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What's The Hairiest, Scariest, Freakiest Mountain Road? - Page 4

post #91 of 108
Yep that be L'Alpe d'Huez, also a ski resort.
post #92 of 108
Quote:
So I’ll probably not go back to Corona. Special place for Granddad and I and I’ll remember it as it was.
Some memories aren't to be messed with. Remember it as it was. There were some RR ties around but really rotted. It was a really cool road. I couldn't get up to where the wye / Corona townsite was - my father couldn't handle the heights. It was beautiful up there. Great views of Winter Park. A mountain lion ran in front of the pickup at the bottom.
post #93 of 108
Well, I just went up the road to Big Mountain to go to the locals' only sale. It can be removed from the scary roads list. They've added guard rails and taken out some switchbacks. The result is a more sustained pitch. The road is definitely wider as well. As long as they keep it sanded so that skidding vehicles don't pick up more speed before leaving the road (less turns to interrupt the slide) it should be rather mundane.
post #94 of 108

Gov't. Camp to Timberline Lodge

I was 16, a busboy at Timberline Lodge, Mt. Hood, and had borrowed my friends 1959 Plymouth, long on power, short on tires and shocks. I'm driving a girl who waitressed with me down the mountain to look for a parking place and as I come to a long rt. hairpin, I punch it. That car leans way over and the tail slides for the guardrail across the uphill lane. Can't have that. countersteer bigtime and the tail comes swinging back, fishtailing and squealing way back and all the way around. I''m now pointed straight at the guard rail, foot still on the gas. Smack, nailed it, and tore it in half, both ragged lengths hanging over the precipice (400 ft.? anyone?) and the Plymouth with one wheel suspended in mid air. We're alright, we're not so cool at the moment, and my bud is not going to like the front right fender the way it looks now. Click the Power-glide into reverse and pray. Easy.....Whew!

But when my tables at Timberline would say: "My God did you see that! Who drove off the cliff? They must have been killed for sure." I couldn't shut up. I had to say: "'twas I, my friend, and lived to tell the tale" or something along those 16 yr old ski racer lines. Well my dumb-a-- bragging got me a humongous bill from the state of Oregon and an invitation never to drive within her borders again. I hope they have forgiven or at least forgotten, as I never did get the dough for 80 feet of guardrail, and I have become a conservative driver, if not a more modest person.

No pics. apologies. have been back though, on a bicycle mostly.

A road dangerous without teen drivers to challenge its 30 or so hairpins is Stelvio Pass, a road I drove in a VW camper piloted by a ski patrol friend in 1963 to ski the glacier in the summer. All national team skiers. Awesome moguls, all in the fall line. no one ever traversed one bump.
post #95 of 108
I've been on "Going to the Sun Road" in Glacier during the summer and it is a switchback road. Followed a recreational vehicle at a crawl so it wasn't intimidating. I don't know what ski area it goes to unless you are headed towards Big Sk
y.
On the same trip I went out of the northwest gate of Yellowstone and went through Bear Tooth Pass. "Beartooth Highway is the section of U.S. Highway 212 between Red Lodge, Montana and Cooke City, Montana. It traces a series of steep zigzags and switchbacks, along the Montana-Wyoming border to the 10,974 foot (3,345 m.) high Beartooth Pass." Taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beartooth_Highway.

That was an incredible drive but again I don't know what ski area it goes to, maybe Jackson Hole?

Last year at Tahoe I drove up Donner Pass (It’s just called Donner Pass Road) to go to Sugar Bowl. It started snowing skiing there and I took another way out. I did not want to drive down that road during a snowstorm.

I have skied Hunter many times and the road ( Rt. 23A) gets scary when crossing Katterskill Creek) but I never had a problem on it even when snow covered (had the luxury of 4WD).

102
post #96 of 108
Hi,

I've been on "Going to the Sun Road" in Glacier during the summer and it is a switchback road. Followed a recreational vehicle at a crawl so it wasn't intimidating. I don't know what ski area it goes to unless you are headed towards Big Sky.

On the same trip I went out of the northwest gate of Yellowstone and went through Bear Tooth Pass. "Beartooth Highway is the section of U.S. Highway 212 between Red Lodge, Montana and Cooke City, Montana. It traces a series of steep zigzags and switchbacks, along the Montana-Wyoming border to the 10,974 foot (3,345 m.) high Beartooth Pass." Taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beartooth_Highway.

That was an incredible drive but again I don't know what ski area it goes to, maybe Jackson Hole?

Last year at Tahoe I drove up Donner Pass (It’s just called Donner Pass Road) to go to Sugar Bowl. It started snowing skiing there and I took another way out. I did not want to drive down that road during a snowstorm.

I have skied Hunter many times and the road ( Rt. 23A) gets scary when crossing Katterskill Creek) but I never had a problem on it even when snow covered (had the luxury of 4WD).

