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Pre-season conditioning

post #1 of 64
Thread Starter 
Just thought I would bounce this out to hopefully get good suggestions to get into best shape for the upcoming season.

I’m in my mid 40’s and in good shape. Meaning, I have the proper weight for my height and somewhat active, biking swimming, walks etc. Sorry no running.

I joined a fitness club 3 weeks ago and I’m targeting the following activities Monday thru Friday (weekends off):
Start off with 10 mins. cardio with my heart rate at 80%, 3 mins cool off.
I rotate each day different arm/chest/abs/back exercises etc.
I daily rotate as follows, day ‘a’ leg squats, leg extensions, leg curls, day ‘b’ leg swings in and out, not sure what they call this machine. Does the inner and outer of the thigh.
All done on weight machines.
I do 3 reps of 12-15 each and move up 5-10 lbs each week were possible

I also add some strenuous bike riding on the weekend.

If I keep to this schedule, will that be enough?
I’m hoping to be able to jump into moguls and keep my stamina up for a good run.
With out really something to create the same action as moguls, I’m not sure if I will be able to meet my goal.

Suggestions?
post #2 of 64
Congratulations on starting your fitness program!! Getting started is probably the hardest step to take! With that said, you seem to have a trypical strength training program taking in to account all body parts. This is a good start to get the body used to the new stresses you are placing on yourself.
However, skiing is a sport that involves movement,particularly dynamic balance or shall we say balance while moving.Along with that we have terrain changes which at times can be unpredictable. We need to incorperate excersise that bring in these types of movements. There may be certain tools in your gym that you can utilize to help you obtain this kind of fitness.

Have you seen the bosu? http://www.bosu.com/ This is one of the best tools around. Check out their site!

I am sure there will be others that will chime in on this thread-I am sure Lisamarie will come join,and also Snotrainer and others I am sure.

This is a subject that has been well discussed in this forum-do a search and you should come up with alot!!

T
post #3 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by soundrulz View Post
Just thought I would bounce this out to hopefully get good suggestions to get into best shape for the upcoming season.

I’m in my mid 40’s and in good shape. Meaning, I have the proper weight for my height and somewhat active, biking swimming, walks etc. Sorry no running.

I joined a fitness club 3 weeks ago and I’m targeting the following activities Monday thru Friday (weekends off):
Start off with 10 mins. cardio with my heart rate at 80%, 3 mins cool off.
I rotate each day different arm/chest/abs/back exercises etc.
I daily rotate as follows, day ‘a’ leg squats, leg extensions, leg curls, day ‘b’ leg swings in and out, not sure what they call this machine. Does the inner and outer of the thigh.
All done on weight machines.
I do 3 reps of 12-15 each and move up 5-10 lbs each week were possible

I also add some strenuous bike riding on the weekend.

If I keep to this schedule, will that be enough?
I’m hoping to be able to jump into moguls and keep my stamina up for a good run.
With out really something to create the same action as moguls, I’m not sure if I will be able to meet my goal.

Suggestions?
Ya, jumping rope. There is nothing that similates mogul skiing better than jumping rope. Draw two lines on the floor about a foot apart and jump from one side to the other making sure your hands are just in front but out to the side, trying to max out at about 150 jumps. Start out with 30 and progress up to 150. The up and down movement coupled with the side to side will get you into rythym and shape in about a month or so.
post #4 of 64
SIMPLE EXERCISE: I work out regularly, every day actually, and the "trainor guy" suggested an exercise that seems so easy, and yet it is very difficult to do. Simply stand up, in workout - tennis shoes, to begin bend your knees only slightly as emulating being in your ski boots, and then with your hands to the side, back straight, bend your knees, not all the way to the 90' angle - but bend them and then straighten up - and repeat 500 times. It lets the quads know you have warmed them up.
post #5 of 64

Congrats on preparing yourself Soudrulz!

You have already taken quite a few steps in becoming a better skier, we applaud your efforts!

First, your awareness and desire to improve you body...which is your most valuable piece of "ski equipment."

Second, you made a plan and third you have taken action! Not many can do what you did.

When looking a conditioning for something, there will be many "recipes" to get to the same end goal...you just have to find which works best for you.

Above anything else, you have to enjoy what you are doing. Without that, it will be like pulling teeth to get anyone to want to exercise.

Tcarey was correct in stating that you have a great start. And the concern is that at some point you will have to get a little more specific to the demands of skiing...it is not to say that what you are doing is bad. There just may be some different ways to get to your goal which may work better for you.

