or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Ski RX8's, need skis for bumps - recommendations?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Ski RX8's, need skis for bumps - recommendations?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I need to get better in the bumps in my quest to take the LII Part 1 exam.

I ski 165 and 175 RX8's in everything. Love them.

What would be a good ski for me to use for the bumps? Most of the year in the East. This ski could possibly also be my teaching ski if your recommendation could serve both purposes.

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

Steve
post #2 of 23
Dynastar Contact 11 in a 172cm, Dynastar 8000 or Rossignol B2, IMHO.

These could fill a dual role.

Michael
post #3 of 23
Sweet Daddy
Public Enemy

Something about 80 in the waist, not a system ski w/ a sidecut of 20 +/-. Ski it head height.
post #4 of 23
I have several friends skiing RX8s in the bumps, both zipperline and round turns. They're not competitive type bumpers, just guys who like the challenge. I'd think that if you can perform all other LII skiing requirements with your RX8s, that would be the ski to get better in the bumps on.
post #5 of 23
You should get a 170cm RX8.
post #6 of 23
If the bumps are very tight, steep, tall, ugly and icy, probably the 165s would be best.
post #7 of 23
I took my Part I with Fischer AMC 76's, and did pretty well. Those skis are a lot easier to take across a wide range of activities. They also are easier to do a Wedge Christie on, because they are less likely to carve the whole turn. The bumps on the Part I are really easy bumps, and you are unlikely to be taken into anything serious. The RX 8's or AMC's would have been fine in the bumps I skied. Focus on the key movements, and making the adjustments to the same movements to generate the various turns required in your demos.
post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
I need to get better in the bumps in my quest to take the LII Part 1 exam.

I ski 165 and 175 RX8's in everything. Love them.

What would be a good ski for me to use for the bumps? Most of the year in the East. This ski could possibly also be my teaching ski if your recommendation could serve both purposes.

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

Steve
Um... RX8's. :

What is wrong with either pair of RX8's in the bumps? They aren't really stiff, and while turny, they aren't as aggressive as a race ski... You can only use one ski for the exam anyway, so if I were you I'd focus on learning to ski bumps on your RX8's and less on what is between you and the snow because come exam time - your skiing is what is going to matter - not what is on your feet. I'd say you have a more than managable ski in bumps (either length that you choose). I don't mean to offend but, if you can't ski the RX8 in bumps to the level that you will need to for a level 2 skiing exam, the skis are most likely not your problem. New equipement isn't always the answer.

As a sidenote... If I were going to go test for shiny new pin I would probably just go on my 165 SLRs.

Later

GREG
post #9 of 23
Obviously, not an instructor so can't give advice about using same ski for practice and test. But as another kind of teacher, my .02: Tool to perfect skills may be different from a tool to teach or to get tested. All about skill set transfer.

I'd say an old Rossi B1 if you just wanted to practice, then take new skill set to your RX8's and get used to how they react to new input. (Which to my only advanced senses are a bit stiff in the tail to rock bumps.) Or, Contact 11 if you also wanted these also for teaching and rec skiing (very different animal than RX8, have owned both, Contact far better in bumps, in crud, and at speed, not as good at pure carving or slow motion.)
post #10 of 23
Thread Starter 
OK everyone thanks! Great advice and thoughts - I do agree with those of you that say I should be able to ski bumps on the RX8's (and I can, sometimes, if they're soft, if it it's not too steep - but that's me, not the skis!)

I think I'll just need to wait and demo, the Christie abilities of the skis do seem important too.

Lots of days on the hill, lots. Lots of training, coaching. Oh and a good pair of skis too, I guess that matters as well - but it does come down to my skills.
post #11 of 23
I have to agree with Heluva.
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

- I do agree with those of you that say I should be able to ski bumps on the RX8's (and I can, sometimes, if they're soft, if it it's not too steep - but that's me, not the skis!)
Can you say what it is that you don't like about the ski. Do you find the ski grips too much - that you can't release the edge to smear the turn? Or is the ski too stiff.

I have been surprised to find wider skis performing well in the bumps. Also, less side cut is better, I think (?), so the ski doesn't hook up in the turn so much.
post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 
Paul, we need to keep in mind my limited skills in the bumps before we blame the skis. They are however fairly stiff skis, and they most assuredly like to carve. So my thought is that a ski with more flex would be easier to ski in the bumps.

A few months of working on my bump skiing and I'll report back about how the RX8's do. I have big plans for my bump skiing.
post #14 of 23
When is the test? Maybe a bunch of us could get together at Okemo and clinic a bit. Okemo has great development bumps.

As I recall, most of the mountains that you ski don't really have much in the way of bumps. It might also help to get away from the structured approach to learning and just mimic the style you like. Somtimes you need a change or a different approach to make a break through.

