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Favorite Bump Run - Page 4

post #91 of 110

Not in order...

Outhouse - Winter Park (if I'm only choosing one per resort, then that would be my winner)

AMF - Snowmass

Black Rock - Jungfrau (just for some Eurobumps)

post #92 of 110

Hey Fox Hat, or anybody else with turns on both sides of the pond.

 

Is there a noticeable difference between Euro and NA bump runs?  Looks like you guys get a lot more above timberline runs, but does it cause the bumps and bump runs to be noticeably different?

 

For that matter do Euros tend to ski a different ski than NA skiers? 

 

This is  a curious mind just off the cardio machine.  Too much time to think deep thoughts there.

post #93 of 110

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

Is there a noticeable difference between Euro and NA bump runs?  Looks like you guys get a lot more above timberline runs, but does it cause the bumps and bump runs to be noticeably different?

 

Noticeable? Maybe. It's the little differences. A lot of the same bumps you have over there, we have here, but they're a little different.

Examples?

Well, in Austria, you have to have a beer in a mountain restaurant. And I don't mean a little bottle of weak Bud ultralit. They give you a litre stein of beer. In France, you can buy beer at the ski school. Also, you know what they call a bump run in France?

 

They don't call it a bump run?

 
No, they got the metric system there, they wouldn't know what a bump run is.
 
What'd they call it?
 
 
A "Mogul Field"
 
"Mogul Field"? What'd they call a ski instructor?
 
A ski instructor is a ski instructor, but they call him Le Ski Instructor.
 
...etc...
 
Anyway, since most of the Euro runs are above the tree line it means that the snow is less protected, so once a bump gets hard and icy, fresh snow doesn;t stay on it too long and will get blown off.
Bump runs tend to be off-piste or on Itineraries, since most pistes will be groomed regularly.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

 

For that matter do Euros tend to ski a different ski than NA skiers? 

 

 

I'm tempted to say yes, certainly my experiences in Austria would want me to spend more time on narrower skis - more suited to the firmer conditions on piste.

I think I've also seen more skiers on older equipment in Europe - there's less of a desire to run out and buy the latest gear - so don't be too surprised to see some 210cm skis and rear entry boots. But most people have moved on to modern gear.

post #94 of 110

favorite/bump = oxymoron; but seriously, skied Stelvio when I lived in Europe in the mid-sixties. Drove in from the North on a little sheephearders path, had to wait several times for sheep. And yet, best moguls I had ever skied, and still the equal to any. reason: only national team skiers were skiing there for summer training, all in the fall line, never a chopped or perpendicular mogul, evenly placed, rhythmic and smooooooth. Those guys never turn their shoulders, so you won't have to either.

 

Fox Hat, that is my favorite film, and you transcribed it beautifully; from it's the little differences, I suspected something, and it gradually fleshed out for me. very funny. I have one: How many feet of fresh up there?....we should have fat skis for this kinda deal... 


Edited by davluri - 5/27/2009 at 04:43 pm GMT
post #95 of 110

 

"It's not that you suck at bumps...it's just that bumps show how badly you ski."

post #96 of 110

Challenger @ Mount Snow

The Face @ Val D'Isere

Piste S @ Val D'Isere

Little Dipper @ Heavenly

Gunbarrel @ Heavenly

 

Not in an order. Not really thinking that hard right now, it's midnight almost here in London so I'll have to come back and edit my post within the next day or two.

post #97 of 110

Yeah, Face can be fun when it gets bumped out.

post #98 of 110

A the whole Mad River Valley is full of top shelf bump runs and trails.

@the Bush:

                 Stein's, Paradise (and Paradise Woods), all of CastleRock, but I love Middle Earth!

                 In the old days Organgrinder

@G Ellen: Upper FIS, Exterminator

@MRG: Most everything! Chute, Paradise, Fall Line

 

A-Basin: Alley 4, 13 Cornices, Pali

 

I'm mostly a spring bump skier. Ever get a hit of corn up the nose to your brain?

