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Bring your own slalom brushes?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I dont get nearly enough time racing and or training as I would like, since I really cant afford to hire a coach and to ski every weekend, I was thinking of maybe buying my own brushes and setting up a mini course on any given mountain (low traffic area of course). The brushes would be the kind you can ski over without damaging your bases or disturbing your balance.

Do you think that there would be a problem with this?
post #2 of 12
Yes.
post #3 of 12
This has to be coordinated with hill management and ski patrol. There are some safety and hillspace/utilization issues. A better option might be to see if you can train with a local juniors program via a punch pass or in exchange for some physical labor.

This comes from a guy with his own sets of brushes, stubbies, and full-sized gates. I've been there.
post #4 of 12

$$$

As the president of a local ski club, have you priced slalom brushes or stubbies + you will need a high end cordless drill and drill bits to install your stubbies.

You can pay for a season or two of regualr caoching for what it will cost you for gear.

If you opt for buying your own equipment, good luck getting hill space as a solo adult wanting to train. Set your brushes up without permission and kiss your pass goodbye.

My 2 cents
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski-Dad View Post
As the president of a local ski club, have you priced slalom brushes or stubbies + you will need a high end cordless drill and drill bits to install your stubbies.

You can pay for a season or two of regualr caoching for what it will cost you for gear.

If you opt for buying your own equipment, good luck getting hill space as a solo adult wanting to train. Set your brushes up without permission and kiss your pass goodbye.

My 2 cents
Yeah I have been checking the prices.....ouch!
post #6 of 12
I can remember skiing around some old mittens that someone accidentally dropped on the hill.
Mind you this hill was only good for four turns.
post #7 of 12
While I feel for the trees involved, it's not uncommon to make your own "pine bough slalom." Little chunks of evergreen branches spread out on the snow make a great training device. They're a lot cheaper than brushes, don't require a drill, and you don't have to pull them when you're done. Even race teams do it sometimes.

You can also try one of my favorite impromptu drills: the "lift shadow slalom." On a sunny day, on a run beneath a chairlift, turn around the shadows of the chairs. You can use the upgoing shadows for tighter turns, or the downgoing shadows for longer turns, or turn around both of them as you desire. Skiing around both is especially great for developing instinctive tactics in changing conditions and rhythm changes, looking ahead, and improvising. One WORD OF WARNING, though: Beware that, as the sun moves across the sky, your line will change, sometimes bringing obstacles into the course that weren't there on your last run--like lift towers. Pay attention!

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes/Colorado View Post

You can also try one of my favorite impromptu drills: the "lift shadow slalom."
Great suggestion, Bob.

I've never heard that one before. I can't wait to give it a try.

Thanks.
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Good tips Bob, thanks!
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
Yeah I have been checking the prices.....ouch!
I don't want to even think about all of the money I have in my shed tied up in SPM 27mm gates, stubbies, brushes, bamboo, gate bags, drills, bits, wrenches, GS panels, bibs... not to mention the Alge timing system (wireless, of course). If the Alge system were to ever fail, I have TAG Heuer and Reliable Racing systems sitting there on the shelf. It's a slippery slope once you get started. My advice- don't start.

Join a Masters, Beer, or NASTAR league that provides training. Make nice with the local Junior or collegiate team. Hire a private coach if all else fails. Most importantly, put in a lot of miles.
post #11 of 12
If you get a shitload of snow where you live, and you have a decent sized back yard with a hill, just make your own trail with gates. My friend and I cut down some trees this summer for a FS course that was originally supposed to be a race course, but lack of snow here would have made it impossible. I suggest the backyard trail if you have that option.
post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
Backyard trail...I wish! Long Island NY is so flat they have to build a 500ft indoor ski resort.
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