However, if you start looking at many factors like time, effort, and possible money...each of these will play a role in deciding which "recipe" to follow.

For skiing specifically, you would want to emphasize some of the following areas:
  • Total body coordination
  • Deceleration strength
  • The ability to resist and create rotation
  • Core stability and strength
  • Local muscular endurance
  • Cardiovascular/regenration capacity
  • Dynamic balance
While some of these terms may sound complex, it may be simplified by having a plan that may accomplish those exact goals.

Not to use this as a means of self-promotion, but our Ski Exercise Training System - S.E.T.S. gets into the specifics of all this information.

We commend you on your desire and commitment to condition yourself for skiing.

Train Hard and Ski Harder!
The SNOtrainers
post #6 of 64
First,its great that you've started a fitness program.
As the others have said,Bosu & jumping rope are great tools.
Bosu for balance & stablization,jump rope for speed & rythym.
A few things to consider.
1: Switch the isolation machine work with multi joint compound movements. Instead of leg ext,& leg curls do squats,lunges & deadlifts
2: Mid-line stabilization ,planks,side planks,L-sits,hanging knee raises,hollow rocks,and something most people don't realize is putting heavy things overhead.This includes over head squats & shoulder presses while standig not sitting. Another over looked mid line stabilizer is the hand stand.
3:Hip Extension, no one without the capacity for a powerful hip extension enjoys great athletic prowess.
4:Flexibility
There is much more,but you have started and thats great,good luck.
post #7 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by loboskis View Post

...2: Mid-line stabilization ,planks,side planks,L-sits,hanging knee raises,hollow rocks,and something most people don't realize is putting heavy things overhead.This includes over head squats & shoulder presses while standig not sitting.
3:Hip Extension, no one without the capacity for a powerful hip extension enjoys great athletic prowess.
Mid-line stabilization ?? what are planks, side planks. and hollow rocks??

So you are saying: do over head press while standing? and what do you mean by over head squats?

Hip flexion would be the old 'sit up', what is hip extension exersize?
post #8 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by soundrulz View Post
day ‘b’ leg swings in and out, not sure what they call this machine. Does the inner and outer of the thigh.

Suggestions?
I believe the machine is hip abduction (away from the bodies midline), hip adduction, toward the midline.

I like doing leg press, the one in the free weight area, laying on your back and pushing a sled up a incline.

This minimizes the compressive forces in your back as opposed to a squat with a bar and weights.

Stretch....especially if you want to do moguls. Low back, hips, quads, hams, and calf muscles.
post #9 of 64
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all who responded!

Lots of great ideas! I will try to incorporate into my activities.
I didn't mention the stretching part. I started this a long time ago.

Cheers
post #10 of 64

Mountain Biking

Have fun and mix it up!

Bosu, jump rope, core strengthening, flexibility, and numerous other great ideas are mentioned above.

Mountain Biking has not been mentioned. As far as I'm concerned it's an awesome part of preseason conditioning. It gets you outdoors, works on leg strength, core strength, endurance and balance.

Mountain Biking also includes to a skill set necessary for skiing - Picking a line. Biking on difficult terrrain forces you to concentrate and allows you to use and develop skills that are very similar to skiing.
post #11 of 64
No not done yet! I was looking for an article on weight training, Russian power lifters. I believe that the Russian power lifters increased the weight of their squats by an average of 16%? by strengthening their forearms! The point is.... think total body strengthening and conditioning, don't just do legs.
post #12 of 64
All good stuff.

You might consider a consult or two with a personal trainer for the development of a program. Ski specific exercises can go a long way in increasing the enjoyability of your skiing experience. Further, a trainer will let you know how your form might be off and reducing the effectiveness of the exercises. I regularly train at a gym that is used by both x-country and d-hill national team members and get to watch what they do. Although weight training is included, thay also do alot of core, eccentric, balance, speed, coordination, power and endurance work. I think that your program will go a long way, but a more vaired program that is ski specific will help more. A trainer could help you do things that target skiing better.

Also, someone mentioned flexability. Don't forget to stretch your quads, hamstrings, hip flexors, IT band, and gluts on a daily basis.
post #13 of 64
I always have felt that doing some sprint workouts are a good way to get a cardio workout for skiing. I don't like doing long endurance runs but will throw one in as a way to build endurance. I start out by running on a track for a couple laps to get warmed up, then work into doing 400 meter sprints, walk a 100 meters, then run a 400. Run at about 70-85% effort and build up from doing 4-5x400 to as many as 12x400's. Or do shorter 200 meters with 30 seconds to 60 second rest periods. Shorter rests for a higher intensity workout. I also like to find a hill with a 3-5% grade that's about 200 meters long or longer and run that 8-10 times.

