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What is the proper DIN setting for me?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I am 51 yrs old, 5'9", 180 lbs, good physical condition, ski rather aggresively and prefer steeper and deeper off-piste. I'm never sure what level, maybe 7+? I'm not into park skiing or big air. And on occasion I do fall and sometimes lose a ski, and have been known to hike back up ... or down for retreival. Like most perhaps, I want the bindings tight enough only to lose them on RARE occasions, yet prefer not to break a leg or hurt myself. By whatever standards used based on the above criteria, most shops recommend a setting seemingly way to inadequate for what I feel it should be, any thoughts out there?
post #2 of 18
See if they'll allow you to label yourself a Type III+ skier.

Other than that, you're probably not going to get much in the way of advice on this topic given the legal liability surrounding it.
post #3 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbakersnow View Post
I am 51 yrs old, 5'9", 180 lbs, good physical condition, ski rather aggresively and prefer steeper and deeper off-piste. I'm never sure what level, maybe 7+? I'm not into park skiing or big air. And on occasion I do fall and sometimes lose a ski, and have been known to hike back up ... or down for retreival. Like most perhaps, I want the bindings tight enough only to lose them on RARE occasions, yet prefer not to break a leg or hurt myself. By whatever standards used based on the above criteria, most shops recommend a setting seemingly way to inadequate for what I feel it should be, any thoughts out there?
This thread has lotsa answers as well as chart references. May be helpful.

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=35360
post #4 of 18
One key missing piece of information is your boot sole length. Can't calculate DIN without it.

Bear in mind that the standard DIN chart methodology drops you one level for being over 50. So a III+ will equate to a 49-year-old's III. Assuming your BSL falls in the 291-310mm range, your setting as a level III would be 6.75, and a 49-year-old's III/your III+ setting would be a 7.5, according to http://www.dinsetting.com/.
post #5 of 18
The criteria that shops use to set binding release values are height, weight, age of the skier, skier type, and boot sole length. For a 50 year old skier, a binding technician makes a correction that will lighten the release value. The industry feels someone 50 or over has had their fair share of wear and tear, so a lighter release value is valid to prevent injuries. For most skiers 50 or over, this is acceptible. There are a few skiers out there that this isn't the case.

When I worked as a technician, I set the bindings for one of my regular customers at industry standards. One day he was skiing in mushy snow and overpowered his bindings. He released and dislocated his shoulders. My regular customer doesn't ski like the average 60 year old. He's an ex-racer who can bend a ski like a younger skier.

What you can do if you choose to do so or if the shop allows you to is to sign an additional release to have your release value set at a higher value than what the industry standard is. Iskifast4u also mentioned something worthwhile. If the type 3+ category is available, you may want to choose that category.

Dennis
post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thank you all. I'm not exactly certain what my boot length is, a street shoe size of ~ 10. I guess another question tied to the first, understanding caution and liability issues of answers (I reckon'), is that over the summer for the first time I released the tension on all my bindings with a screw driver on both toe and heels. Now what I would like to do before hiiting the slopes is re-tighten them to where they were before, which I believe was between 8 and 9. Is it that simple or do I need to go to a shop, sign the waiver, pay the bucks, and have them do essentially the same thing - of course with the testing equipment (torque bar looking gadget) to make certain the tension effectively releases, and of which I do not have. In part, I believe that function is something I'd like to be able to do now myself ... self-sufficiency. Thoughts?
post #7 of 18
It's easy to do. I've done it for years. I'm not telling you to do it.
BTW if you can't ski at a DIN release setting of 8 without coming out of your bindings you're doing something wrong, barring ludicrous-speed : runs through rough terrain (you need to crank up for that or your skis can shake right off your boots).

Edited to add: Having a correct forward pressure setting is very important too.
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbakersnow View Post
Thank you all. I'm not exactly certain what my boot length is, a street shoe size of ~ 10.
My boots have the length stamped into the boot near the base of the boot, in the back near the heal. Maybe yours does too.
post #9 of 18
Just take a tape measure and measure it.
post #10 of 18
mtbakersnow-I'm the same size as you. Just 2 inches taller and a few years older. Atomic boot BSL 337 which is a size 10 B street shoe. Anyways my DIN is 8. On the charts 5 or 6.: I don't think so. I could prolly run at 10 safely but it is very seldom I pre-release. I don't jump,huck or do the twisty flippy. But do ski everything in front of me. No Fear,right.
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post
Atomic boot BSL 337 which is a size 10 B street shoe.
BSLs don't correlate to size across models, let alone brands. My Tecnica Rival RX 28.5s (10.5 US) have a 324mm boot sole.

But as someone else pointed out, BSLs are typically embossed on the side of the boot.
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
It's easy to do. I've done it for years. I'm not telling you to do it.
BTW if you can't ski at a DIN release setting of 8 without coming out of your bindings you're doing something wrong, barring ludicrous-speed : runs through rough terrain (you need to crank up for that or your skis can shake right off your boots).

Edited to add: Having a correct forward pressure setting is very important too.
that's balloney: depends what kind of skier you are how LONG are the skis and how difficult is the terrain you ski on. I'm close to the age described here and my setting are never less than 11 on the heel abnd 12 at the toe piece: usualy first few day of a season I'm going down by 1DIN

BTW: I do not recommend these setting for anybody

who cares whether it is a zone which doesn't allow to to reset the bindings??? just get the screwdriver and if your binding release to early, adjust them That's it!!
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone. So it's that simple, take a screwdriver and adjust to the setting that best fits me, there's nothing I'm missing, no secret methods to setting the DIN that I am not aware of?
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbakersnow View Post
Thanks everyone. So it's that simple, take a screwdriver and adjust to the setting that best fits me, there's nothing I'm missing, no secret methods to setting the DIN that I am not aware of?
Make sure you turn the proper screw. One in the back is din and the other is sole length. If you change the sole length instead of the din, you just @#$%ed up and should take them back to the shop and have them redo the whole thing.
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by learn2turn View Post
Make sure you turn the proper screw. One in the back is din and the other is sole length. If you change the sole length instead of the din, you just @#$%ed up and should take them back to the shop and have them redo the whole thing.
Depends on the binding. Many or most "consumer" bindings these days use a tab to set forward pressure, instead of a screw. Regardless, adjusting forward pressure isn't rocket science, and I like to recheck it after adjusting DIN to be safe.

MBS, what kind of bindings are you working with? I have posted links to electronic copies of recent vintage manuals for all brands other than Marker (I couldn't find those) in a post on this forum.
post #16 of 18
Sounds like you are aggressive and experienced.

You can do it yourself not prob. Tip - get a LARGE Phillips screw driver specifically for binding adj and leave in you tuning kit.

I am going to say 8. I HATE popping out but I ski on Eastern hardpack a lot. (think chatterchatterchatterchatter).

I am about 170# and I usually keep things at @ 9 for mostly league racing and high speed carving. Maybe crank 'em up a bit if conditions are bulletproof.

If you are often skiing in mashed potatoes or conditions that want to tweak your tips in directions not intended for the human knee to accomodate, dial 'em down a smidge.

Unless you know the guy at the ski shop or he knows you, never never never just step into freshly serviced skis and go. DINS are generally dialed way down for liability reasons at the shop. Who can blame them?
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Racer256 View Post
DINS are generally dialed way down for liability reasons at the shop. Who can blame them?
I've always thought that pre-releasing at seriously inopportune moments is more dangerous than not releasing when it's iffy whether or not you need to come out. It's a fine balance. There could be litigation from that side of the spectrum as well...
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
For the record, and I should have known this, boot is 315 mm.
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