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Steepest widest? - Page 3

post #61 of 76

was just reacting to Sibhusky's inquiry, and typed before I saw what Richie posted mid-thread. glad you're on top of superfluous posts, however, thanks so much for the insight.

 

also, widest includes slopes so wide that you can't ski the whole thing anyhow (without traversing as has been noted), so where's the correlation to the arc a skier  makes??? 

 

The poster of The Turn Felt Around the World, with Nobis carving his big (50+mph) powder turn in Alaska, shows an arc that is 100 yards wide at the max. His skill is in holding a long arc close to the fall line.

Where, duh, would your skill be, exactly??

 

Back on track, Richie, I just organized my info, and will conclude that in California, Mammoth would be the biggest: Cornice area.

 

And I'm guessing if RR just asked for steep runs, he'd hear about a plethora of 12' wide chutes that he has no interest in skiing, so biggest widest is the search.

Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

Yeah, Richie is looking for a wide slope so he can farm fall-line powder turns. Haha. Dude likes to carve big arcs. The wider the slope, the bigger the arc, duh.



 


Edited by davluri - 5/16/2009 at 03:38 am GMT
post #62 of 76

The beauty of big and wide is you can make big wide turns if you want and, you can come back agaian and again with the possabilty of more fresh tracks.  We all have to agree, that is a good thing.

 

Go straight, SG, or short radius, who cares.  I'll leave some for you if you'll leave some for me.

post #63 of 76

The obvious answer is flying a heli in AK. From what you can see in the movies, there are limitless 50+ degree 3000+ vert walls that you can go as fast as you can handle, do as big turns as you want down.

post #64 of 76
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gramboh View Post

The obvious answer is flying a heli in AK. From what you can see in the movies, there are limitless 50+ degree 3000+ vert walls that you can go as fast as you can handle, do as big turns as you want down.


Thats probably my ultimate ski destination.....one day...one day.  Till then lift serviced areas will have to do.
 

post #65 of 76

Outer Limits is a joke compared to everytning in the west.

 

Theres even steeper stuff in the east!

post #66 of 76

You don't need a parachute.

THere's one steep turn on the headwall, and then its not that bad although i have seen people fall on an icyday and slide to the lift line.

post #67 of 76

I hate to bust your guy's bubbles, but you are ALL dead wrong. The Steepest inbound run in North America is Corbetts Coluair( Jackson Hole). Its certainly not the widest, (only 50 ft at the top) but it is without a doubt-the steepest.

 

Nothing in the east even comes close, in fact-on the other side is Rendevous bowl which is steeper and wider than anything in the east as well.

 

Pretty much anything on rendeavous mountain at Jackson Hole is crazy steep.

 

We were there in January.....its friggin nuts

post #68 of 76

Well, this is true, but he said "inbounds"

 

Heliskiing in AK is not inbounds.......sorry

post #69 of 76

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhino 300 View Post

I hate to bust your guy's bubbles, but you are ALL dead wrong. The Steepest inbound run in North America is Corbetts Coluair( Jackson Hole). Its certainly not the widest, (only 50 ft at the top) but it is without a doubt-the steepest.

 

Nothing in the east even comes close, in fact-on the other side is Rendevous bowl which is steeper and wider than anything in the east as well.

 

Pretty much anything on rendeavous mountain at Jackson Hole is crazy steep.

 

We were there in January.....its friggin nuts



That made me laugh and reminded me of this.wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_steepest_ski_slope

 


"Now, if you were to ask a skier who doesn't really research the subject of skiing, than they would easily say Corbet's Couloir as it is very famous."

 

"Now, what about the famous expert galore Jackson Hole? Well, did you know that there are very few spots that go over 42 degrees and in bounds? Barely anything hits 50 degrees!"

 

 

 

post #70 of 76

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhino 300 View Post

I hate to bust your guy's bubbles, but you are ALL dead wrong. The Steepest inbound run in North America is Corbetts Coluair( Jackson Hole). Its certainly not the widest, (only 50 ft at the top) but it is without a doubt-the steepest.

 

Nothing in the east even comes close, in fact-on the other side is Rendevous bowl which is steeper and wider than anything in the east as well.

 

Pretty much anything on rendeavous mountain at Jackson Hole is crazy steep.