Another good leg workout is doing wall sits where you basicaly put your back up againt a wall for 60 seconds or so and build up the amount of time you sit against the wall. I start out doing 3-4x60 seconds with 60 second rest. I'll then add 5 seconds each week until I'm up to 2 minutes with 1 minute rest. I like to do leg lunges with dumbells too. Or you can get a bench or wood box about 12"-18" high and step up on to it or jump up on to it. For increased strength you can do a step up with dumbells too.
post #14 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
Mid-line stabilization ?? what are planks, side planks. and hollow rocks??

So you are saying: do over head press while standing? and what do you mean by over head squats?

Hip flexion would be the old 'sit up', what is hip extension exersize?
planks,get in a pushup position but instead of your hands you rest on your forearms.Hold that pos.for 45-60 seconds.
side plank ,same idea on your side rest on forearm. if you google either one I'm sure you'll get pictures.
hollow rock,lie on your back ,hands togther over your head,elevate your feet,arms&head so that you form a cresant.Now rock from heel to hands.
There will be a thump as you pass over the lumbar spine. when you have developed your lower abs sufficently you will be able to eliminate the thump and smoothly rock. try 3 sets of 15 HR's planks &side planks.

Yes over head while standing, it recruits the core as well as legs.
Over head squats,start with a broomstick. Use a wide grip ,at least double shoulder width. With the stick overhead ,first shrug your shoulders.keep them up ,this keeps them in a safe position. Drop into a full squat. Do not let the bar travel foreward .These will expose tightness from your wrists to your ankles and everything between. Once you add some weight it is tops in midline stabilization.
Hip ex. ,try Push presses.,similar to the over head press only now you add a hip thrust.Rack the bar at your shoulders,in front,do a quarter squat at most,send your butt back towards the wall..Rise up thrusting your hip& pelvis foreward and pressing the bar overhead.
post #15 of 64

Overhead Squats Rule

Overhead Squats are the greatest exercise of all time. Here's an old thread on them that has ton of good links-though I didn't check if they're still active:


http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...verhead+squats
post #16 of 64
btw here's a really good recent article on squatting from T-nation:

http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle.do?id=1736931
post #17 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganjala2 View Post
btw here's a really good recent article on squatting from T-nation:

http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle.do?id=1736931
nice article, those power lifting guys are just nuts.
post #18 of 64
Don't laugh - but I bought a compact stair stepper at Brookstone last year that really helped me build up strength for skiing. The trick with this particular machine is that when you push down, the 'vector' angles outward so you're not just simulating a set of stairs. If I crouch down a FEW inches when I do this, then my hams get a particularly great workout. The thing cost $100. I can get on it 5-10 times a day for 10-15 minutes at a pop and even read ski magazines while I'm feeling the burn.

Bosu is great for stomach crunches by the way.
post #19 of 64
Since so many of the guys I know have back problems, I figure it is very important to exercise the back. So in addition to the usual stuff, I exercise my back muscles in every axis I can think of --

-- sit ups
-- "reverse sit ups" where you are on your stomach with your legs held down and you raise your upper body
-- stand up with a dumbell in one hand, and scrunch sideways and then straighten up. Repeat on the other side.
-- stand up with a dumbell in each hand and twist as far as you can, working against inertia. (There is a gym machine that does a similar thing, pushing against a weight with your shoulders by twisting, but for some reason I hate that thing.)

The other important muscle action that traditional gym equipment doesnt do much for is sideways movement with your legs and ankles. I never came up with anything very good. I think LisaMarie's suggestion of jumping rope across a line may be just the thing.

