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How do you teach a friend to ski? - Page 2

post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by icanseeformiles(andmiles) View Post
Guys, listen to dogonjon. There's not an instructor on this board who didn't cringe just from reading the thread title. If your friend asked you to remove his/her tonsils, and you're not doctor, should you just cause they did the asking? (don't tell me the analogy's not apt, both "operations" can put your friend's life in danger.)

Load of crap. This ain't a black run at Snowbird, or even Vail for that matter.

I usually have people take a lesson. But, to be honest one of the main reasons I do so is so that I can get an hour of skiing in prior to baby sitting a noob on the novice runs.

Legitimate question here: Are there any statistics about first timers who take a lesson from a pro vs. non pro or no instruction who get seriuosly injured on the slopes?

Any deaths?
post #32 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by crank View Post
Legitimate question here: Are there any statistics about first timers who take a lesson from a pro vs. non pro or no instruction who get seriuosly injured on the slopes?

Any deaths?
Actually there was an unfortunate incident somewhere in Colorado last season (Breck maybe?) where a new skier was taught in the morning by friends, picked it up quickly, and proceeded to move up to more difficult trails. I think he finished off his first and last ski day with hitting some ice, getting out of control, and careening into the woods. Needless to say the young man did not survive the incident (think he was a little younger than I am). So yes, first timers can die.

Later

GREG
post #33 of 47
The details.

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news...41/detail.html

If you want to see a really tragic ski safety video, get a copy of the one Vail put out last season. The little girl saying "please daddy don't die" was pretty rough. The skier unfortunately was already dead. It contains other events Vail Ski Patrol has had to deal with.
post #34 of 47
................Ok, but just in case you ignore this advice, this is how you teach a friend to ski. (you didn't hear this from me). Put them on the shortest skis you can find and boots with about 4 buckles. I use my 122 Rossi Flash skis. I mean, "If I were to teach a friend I would use my 122 Flash skis." But otherwise, give your friend a 2 hour lesson at least, the instructor doesn't even have to be competent, just not you.
post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501 View Post
Last year I ran a clinic (for lack of a better word) once a week for the wives of friends of mine. .
Curious. Very suspicious.

Last time we headed down to Oregon my wife specifically asked if I could get her a lesson from Max 501.

The guy is simply a chick magnet.
post #36 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
Curious. Very suspicious.

Last time we headed down to Oregon my wife specifically asked if I could get her a lesson from Max 501.

The guy is simply a chick magnet.
So the presumption is........ they aren't really in it for the skiing ? wondered that myself. Bet those husbands get a lot of vertical during the "camp".
post #37 of 47
." But otherwise, give your friend a 2 hour lesson at least, the instructor doesn't even have to be competent, just not you.[/quote]
It is truly unfortunate that you feel this way. Most of the instructors I have met take their job very seriously, trained not only to deliver instruction but also to analyze particular flaws in movement and balance. This is not learned on the basis of teaching a couple of friends during the course of a lifetime, but knowledge acquired over years of experience. It's not a 'factory fit" for every student. Every person and body type has the ability to create their own inherent problems and the ability to recognize these differences takes teaching out of the amateur level. Go With A Pro
post #38 of 47
Quote:
Bet those husbands get a lot of vertical during the "camp".
And the wives get lots of beefcake?????
post #39 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by daysailer1 View Post
And the wives get lots of beefcake?????
Nope, my wife is there keeping an eye on me.

But, they have a couple of hours of skiing without any judging and plenty of positive feedback.
post #40 of 47
During WWII every GI going off base was urged to "Go With A Pro". Since PSIA wasn't invented yet what was this all about? :
post #41 of 47
Quote:
Nope, my wife is there keeping an eye on me.
Wellllllll, her friends may be too. We women do borrow from the guy code...."We may be married but we're not dead..... That's why some clients getting private lessons for their wife insist on a female instructor or gay instructor.


Quote:
But, they have a couple of hours of skiing without any judging and plenty of positive feedback.
post #42 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by daysailer1 View Post
That's why some clients getting private lessons for their wife insist on ...a gay instructor.
I didn't know you could request one of those... :

Apparently there is a new niche opening up in the ski instruction industry.

Not that it matters... instructors aren't a threat. Everyone knows that racers and freeskiers get the girls anyway.

Later

GREG
post #43 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
I didn't know you could request one of those... :

Apparently there is a new niche opening up in the ski instruction industry.
I saw it for the first time last season when I moved to a new mountain. A female instructor got the lesson. As these are high tipping clients, some of the guys insisted they could pretend to be gay. BTW, these were snowboard instructors.
post #44 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
Actually there was an unfortunate incident somewhere in Colorado last season...
Unfortunate anecdote, but the question didn't ask for anecdotes. And while I'm all for people taking instruction from pros, I think it would be unwise to claim that this kid wouldn't have died if only he had taken a lesson from a pro in the morning. Establishing that causal relationship would require some stronger evidence IMO.

The appropriate answer to the original question is of course to direct your friend to a good pro...unless you have a hill in your back yard, a case of beer, and a buddy who claims he can do anything...
Quote:
Originally Posted by daysailer1
That's why some clients getting private lessons for their wife insist on a female instructor or gay instructor.
I wouldn't want to go through life with that kind of jealousy...but that is an amusing story.
post #45 of 47
Garett, you're 23 and you speak/write like a 65 year old professor. I don't know if I should be impressed or concerned
post #46 of 47
Thread Starter 
Wow i had no idea this thread was moved. You guys are all right, i never really did think of the consequences, it was only Blue after all though... I guess i should be taking people to pros then from now on.. I appreciate it
post #47 of 47
From my own learning experience I found there is a lot that is not taught
in ski school anyway and I always got the most out of a lesson when
I felt like an expert prior to the lesson as I felt more relaxed during
the lesson and I was told during my first lesson I had to relax which
did work for me when I took further lessons.
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