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Bake/mold my boots?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Hi Everyone,

I just joined Epicski today. This is my very first posting. My question is: I just purchased brand-new ski boots. Should I bake/mold my boots BEFORE I ski them? Or, should I bake/mold them AFTER I ski a few times? There are so many conflicting opinions out there. I am very confused. Thank you very much in advance.

Colotele
post #2 of 13
If you are sure they are the right size, bake 'em. Check shell size, wear 'em around the house. When you are sure you don't want to return them, customize the liners. I can't think of any good reason to ski in unbaked custom liners. Welcome to Epicski! There is a good tutorial on baking liners over at Telemarktips.com.
post #3 of 13
No ski them first, they may not need anything. This is what two boot fitters have told me (but that does not make them right). That being said my liners are not baked and they fit. The liner will slowly conform to your foot shape, not always do they need to be baked, baking speeds this up and can save you days of breaking in and painful skiing, but again only if it is needed.
post #4 of 13
Why would you spend 2-3 days using skiing to bash your liners into the shape of your foot (and fill out any dead spots in your shells) when you can achieve the same in 10-20 minutes by heat forming them?

Get them heat formed before you ski and make any small adjustments that need making after 2-3 days of skiing (unless there is a glaringly obvious pinch point - but anything glaringly obvious should be detectable after wearing them in teh shop for 40-60 minutes).

Time spent in proper preparation is rarely wasted.
post #5 of 13
Shell fit is everything. Hopefully that is where you started. I'm not sure if you plan to DIY but there are some tricks to heat forming, including getting the temperature right, using a toe cup to create some space, stepping into the mushy liners without deforming them and standing still with the toe raised on a board or something. Anyway, IMO it's worth having a shop do the heating and help with the fit. Cost is pretty minimal, especially before the new season sales get rolling in October and November.

and welcome to the asylum. We're still a few weeks away from starting our treatment.
post #6 of 13
Before you mold or not mold you must check shell fit and have any tight areas fixed. Liners typically do not fix pain caused by shells. After that do what you like you may find that the liners won't need anyting, but of course molding them will speed up the final comfort process. But shell shape is 95%.
post #7 of 13
Ski them first. The only liners I've ever baked were my Scarpa Denali's, and they kinda need to be baked just to feel normal. Like a Deadhead.
post #8 of 13
So Jer generally skis in custom liners that have not been customized? What is the advantage to that?
post #9 of 13
No big deal. Just do it and don't worry about it. I recommend 220F degrees for 10 minutes. If you can use a convection over, that's better -- it distributes the heat more evenly.
post #10 of 13
like Cirquerider says, get a shop to fit them for you - the cost is much more if you stuff them up and have to buy new ones @ $170. Why trouble yourself?...A guy, who works for a ski shop and has a "lab" at home, did them(Scarpa t1's) for me and used several tricks - extra socks, toe cap, flexing on a board, etc to get a perfect fit.
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
So Jer generally skis in custom liners that have not been customized? What is the advantage to that?
My alpine boots are Tecnica Diablo Mags - I believe these can be cooked, but they fit great the way they are. Why mess with a good thing? Cooking liners (and potentially messing them up) that already fit great is like keeping the edges on powder skis razor sharp. Luckily, I have really normal feet, 'cause I really don't put much effort into my gear. Which is weird, 'cause I used to be a boot fitter/ski tech.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post
Cooking liners (and potentially messing them up) that already fit great is like keeping the edges on powder skis razor sharp.
That makes sense to me. If they work, they work. No big deal, really.
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
If you are sure they are the right size, bake 'em. Check shell size, wear 'em around the house. When you are sure you don't want to return them, customize the liners. I can't think of any good reason to ski in unbaked custom liners. Welcome to Epicski! There is a good tutorial on baking liners over at Telemarktips.com.
Now that you have "asked the boot pros" and got the same answer, return the boots. Most on-line boot sellers are very good about returns.
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