I've tickled my optic nerve more than once!

 

post #99 of 110

The Swiss Wall, Portes du Soleil

The entrance can be a bit chaotic:

 

Looking down from the top:

 

Looking up from the bottom:

 

It's long, steep and with huge bumps. A bit crowded, though. This is late in the season, as the brown snow shows. That also mean these were huge, slushy, explode-on-impact moguls.

post #100 of 110

Bump Runs

Highline- Vail

Grouse Mountain runs- Beaver Creek

High Rustler- Alta

post #101 of 110

 

At K

Royal Flush

Devels Fiddle

Needles Eye

Downdraft

 

Giant Killer at Pico

 

Anything from the peak of Sugarbush

 

RW

post #102 of 110

It is probably not anyone's favorite bump run, and it probably does not qualify as such anyway, but are there any larger bumps than the ones at the entrance to the Hobacks at Jackson Hole?

post #103 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

Hey Fox Hat, or anybody else with turns on both sides of the pond.

 

Is there a noticeable difference between Euro and NA bump runs?  Looks like you guys get a lot more above timberline runs, but does it cause the bumps and bump runs to be noticeably different?

 

For that matter do Euros tend to ski a different ski than NA skiers? 

 

This is  a curious mind just off the cardio machine.  Too much time to think deep thoughts there.

You've really gotta time your bump runs right, assuming you're above treeline, as you so often are in the Alps. In the early season, the light can be poor, and it's tough to anticipate well in bumps. In the spring, the runs can be rock hard until the sun has warmed them for a few hours.
I think European bump runs are slightly easier than some similarly pitched bump runs in N. America only because, being tree-free, there are fewer obstacles, more possible lines and it's much easier to see far ahead, aiding anticipation.
 

 

As noted here, much of the bump skiing is either offpiste or "itinerary "(that gray area between piste and true offpiste), as grooming tends to the obsessive at many European resorts. My hill has a great itinerary (ski route or something similar in the German languages I think), the legendary Canalone, which bumps up quickly given that it's very narrow and gets a fair amount of traffic.

Equipment-wise, we're starting to see the same trends as in NorAm, though Europeans follow racing much more than Americans do, so you still see more race-inspired gear here. Fat, fat skis make more sense in the Alps than they do in, say, New Hampshire; less than in, for example, Montana. That doesn't mean people don't ride them, of course. I own SL race skis which I happily use about 10-15 days a year. If I lived in Bend or SLC or Nelson I'd save my shekels and buy another pair o' fatties, for sure.

 

Probably less use of technical apparel here than in the States too. And tighter fits. Fewer helmets, though that's changing. Lots of sunglass use vs. goggles (I've joined in on this as well), as it's often warmer here than in Vermont or Wyoming or whatever.

And, of course, the essential European conundrum: more alcohol available/less drinking (except in Austria, where all bets are blissfully off).

post #104 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post


Probably less use of technical apparel here than in the States too. And tighter fits. Fewer helmets, though that's changing. Lots of sunglass use vs. goggles (I've joined in on this as well), as it's often warmer here than in Vermont or Wyoming or whatever.

And, of course, the essential European conundrum: more alcohol available/less drinking (except in Austria, where all bets are blissfully off).



 

Interesting observations. I've personally noticed a lot more helmut usage in Europe than in NA. My NA experience is limited to the PNW, though. Maybe that makes a difference. I'm refering to piste-skiers, not those heading out of bounds.

More significantly, I'm constantly getting yelled at by lifties in Europe for forgetting to put the safety bar down. It's not that I'm against putting it down, I just forget when I'm alone (and smacked in the back of the head when with strangers). I'm not really sure why they care so much. Given that most everything else seems to be permitted on the slopes in Europe, I'm surprised that this is why I get threatened with a pulled pass.

