takes to guide your skis and get them to do what they're designed to do. It really doesn't take much effort, or much movement. You'll find that, as your confidence grows and you get comfortable with more speed and with the unique sensations of skiing powder, you'll need to do less and less work. .

Give some attention to the shape of your turns. They should be round--not z's. Make sure that you're aware of at least a moment in each turn when your skis are pointed straight downhill, and you're letting them run that way. Be patient--they'll come around!

It will not take you long, I promise! After playinig with a few of these exercises to get the feel of powder, see if you can find a friend to ski with--someone comfortable in powder. Let your partner set the rhythm, while you practice skiing in sync, making parallel "spooned" tracks, or figure-8's right behind. Take turns in the lead, too, focusing on setting a smooth, consistent rhythm that's easy for your partner to follow.

That's it! If you've gotten this far, you're a confirmed powder hound by now. Start saving for that helicopter trip!



Best regards,
Bob Barnes

PS: Just a few final notes. Make sure you're not falling victim to some of these common myths about powder skiing.
  • You do not need to "lean back" in powder. Assuming your skis are soft enough to bend in powder (most are), you need to stand in the middle, "neutral" in your boot cuffs, applying pressure tip to tail, so that the skis will bend into the arcs they need for "carving" in powder.
  • On the other hand, because the snow is much slower than most firm conditions, the stance that keeps you centered on the skis will, in fact, look somehat further "back" than on groomed snow. The fact that your skis will be floating in the snow, a little more "tips up" than the angle of the slope, also makes the centered stance look a little back. That's OK--and may partially explain the myth of leaning back.
  • Many people suggest narrowing your stance in powder but, unless you tend to ski with an unusually wide stance, I recommend keeping your stance and your movements natural. You don't want a wide stance, but you do want your legs to be able to function--tip and rotate--independently of each other.
  • It is common advice to keep your weight balanced 50:50 on your skis in bottomless powder. While this is what should happen, I don't find that focusing on it is usually the best way to achieve it! Instead, strive to keep your feet at the same depth, moving constantly in harmony, and parallel to each other. If they're the same depth in the snow, the pressure will be "equal." But if you sense one foot getting lighter and you respond by trying to "push" on it, you're more than likely just to throw yourself further out of balance. You can try the "keep em equal" advice--it isn't exactly wrong--but don't be surprised if it actually makes things worse.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holiday View Post
Hi Pete,
I hope Idaho is treating you well!
Bob, I read in the formation of this new area that maybe there was only supposed to be one response. If that's true, sorry and I won't be the second next time. In this case, I think highlighting some of bob's comments might be good from me, as I've skied with Pete and have the earstwhile honor of giving him one of his favorite tips ever (at least that is how i've heard him tell it...).

So, Pete, you have the skills to ski powder brilliantly and with an ear to ear smile! Bob has hit the nail on the head with the sensation discription. If you can ski that chute to the right of the west cliffs at Sugar Bowl, you can RIP blue pow runs. it will just feel different. Read through Bob's sensations again, ski both big toe and little toe actively early season on the groomers, get that "POLE READY" since it gets you thinking of "GOING" not stopping, and you will fall in love. At that point, I do expect an invitation to join you for a snow cat day...

Also, the 174 outlaw will work just fine, of course, but, next time you know your playing and over 12in has fallen, demo a ski that is around 100mm under foot and around a 170. For what I know about you, I think you would love a 173 saloman wide ski that is 100 under foot(i forget the name), also a 176 gotama would make you smile, the coomba may be fun for you as well, i think 174 as well.

Believe,

Holiday

I am almost too embarrassed to ask this but here goes, my desire to ski powder well overcomes my chromozones. I skied about 6-8 in of pretty set up powder yesterday. My friends took off down the hill basically in a straight line with little turns (thats the way they ski almost everything). I can't keep up with them and don't even try. I tried to ski this snow and really couldn't and basically gave up. Sitting in the hot tub this AM-as the snow was coming down- I realized that I don't know what to do with my feet. Rotate, edge pressure or some combination? I had to admit to myself that I really don't know what to do with my feet.

As a learner I respond very well to "do this" (explain verbally is ok-I can picture in my mind very well), then I go do it and if I feel the desired result, that pretty much does it for me-positive. In picturing in my mind I realized that I just ski but don't really have any idea what I should be doing with my feet, especially to initiatve but also the whole turn. If one of you could take the time to tell me I would certainly appreciate. I think I am "getting off to the wrong foot"-so to speak-when skiing powder.

In thinking about this, I remember skiing with VA last year at Schweitzer and he just takes off down the hill and disappears. If I could learn how to start the turn I know practice and experience will quickly enable me to do the same at least I may be able to keep him in sight.

Is or will this be the same start for 1)straight skiing with little bitty changes in direction 2) big swooping turns 3) med radius turns.


THANKYOU IN ADVANCE. Going tommorrow and Monday. We're supposed to get about a foot tonight.
post #9 of 12
Read through Bob's suggestions to find shallow paths to practice on. Do the surfing and bouncing routines he describes. Try to stand on both feet. I like to visualize my skis as sort of a set of bobsled runners that get sort of banked up in turns like bobsleds do--on the sides of the bobsled run. Because the powder slows your progress, you don't need to turn so far. I like to take the bouncing motion into little diversions left and right without thinking of them so much as turns but more as rhythmic alternatives to just bouncing while going in a straight line. As the pitch and speed increase, I try to make those diversions larger and larger by stretching out the bouncing motions, always trying to feel the bottoms of both feet banked up against the snow at the bottom of each bounce.

I've had some students benefit from standing where we're going to enter the powder and use their hands, palms down, in front of them to emulate the movements we're going to make with our feet when we start moving.
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
Read through Bob's suggestions to find shallow paths to practice on. Do the surfing and bouncing routines he describes. Try to stand on both feet. I like to visualize my skis as sort of a set of bobsled runners that get sort of banked up in turns like bobsleds do--on the sides of the bobsled run. Because the powder slows your progress, you don't need to turn so far. I like to take the bouncing motion into little diversions left and right without thinking of them so much as turns but more as rhythmic alternatives to just bouncing while going in a straight line. As the pitch and speed increase, I try to make those diversions larger and larger by stretching out the bouncing motions, always trying to feel the bottoms of both feet banked up against the snow at the bottom of each bounce.

I've had some students benefit from standing where we're going to enter the powder and use their hands, palms down, in front of them to emulate the movements we're going to make with our feet when we start moving.
Thankyou sir, looks like I will get some practice tommorrow. Well put I think I understand fully. I turn too much, too hard and finish to stront in the powder. this should work for me. Great suggestions from Bob and yourself. thanks Pete
post #11 of 12
Hi Pete,
as far as your feet, the footwork is basically the same, but maybe thinking abour your bases instead of your edges would work... I like Kneals idea of the banked bobsled run, ski your bases instead of your edges and let the pressure build up more slowly. patience, belief and... did i say patience?

cheers,
wade
post #12 of 12
Pete, you might also think about Weems' idea of "platforming": the bases are creating a platform in the soft snow that supports you and actually guides you around like Kneale's bobsled run. If you can see that in your imagination, I bet you can do that on/in the snow.
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