(A confession. I exercise hard in preseason conditioning, then turn into a blob when the season is over. Time to get serious again.)
post #20 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post
Ya, jumping rope. There is nothing that similates mogul skiing better than jumping rope. Draw two lines on the floor about a foot apart and jump from one side to the other making sure your hands are just in front but out to the side, trying to max out at about 150 jumps. Start out with 30 and progress up to 150. The up and down movement coupled with the side to side will get you into rythym and shape in about a month or so.
+ infinity squared
So correct…absolutely, positively, the most beneficial exercise routine that you can perform. It is the gold standard and the fastest way to achieve overall peak physical performance in a compressed period of time. The greatest athletes in the world know this fact. Anything else substituted is just avoiding the effort and discipline required.
post #21 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post
+ infinity squared
So correct…absolutely, positively, the most beneficial exercise routine that you can perform. It is the gold standard and the fastest way to achieve overall peak physical performance in a compressed period of time. The greatest athletes in the world know this fact. Anything else substituted is just avoiding the effort and discipline required.
http://www.buddyleejumpropes.com/
post #22 of 64
Oops - wrong attribution. Sorry Lars.
post #23 of 64
I'd rather do the weight work with free weights than machines. The free weights work more muscle groups and improve balance. Add using pulleys & ropes to the free weight group when these can replace machines. To improve balance more, do as many weight exercises when sitting, laying, or standing on balance balls or balance discs, and do alternate arm dumbells, again to improve balance. Some of the WC racers do presses while standing on a balance ball! (Balance is a combination of the balance sensors in the inner ear sending signals to the small muscles that do the actual balancing work. Those can be exercised for improvement).

Consider yoga. Seriously consider yoga. In addition to flexibility and balance, there is a big improvement in kinesthetic awareness...just where is this or that body part, and how do I get it to do what I want it to do. Big help when skiing.

For more stamina, I'd do much more cardio on the days you don't do a lot of weights. I'd never do weights every day. The muscles need a day or two (one when young, more when older) to rest and rebuild.
post #24 of 64
For those who haven't had a chance to see this.
http://www.gordbrownskiing.com/Coolstuff.htm

Check out the links in the 2cd row!

T
post #25 of 64
http://www.gordbrownskiing.com/Coolstuff.htm

Man and I thought telling you all to do diagonal Plyometric jumps down a hillside would be to dangerous.

It looks like they are training to be circus performers.:
post #26 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by loboskis View Post
.


Yes over head while standing, it recruits the core as well as legs.
Over head squats,start with a broomstick. Use a wide grip ,at least double shoulder width. With the stick overhead ,first shrug your shoulders.keep them up ,this keeps them in a safe position. Drop into a full squat. Do not let the bar travel foreward .These will expose tightness from your wrists to your ankles and everything between. Once you add some weight it is tops in midline stabilization.
Tried these today. I used the bar only, 45 lbs I think. Core needs to remain firm. Seems good. I also did Smith machine squats 200 lbs 12-15 rep x 3 sets.

I was nervous about the hollow rock, back is a huge problem. But I may try it next time.

bz
post #27 of 64
post #28 of 64

The OH Squat!

The OH Squat is an AWESOME exercise that is also a great assessment tool.

While it is difficult to assess yourself, if you can do this in front of a mirror or have someone watch you and give you feedback. You can start by holding a broomstick.

As many will experience when doing this exercise is the realization that it is very difficult to squat with your arms overhead (not even with any weights).

That said, here are some things to look for when doing this challenging squat:
  • Feet turn out
  • Heel(s) rise
  • Hip shifting
  • Lumbar extension (arching)
  • Lumbar flexing (rounding, aka "tuck butt")
  • Knee(s) move in
  • Knee(s) move out
  • Arm(s) fall forward
  • Elbow(s) bend
  • Abnormal shoulder elevation
  • Head migrates forward
This list is a start to how you respond to movement. Based on what you find, you can begin to find your strengths and weaknesses. You can start to compile a list of areas that need to be addresses in terms of flexibility and/or stabilized.

Usually, there are many assymetries between right and left sides.

See what you find and now that you can start to look for certain things you will begin to find and learn things about yourself -- "You can only see what your brain knows!" -- Lenny Paracinno

Ski You later,
The SNOtrainers
post #29 of 64
Sorry that I didn't get to this earlier. I've been swamped with fitness and travel writing assignmenst, and once I get started writing here, I don't stop, which means my I don't meet deadlines! :

I'm going to make this simple. Whatever Snowtrainer says, do it!

Also, at the risk of opening up another can of worms: STEP AWAY FROM THE LEG EXTENSION MACHINE!

Do a search in this forum for more info.

Sorry, I can't go into detail. I'm in training as a mentor for Snowboard Outreach Society, soon to become the liberated SnowSport Outreach Society.

Gotta Run!
post #30 of 64
soundrulz,
I'm in about the same boat as you are age wise, fitness wise and motivation wise. I've been doing quite a bit standard gym training plus a lot of balance specific excersizes.

Lisa Marie didn't say it so I will: buy her book!
I've been reading it the last couple days and I think it rocks! Its a great resource for not only getting into great shape but preparing your body specifically for snow sliding. My goal is to be in the best skiing shape of my life by the time I'm on a chairlift again and this book, as well as a bunch of the info here will help me do it.
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