As for alcohol, again maybe this is due to the PNW being my point of comparison. I would say there is infinitely more drinking on the slopes in Europe, and not just in Austria (although certainly more pronounced there).
post #105 of 110
Well, you're right there's more drinking on the slopes, even in Italy, than at US resorts. Hell, in the US you probably can't sell beer on the slopes at all.

But I wasn't really getting at that. A lot of Italians, for example drink a glass of wine or beer with lunch, no matter where they are.

I meant DRINKING. Way more of that at the Mangy Moose, Stunted Hedgehog, Wornout Wildebeest or Darn Marmut-type apres-ski places in the States or Canada than in the Alps. Course, tourists from Britain or Germany tend to change the dynamic some. There's certainly a lot of consumption at bars in Verbier, for example. Even Cervinia lights up when the Brits are in town.

It's just that it's a little less of the local tradition to put away a few after skiing here than in the States. And I, for one, think that's a shame (again, Austria stands apart vs. other Alpine countries in this regard). Tea after skiing? WTF?

Also, vis helmets. I haven't skied in Nor Am for a couple seasons, but from looking at pics and videos, it appears that style is swinging a little bit back toward the wooly hat. So perhaps you're right.

More Madesiminers are donning helmets now than a few years back, that's for sure, but only 'cause they wanna be like me.
post #106 of 110

Upper River/ Exhibition (skied in one continuous run) Sun Valley
Upper River/Mid & Lower Holiday (continuous run) Sun Valley
Plunge/Stairs Telluride

These combo runs allow me to get a lot of mogul vertical in one run.
Back in the day, at SV, it allowed us to get in about 25,000 vertical in just 4 hours. Get up late, go home early. Clarification: 4 hours does not include 9 minute drive to lift.

This shot of Mid-Holiday at Sun Valley is a good example of how moguls develop there, big tops with a nice random pattern. Fun to ski!
Mid Holiday at Sun Valley
Photo Credit: Robbie Hilliard 2007

post #107 of 110
SV has always had fine bumps.  Some of the best in the west.  Thanks Mr. Hariman.
post #108 of 110
Alright, I get your distinction regarding alcohol. Again, my experience in NA is limited mostly to resorts in the PNW that may not even have any base facilities open after the lifts shut, so that certainly skews my perception. I suppose Whistler is the only real large resort I've been to, unless Bend counts (but I was 16 and with my parents). Stevens Pass is pretty dead at the end of the day, and even Crystal clears out pretty quickly.

Likewise, the non-Austrian Euro places I've been may have been on the exceptionally lively end of things (Chamonix, Verbier, Engelberg and admittedly much more quite La Clusaz and Les Crossets). With that sample, Chambre Neuf pretty easily takes the cake every time, with honorable mention to Yucatan as well as the improbably cheap happy hour beer at the Mt Fort Pub. Of course even the smallest Austrian resort beats all comers.

Regarding helmets, I haven't skied in NA for about five years, so I have no idea what it's like now. I just remember being struck by how many people I saw wearing them when I started skiing in Europe, and how anyone who has come over to Europe to ski with me has also commented on it. But the tide may very well have shifted in NA without my knowing. I always assumed it was sort of the converse of bicycle helmets. How millions of Europeans' heads aren't splattered across the road each year is a mystery to me.

Anyway, my girlfriend keeps bugging me to get one, and I think this will be the year I break down and do it.
post #109 of 110

The bike helmet thing is amazing, you're right. I wear one to commute and I am in the serious minority (must be around 2-3%).

 

Another non-Austrian resort that has a lot of apres drinking is Zermatt, and for sure the bars aren't full of Brits; I heard a lot of German spoken. But I don't speak the language myself, so can't tell whether the revellers were Swiss locals or German tourists. I suspect the latter, but dunno.

post #110 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by shipps View Post

Mid Holiday at Sun Valley
Photo Credit: Robbie Hilliard 2007


That. Is. Awesome.
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