102
post #97 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by oneotwoandcounting View Post
Hi,

I've been on "Going to the Sun Road" in Glacier during the summer and it is a switchback road. Followed a recreational vehicle at a crawl so it wasn't intimidating. I don't know what ski area it goes to unless you are headed towards Big Sky.
Going to the Sun just cuts across Glacier and is probably six hours away from Big Sky, so I'd never consider it as going to Big Sky. I guess if you live in Browning....wait, in winter it's closed so you're not headed westward to Big Mountain either. The Sun road is not a winter road, so forget it for a ski area road. It is a twisty high road with lots of construction that requires you to watch your driving and stop telling the kids to behave.
post #98 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by oneotwoandcounting View Post
Hi,

I've been on "Going to the Sun Road" in Glacier during the summer and it is a switchback road. Followed a recreational vehicle at a crawl so it wasn't intimidating.
Did you take a dip in the lake? That's cold water!
I went through in the summer time too, but there wasn't much traffic, so I could enjoy some of the corners. Just try to imagine pulling camper around those corners on ice.
post #99 of 108
No I didn't take a, "dip in the lake" (I wish I had).I jumped in Lake Champlain after a long bike ride in late spring and it was freezing. I live in the Adirondack Mountains of NY and some of the lakes (the ones at higher elevations)here stay pretty cool in the summer.

I was fly-fishing in Wyoming a few years ago and in August a stream I was in (The Crystal Stream - outside of Jackson - by about 40 miles) was only 47 degrees F. I didn't have waders and my legs turned blue. The same was true for the Cimarron River in Northern New Mexico. Those high elevation lakes and streams are cold no matter when.

102
post #100 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieP View Post
Sept 19, 2007

Don't know where this is, but it reminds me of the Canadian Interstate going from Vancouver to Big White.

Cheers,

CP
Its the road upto Lech in Austria
post #101 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by oneotwoandcounting View Post
Hi,


On the same trip I went out of the northwest gate of Yellowstone and went through Bear Tooth Pass. "Beartooth Highway is the section of U.S. Highway 212 between Red Lodge, Montana and Cooke City, Montana. It traces a series of steep zigzags and switchbacks, along the Montana-Wyoming border to the 10,974 foot (3,345 m.) high Beartooth Pass." Taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beartooth_Highway.

That was an incredible drive but again I don't know what ski area it goes to, maybe Jackson Hole?
Until the road got washed out, there was summer skiing on the beartooth. Curses.

I found the road to the Hellroaring plateau (north of the pass) much worse in snow.
post #102 of 108

Treble Cone - second, third, and final vote!

Of course I made the mistake of driving up to TC on a warm slushy day when the ice and mude were melting with my wife, her best friend, and 3 month old baby in the car. Talk about self-preservation instincts! It was indeed a white knuckle ride but I quite enjoyed the adrenaline surge. Whereas they were just freaking out the whole time, my wife couldn't open her eyes for a good 20 minutes.

It's nothing to the Kiwis that do it every day, but I'm used to Steamboat.

Mt. Hutt in a fog bank was also pretty hairy as there are some nice dropoffs near the top of the mountain and CRAZY MAD drivers passing on curves with windows down blasting maori dub music ...

TC also has the strange feeling that you're always falling into the valley off the mountain ...

Great terrain though, highly recommend a trip to NZ (check the trip forum for an amazing NZ travelogue).
post #103 of 108
I was looking for a photo of the Furka Pass in Switzerland and found this website: (warning : may waste your next 30 minutes in drop jaw amazment)

http://www.linkinn.com/_Earth_s_Most_Dangerous_Roads

This is not the Furka, but a good road eh?

post #104 of 108
Yep, just killed a good twenty minutes. Thanks for the link...breathtaking stuff.
post #105 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
Furka Pass in Switzerland
Yep Furka in dense fog and whiteout - fond memories with the Mrs.
post #106 of 108
Thats quite the road.

To rep New England, the drive at night through Crawford Notch, NH (albeit not dangerous) is creepy if you know the story behind the Willey family and their infamous mudslide death. People always have ghost stories up there about their spirits still lingering around the river banks below the site.
post #107 of 108
People have caught almost everything that springs to mind.

I thought Ohau had the least improved road in New Zealand and I hadn't seen that one mentioned. Much narrower than Treble Cone or Mt Hutt.

The Valle Nevado road up from Santiago was very hairy before they improved it a few years ago.
post #108 of 108
I was driving a pretty sweet road here the other day for giggles, prominently marked "ROAD CLOSED. UNIMPROVED. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK." which of course meant I thought it was perfectly appropriate for me to drive it at night, alone, in the snow, in a RWD van. No cellphone service up there. Couldn't see much, but I bet the view is pretty sweet during the day.

The creepiest part was coming across an FBI poster for this woman who had been killed and left right there, where I was standing alone, about the same time of year 8 years ago. Hrmm.
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