Something along those lines
post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 
I'll look for a test in March. Berkshire East has some nice bumps in a good year, otherwise I'll have to go elsewhere. I do spend 2 weeks in Vail every year, so I'll get lots of bumps in late February. I also plan on taking a PSIA bump clinic, maybe in January.

Wachusett has this field of man made icy bumps that I've always hated, but my thought is I'll have to ski them a lot so I don't hate them, and I'm sure they'll be good for me.

Only two kinds of conditions; conditions that are good and conditions that are good for you!

I'd love to come up to Okemo and clinic with you sometime - thanks!
post #16 of 23
Thread Starter 
All this talk about skis for the bumps, and skiing the bumps.

What it comes down to to me is that if you can ski bumps, you can ski. The active absorption, flexing and extending to "erase" the bumps - is such a quantum leap in technical ability, that I need to get there while I still have the physical ability. I know that it will carry over to the crud, powder, and everything else that I love to do.
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
Wachusett has this field of man made icy bumps that I've always hated, but my thought is I'll have to ski them a lot so I don't hate them, and I'm sure they'll be good for me.
Jiminy Peak has those icy bumps - good place to get hurt
post #18 of 23
SMJ,

I went with the AMC 73 as my bump ski this year.

I haven't tried them, hope they work well.
post #19 of 23
Sounds like you know that good bump skiing cannot be bought. New skis have made powder skiing and carving much easier, but bump skiing isn't as much about the skis. I love my carvers in the bumps, powder skiers swear "fatties fit fine". Very few of us have bump specific skis in our quivers. "Run what you brung" seems to be the prevailing attitude. Try fatter skis, softer, straighter if you get a chance, a different ski MIGHT make bumps easier, but you CAN become a very good bump skier without buying more skis.

Be careful about practicing in bumps that are too big, icy, sharp. You could develop bad habits if the terrain is too tough to allow you to develop good habits. When the bumps are difficult, work on speed control and making careful, deliberate movements, when they are easier work on rhythm and flow.

At places like Ski Liberty, and I assume Berkshire East, bumps are the only challenge outside of the park and pipe. Why we aren't considering bump skis as our primary ski probably has a lot to do with marketing but also something to do with the fact that skills matter more than skis in the moguls.
post #20 of 23
Funny thing is that the RX8 is a pretty good bump ski as carving skis go. Why do you have two of them? A super forgiving ski will help you ski more bumps with poorly but it won't make you a better bump skier.
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Sounds like you know that good bump skiing cannot be bought. New skis have made powder skiing and carving much easier, but bump skiing isn't as much about the skis. I love my carvers in the bumps, powder skiers swear "fatties fit fine". Very few of us have bump specific skis in our quivers. "Run what you brung" seems to be the prevailing attitude. Try fatter skis, softer, straighter if you get a chance, a different ski MIGHT make bumps easier, but you CAN become a very good bump skier without buying more skis.

Be careful about practicing in bumps that are too big, icy, sharp. You could develop bad habits if the terrain is too tough to allow you to develop good habits. When the bumps are difficult, work on speed control and making careful, deliberate movements, when they are easier work on rhythm and flow.

At places like Ski Liberty, and I assume Berkshire East, bumps are the only challenge outside of the park and pipe. Why we aren't considering bump skis as our primary ski probably has a lot to do with marketing but also something to do with the fact that skills matter more than skis in the moguls.
^^^What he said^^^

I find that skiing bumps allot on a ski I am familiar with is the best medicine.
Also pick a line on a bump run and ski that same line over and over again, the familiarity with the line will help build confidence thoughout the day and then you can take the new bump confidence into any mogul terrain.

Also physical conditioning has a much greater effect on mogul skiing than equipment.
My .02
post #22 of 23
Thread Starter 
I agree Telerod.

tromano, I find the 165 and 175's to be a good 2 ski quiver, the 165's are great when I feel like making lots of short carvy turns, the 175's are better on a big mountain, or when I feel like longer turn cruising. They both do what the other one does fine, but there is a real difference.

i love the 175's actually. Most likely the 170's would be a great all around compromise, but I'm not buying 3 pairs!
post #23 of 23
Just remember that bumps is only one part of your level 2 exam, so don't get too worked up about it. Also, something I was told when I first started instructing "always take your exams n winter snow". Don't wait too long, there's a reason why teams tryouts are in the late spring. As for skis, I have lots of different skis that I like in bumps. Some of them I like in different kinds of bumps. For example, I used to have a pair of P60SCs that were really fun on frozen bumps in mid-January, but not fun at all on rotten sun softened rained on bumps in April. I think a really narrow waisted ski witha lot of sidecut can get pretty tough in conditions like that. Now I don't know much about the Fischer line, but if you want to keep it in the family, maybe one of those AMC skis would be good. Something with a radius around 14 so you can look good for the rest of the exam.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Ski RX8's, need skis for bumps - recommendations?