 

We were there in January.....its friggin nuts

Without a doubt. After all, you've been there.

post #71 of 76

Yeppers, a perfect playgorund of a mountain but inbounds not really that steep (lots of drops, lots of steep entrances to things, but other than that not steep).  The steepest parts inbounds are ironically both easily seen and not nearly as well-known.  Outside the resort there are lots of very steep options though. 

 

Honestly that may be instructive that steep by itself is overrated and maybe even a dead-end thing.

post #72 of 76
Where are all these slope angle estimates coming from? Is anyone using a clinometer? If this is not the case, perhaps we could all get one before next season and then this thread would be more meaningful.

To get a clinometer go to the local hardware store and buy something cheap that measures slope angle (small and with a bubble). Or get the slope meter out of your avy kit and use that (life link slope meter). To get the measurement, place your pole on the snow parallel to the overall average slope angle visible. Place the clinometer on the pole and read angle. Short sections don't count. Be honest here.

I doubt seriously there are many slopes at NA areas that are steeper than 40 for very long. Corbett's 50 after landing, 40 average, but not for much vertical. Big Couloir at Big Sky, 50's for a short section, mostly 40's and high 30's. That was before it was a run, and I had to jump off cornice to enter. Remember slope angle can be influenced by snow fall and wind load so these numbers were only accurate for that day.

I measured the Baldy Chutes at Alta years ago, and it ranged from mid 30's to high 30's. When the slope approaches 60-degrees or more you can put your arm just about straight out and touch the uphill side of the slope. This is a good indicator of steepness. I have also learned that in the backcountry on big exposed slopes it starts to look steep at about 29-degrees. Especially, when there is a cliff or rocks at the slope bottom.

For our purposes here, can we agree that slope angle must be consistent for at least 400 vertical and get back on this thread next winter to submit our findings? It could look like this: Angle/average width/vertical feet/run name/area = 35/180/510/Face of Warm Springs/Sun Valley. All measurements must be inside the ropes. Doing this will give us all a good estimate of reality and usable information.

To determine vertical use your altimeter watch.

I doubt there is much out there inside the ropes above 40 for any distance. A number of chutes have short sections above 40, but nothing sustainable for 400 vertical. CTKook pretty much nailed it in post above.
post #73 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by shipps View Post


For our purposes here, can we agree that slope angle must be consistent for at least 400 vertical

Well I guess that means Chicopee won't be included.

You can also use a protractor a string a washer and a bit of tape, or if you're really cheap, just photcopy the protractor.
post #74 of 76
They all seem so much steeper when you close your eyes.  This is all okee dokee but what happened to the widest part? 

Alright all you back country types, at what point is something too steep to hold snow on a sustained slope?  

Rocks, exposure, trees, chutes et al will all make a difference.  But I'm thinking somewhere around 50 degrees on a sustained open slope is about the limit for something safely skiable.  There will be more severe pitches and head walls , but what about something that goes for a ways?  Any thoughts?   
post #75 of 76
It isn't the steepest or the widest, but for sustained steep fall line skiing that is wide enough to make long arcs, it is hard to beat the chutes at Castle.
post #76 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

They all seem so much steeper when you close your eyes.  This is all okee dokee but what happened to the widest part? 

Alright all you back country types, at what point is something too steep to hold snow on a sustained slope?  

Rocks, exposure, trees, chutes et al will all make a difference.  But I'm thinking somewhere around 50 degrees on a sustained open slope is about the limit for something safely skiable.  There will be more severe pitches and head walls , but what about something that goes for a ways?  Any thoughts?   
Snow sticks up to about a 75-degree pitch with the right conditions. Up to 60-degree is very skiable, but you will want to use self-arrest grips on your poles. Nothing over 30-degrees in the backcountry is completely safe to ski due to avalanche. Although taking all the right precautions up the odds of a successful descent. There is a recorded descent of 70-degrees. It appeared in one of the ski mags about a year or two ago. It was a ski descent basically without turns in the crux of the headwall. Perhaps it was Backcountry Mag. I will look through my collection and let you know if I find it.

To increase the validity of this thread let's set a minimum width for discussion. How about 100 feet? 200 feet? ....? Too anal?
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